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success getting ruby accepted at work?

 
Jason Mayer
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I work for a large corporation. I was hired as a java dev based on my ruby experience. I've tried to get management and upper management to take another look at ruby for general scripting work, reporting things, etc, but they always say no, use perl or groovy (the two accepted languages). Has anyone had any success at all in getting Ruby adopted at a large corporation?
 
Bear Bibeault
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If the current tools are working, then there's no need to rock the boat. If the current tools have deficiencies that could be remedied by using Ruby, then that's your value proposition. Otherwise, it's just a waste of time trying to make a change for change's sake.
 
Matt Williams
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I've been using JRuby; it seems to be a good compromise. That said, one of the ways of getting something in can be via creating a proof of concept and/or demo and showing how quickly you can get something working.

Even so, they're the ones who in the long run have to live with supporting the apps -- if you leave or otherwise are not available they have to find someone who will support it and if they've settled on a particular set of languages that they support, the easier it is to find inhouse resources.
 
Pradeep bhatt
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Originally posted by Matt Williams:
I've been using JRuby; it seems to be a good compromise. That said, one of the ways of getting something in can be via creating a proof of concept and/or demo and showing how quickly you can get something working.

Even so, they're the ones who in the long run have to live with supporting the apps -- if you leave or otherwise are not available they have to find someone who will support it and if they've settled on a particular set of languages that they support, the easier it is to find inhouse resources.


A very good point. The best thing to do would be to take an existsing application and develop ROR version. You can show them it can be done quickly.
 
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