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Is the managed bean singleton?

Ivan Lou
Greenhorn

Joined: Oct 08, 2008
Posts: 2
I'm beginner of learning jsf. I want to know whether the managed bean is singleton
Tim Holloway
Saloon Keeper

Joined: Jun 25, 2001
Posts: 17149
    
  27

Yes and no. It depends on how "single" you want it.

An application-scope managed bean is truly single. Only one of them per copy of the deployed webapp per server VM.

A session-scope managed bean is singleton on a per-user basis, but with multiple users, each user gets a unique and separate bean instance.

A request-scope bean is singleton on a per-request basis, but there can be lots of requests.

The "single"-ness of managed beans is determined by the fact that each bean ID in faces-config must be unique, so only one bean with that ID may exist in the context of its defined scope.

Only application scope is really singleton, the rest, like I said are unique, but only withing their contexts.


An IDE is no substitute for an Intelligent Developer.
Ivan Lou
Greenhorn

Joined: Oct 08, 2008
Posts: 2
Tim Holloway wrote:Yes and no. It depends on how "single" you want it.

An application-scope managed bean is truly single. Only one of them per copy of the deployed webapp per server VM.

A session-scope managed bean is singleton on a per-user basis, but with multiple users, each user gets a unique and separate bean instance.

A request-scope bean is singleton on a per-request basis, but there can be lots of requests.

The "single"-ness of managed beans is determined by the fact that each bean ID in faces-config must be unique, so only one bean with that ID may exist in the context of its defined scope.

Only application scope is really singleton, the rest, like I said are unique, but only withing their contexts.


Thank you, Tim Holloway.
 
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