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Happy Indepandance Day(15-August)

Vikram Kohli
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Joined: Nov 27, 2005
Posts: 174
Hi All
Happy Independance day to all.


But let me ask all ranchers from India,a couple of Question :-
1) What is the significance of the 15-Auagust to you?
2) How are you contributing to your country?
3) Does our country on right track of Development?


Vikram PracLabs
Chetan Parekh
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 16, 2004
Posts: 3636
Originally posted by Vikram Kohli:
Hi All
Happy Independance day to all
But let me ask all ranchers from India,a couple of Question :-
1) What is the significance of the 15-Auagust to you?
2) How are you contributing to your country?
3) Does our country on right track of Development?


What are your replies, Vikram Paaji?
[ August 11, 2006: Message edited by: Chetan Parekh ]

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Sunil Kumar Gupta
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Joined: Aug 26, 2005
Posts: 824
Originally posted by Vikram Kohli:

1) What is the significance of the 15-Auagust to you?
2) How are you contributing to your country?
3) Does our country on right track of Development?



1)May be i am wrong, but now a days, the significance of 15-Aug is that it's a holiday.
2)If you are doing well in your personal life, professional life it means you are contributing to your country. The efforts to make a country better place to live should start from your own place.
3)Well, I am not big enough to answer this question. It might be, but I am not sure.


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MInu
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 09, 2003
Posts: 517
Indian independence day-august 15

Lets remember the great Patriots who laid down their lives for our Independence.





Jai Hind.


God Gave Me Nothing I Wanted<br />He Gave Me Everything I Needed<br /> - Swami Vivekananda
Pradeep bhatt
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 27, 2002
Posts: 8919

1) What is the significance of the 15-Auagust to you?
Holiday
2) How are you contributing to your country?
By not being corrupt like Laloo, natwar, Jaayalalitha, Deve Gowda, Dharam Singh, Venkaiah Naidu
3) Does our country on right track of Development?
yes in the reverse directtion :cool


Groovy
Sumit Chopra
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 26, 2006
Posts: 176
A very happy independence day to all my countrymen.

Let us remember and thank all the great freedom fighters who fought and sacrificed so much for the country.

I am personally relatively satisified the way country is moving ahead. Sure there can be lot of improvements and there will be. But do not forget that there is so much diversity in India languages, religions, castes, customs, traditions ... that it is like having different nations within a nation. Everybody has his own views and considering this structure collectively we are doing quite well.

May be we are not developing as fast as may be China, but the most important thing about India is that we are a free country and a democracy. Everybody is free and has his rights. I think that is one of the most important things . Most of us probably are not that old to have been lived in colonial era, so we do not know what it is not be free. We tend to take freedom for granted and do not realize its importance.

Freedom is the most important thing for a nation and that is why 15th August is the most important day for India and will remain forever.
vidya sagar
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Joined: Mar 02, 2005
Posts: 580
Happy Independence day
Chetan Parekh
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Joined: Sep 16, 2004
Posts: 3636
See who is protecting India.



Raghav Sam
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Joined: Apr 12, 2001
Posts: 412
Happy independence day to all Indians!
Hope as usual it passes off peacefully in the wake of so many threats.

1) Certainly, I am proud of my country and it touches my life wherever I am.
2) Contribution: May be not in a big way, but yes whatever I can. Currently I am out of India and the best I can do is to spread her cultural goodness.
3) An emphatic YES! A lot more to do still, but right on track, no doubt.
Sameer Jamal
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 16, 2001
Posts: 1870
1) What is the significance of the 15-Auagust to you?
When I was a student, 15th August does meant a lot to me starting the day with participation in all school rallies with going to stadium participating in flag hoisting and visiting old age homes and lot of fun and servicing activities.
In my professional life really it�s just a holiday to me.

2) How are you contributing to your country?
Again in my college days I�ve participated in loads of activities including various National service scheme camps, organizing events for orphans and disabled peoples, contributing my pocket money in help age India etc.
In my professional life only by paying tax nothing else.

3) Does our country on right track of Development?
I think yes but little bit slower.
Chetan Parekh
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 16, 2004
Posts: 3636
Hey neighbour Adeel Ansari, Happy Indepandance Day to you too!!!
[ August 11, 2006: Message edited by: Chetan Parekh ]
Vikram Kohli
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 27, 2005
Posts: 174
Originally posted by Chetan Parekh:


What are your replies, Vikram Paaji?

[ August 11, 2006: Message edited by: Chetan Parekh ]


1)significance of the 15-August:- Holiday.
2)How are you contributing to your country:- just follows my social responsibility by not throwing garbage on the road and following traffic rules.
3)Does our country on right track of Development:- still a lot to be done. Farmer conditions are not good in out country(especially small farmers).
Arjunkumar Shastry
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Joined: Feb 28, 2005
Posts: 986
Other countires like Bahrain and South Korea too will be celebrating Independence day on August 15.Hope people there too have taken a long vacation.




Namma Suvarna Karnataka
basha khan
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Joined: Jan 26, 2002
Posts: 516
Originally posted by Chetan Parekh:
See who is protecting India.





Cool pic
Rajah Nagur
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Joined: Nov 06, 2002
Posts: 239
Happy Independece Day to everybody.

59 years have been passed. Lets wish future will be safe and peaceful.

Hope terrorism ends soon, India wins the 2007 worldcup cricket , bollywood gets an oscar etc, & soon we will be a developed country.


You can't wake a person who is <b><i>pretending</i></b> to be asleep.<br />Like what <b>"it"</b> does not like - <i> Gurdjieff </i>
Dave Lenton
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Joined: Jan 20, 2005
Posts: 1241
My country doesn't really have an independence day (unless you counted when the Romans left), so it is interesting to see the excitement about independence days in other countries.

For those with an independence day, do you think that it will become less important to remember as time goes by, and it becomes old history, or do you think it retains some kind of useful importance relevant to modern life?

Also, how do the independence celebrations go down with people from the country you became independent from? For example, I wonder what it is like to be British in the US or India during their independence days! I imagine that they can happily join in the celebrations, but it may be a bit weird. Perhaps there is a large difference between these two examples given the difference in how independence happened.
[ August 14, 2006: Message edited by: Dave Lenton ]

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Arjunkumar Shastry
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Joined: Feb 28, 2005
Posts: 986
Originally posted by Dave Lenton:

For those with an independence day, do you think that it will become less important to remember as time goes by, and it becomes old history, or do you think it retains some kind of useful importance relevant to modern life?

I think in India after 59 years ,from common man's point its just a another holiday where shopping malls give attractive offers(buy one get two free),families plan for some long vacation and elderly in 80s becoming nostalgic about that 'golden period'(first 10/15 years after independence).
From govt. perspective,its an important day where Prime minister gives 'message' to countrymen to become self-reliant,countribute to country's progress and help the needy people and not to forget those martyrs .

Also, how do the independence celebrations go down with people from the country you became independent from?

As you are from Britain,you should answer this question.
Rajah Nagur
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 06, 2002
Posts: 239
Originally posted by Dave Lenton:

For those with an independence day, do you think that it will become less important to remember as time goes by, and it becomes old history, or do you think it retains some kind of useful importance relevant to modern life?

The importance and significance of independence celebrations will be definitely retained. I don't think it will diminish as time goes.
There is some sense of excitement, pride to be part of celebrations. This is a National festival, barring all caste, creed, religion. Atleast on this day people think of nation forgetting problems concering themselves, forgetting enemity etc. Media will have a huge role to play to keep the spirit alive for the future generations. Media always plays a postive/negative role for any events concering masses and it is the strongest influence.
Originally posted by Dave Lenton:

Also, how do the independence celebrations go down with people from the country you became independent from? For example, I wonder what it is like to be British in the US or India during their independence days! I imagine that they can happily join in the celebrations, but it may be a bit weird. Perhaps there is a large difference between these two examples given the difference in how independence happened.

Only an Indian British can comment on this. I was born much after India got independent and never seen any British in any Independence celebrations.

...just my thoughts.
Pradeep bhatt
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Joined: Feb 27, 2002
Posts: 8919

What is the point in these celebrations where there is so much corruption and terrorism.
Dave Lenton
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Joined: Jan 20, 2005
Posts: 1241
Originally posted by Arjunkumar Shastry:
As you are from Britain,you should answer this question.
Sorry, I meant Britons in India or Britons in the US.

I remember hearing about someone I know (from England) on holiday in the US who walked around all day wondering why people were giving her funny looks. Turned out that she was not only wearing a t-shirt with the Union Flag on it, but it was July the 4th. I suppose they couldn't work out if it was an insult or a joke!
vishwa venkat
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Joined: Nov 22, 2003
Posts: 185
Happy Independance Day!


Celebrating Independance Day means a lot, showing the world our uniteness and respect to our freedom fighters, encouraging young Indian army forces, hoping future years with terror-free, wishing to have home,food and cloth for every Indian...so many...countless..
Marcus Green
arch rival
Rancher

Joined: Sep 14, 1999
Posts: 2813
Many years ago I was at a Summer camp in the US and there was some tradition that on the US independence day the British camp counsellors would run up the Union Flag (flag of the UK) first thing in the morning and then the Americans would take it down later on and put up the stars and stripes (or some such jolly japes).


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R K Singh
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Joined: Oct 15, 2001
Posts: 5371
Originally posted by Dave Lenton:
My country doesn't really have an independence day (unless you counted when the Romans left), so it is interesting to see the excitement about independence days in other countries.


Actually to feed nationalism to its public, all Govt. needs some kind of propaganda.
And celebrating Independence Day is one of them.

For Britain, might be celebrating Queen's Birthday would come under same categary.

For example, I wonder what it is like to be British in the US or India during their independence days!
I might be wrong but feeling would be happiness of getting a leave and watching celebration, like Hindus getting leave for Good Friday or Christmas or ID.


"Thanks to Indian media who has over the period of time swiped out intellectual taste from mass Indian population." - Chetan Parekh
Dave Lenton
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Joined: Jan 20, 2005
Posts: 1241
Originally posted by Singh:
For Britain, might be celebrating Queen's Birthday would come under same categary.
Normally this doesn't have large national celebrations, although the recent Jubilee did have a lot of events associated with it.

There has been talk of making St George's day a national celebration for England (not Britain though, the others have their own national saint days), but most people don't really care about it that much. St Patrick's day gets more attention.

We have a number of national holidays during the year, but these are "Bank Holidays", and so are not seen as a national celebrations - we don't really have any events to celebrate the UK or Britishness. This probably either partially causes or is partially caused by the strange English tendency to see patriotism as slightly distasteful.

----
Apologies for shortening your name. When I attempt to post, I receive a message saying that "R" in "Originally posted by R K Singh" is not allowed because it is a bad abbreviation of "are"!
R K Singh
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Joined: Oct 15, 2001
Posts: 5371
Originally posted by Dave Lenton:
Apologies for shortening your name. When I attempt to post, I receive a message saying that "R" in "Originally posted by R K Singh" is not allowed because it is a bad abbreviation of "are"!


Its OK. And actually I like to be addressed by my surname.

we don't really have any events to celebrate the UK or Britishness. This probably either partially causes or is partially caused by the strange English tendency to see patriotism as slightly distasteful.

It may be becasue of rule of monarchy.

In general, in monarchy, you are suppose to be loyal to the ruler, not to the geographical area ruled by ruler.
Dave Lenton
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Joined: Jan 20, 2005
Posts: 1241
Originally posted by Singh:
Its OK. And actually I like to be addressed by my surname.
That's good, it looks like people will have problems quoting your initials.
It may be becasue of rule of monarchy.

In general, in monarchy, you are suppose to be loyal to the ruler, not to the geographical area ruled by ruler.
Possibly, although I think there is more to it then that.

The Scots and Welsh are very proud of their nationality, but the English seem less so. We get very excited when it comes to sport, but otherwise it is very rare to see the English flag being flown and people talking about being proud to be English. This may in part be because patriotic/nationalistic views have been often used in propaganda by far-right not very popular political parties, so people perhaps don't want to be too pro-English in case they are seen as being racist.

Also we're probably less openly proud then the Scots and Welsh because sometimes they feel the need to assert their role within the UK. The UK is so much dominated population-wise by England that Scotland and Wales like to talk about themselves a lot to make up for it (Northern Ireland is a bit more complicated).

The main reason is most likely modesty, which is seen to be good in English culture. Saying things like "My country is so good because of X", "I love my flag" or "we're the best nation on the planet" and so on would often seen as showing off or tacky. Its not that the English don't think that England is good, but that it is seen as lacking in good taste to say it too loudly or to much!
[ August 22, 2006: Message edited by: Dave Lenton ]
R K Singh
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Joined: Oct 15, 2001
Posts: 5371
Originally posted by Dave Lenton:
The main reason is most likely modesty, which is seen to be good in English culture. Saying things like "My country is so good because of X", "I love my flag" or "we're the best nation on the planet" and so on would often seen as showing off or tacky. Its not that the English don't think that England is good, but that it is seen as lacking in good taste to say it too loudly or to much!


Modesty comes with power and greatness.
Actually when you are best, you do not need to remind that everytime

I heard that there was a time when sun would not set in Queen's empire.(And it was not very long ago, that generation must be still living).
Marcus Green
arch rival
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Joined: Sep 14, 1999
Posts: 2813
I remember being in (Western?) Australia and there was a public holiday for the Queens Birthday. This was quite amusing as there is no equivalent holiday in the UK.
R K Singh
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Joined: Oct 15, 2001
Posts: 5371
Originally posted by Marcus Green:
I remember being in (Western?) Australia and there was a public holiday for the Queens Birthday. This was quite amusing as there is no equivalent holiday in the UK.


Ruling over a country is different from ruling own country.

I was shocked when I came to know that Australia is still under Queen's rule. (some 2-3 yrs back I came to know that.)
Any Australian may answer this. Is it still under Queen's rule ? Because I saw Queen's face on their currency.
Rajah Nagur
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Posts: 239
28 States, 7 Union Territories, 1618 Languages, 6400 Castes, 52 Tribes, 6 Religions, 6 Ethinic groups, 29 Major festivals and One Country INDIA.

Wow... India is great..Integrity in Diversity
Chetan Parekh
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Joined: Sep 16, 2004
Posts: 3636
Originally posted by Rajah Nagur:

Wow... India is great..Integrity in Diversity




Dave Lenton
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Joined: Jan 20, 2005
Posts: 1241
Originally posted by Singh:
I was shocked when I came to know that Australia is still under Queen's rule. (some 2-3 yrs back I came to know that.)
The relationship between the Queen and the countries which have her as head of state is a complex one.

Technically she does rule the countries, but in reality she doesn't. In each of these countries there is an unspoken rule that the Queen will not interfere in politics. It does happen occasionally, but it is very rare, and I doubt it will ever happen again.

The Queens role now is more of a ceremonial ambassador. She tries to keep the various Commonwealth countries friendly with each other and does occasional charity work. She also acts as advisor to the UK Prime Minister, who she has weekly meetings with. As she has been on the throne for a long time, she has experience of dealing with many Prime Ministers, and some have said that they find these meetings useful. This may change when her rule ends though.

Why do some of the Commonwealth countries bother to have a monarch if she doesn't have any power? Partially its tradition. This is most true in the UK, but also to a lesser degree in other countries. Its one of the oldest monarchies in history, and a lot of people like the idea of being connected to that. This tradition also brings in a lot of tourist trade in some areas. Partially it is because its something which several countries have in common - something to link us together. Partially it is also to do with politics - having a powerless head of state means that our head of government can't have too much power by combining both roles.
[ August 23, 2006: Message edited by: Dave Lenton ]
R K Singh
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Joined: Oct 15, 2001
Posts: 5371
Originally posted by Dave Lenton:
The relationship between the Queen and the countries which have her as head of state is a complex one.

Technically she does rule the countries, but in reality she doesn't. In each of these countries there is an unspoken rule that the Queen will not interfere in politics. It does happen occasionally, but it is very rare, and I doubt it will ever happen again.


I might be wrong, but how much I know, in early 1900s British agreed for this model in India also.
But some of the leaders of that time demanded "Complete Freedom" (Lokmanya Tilak's slogan "Purna Swaraj")

But I think Australia was different case.
AW they were british so they might have agreed to be under Queen's rule at that time.

Why do some of the Commonwealth countries bother to have a monarch if she doesn't have any power? Partially its tradition.
How much I know, its not tradition.
It is the degree of freedom you got from Queen.
Marcus Green
arch rival
Rancher

Joined: Sep 14, 1999
Posts: 2813
I suspect the term that should be used is not rule, which implies making rules/laws but reign which has less of an implication of exercising powers.

To quote from Wikipedia
"On 6 November 1999, Australians rejected a proposal to replace the Queen with a President ..."

Which is probably more a comment on Australian Politics that the desirability of having the Queen as head of state.
Dave Lenton
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Joined: Jan 20, 2005
Posts: 1241
Originally posted by Marcus Green:
Which is probably more a comment on Australian Politics that the desirability of having the Queen as head of state.
I suspect that there is a fairly similar view there as here in the UK - that the current system may be flawed, but we don't want to risk having something worse if it ever got changed.
R K Singh
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Joined: Oct 15, 2001
Posts: 5371
hmm.. so now we know.

Commonwealth Realm is collection of countries that accepts Queen as head of their state.(Practically Queen does not interfere much in the politics of these country but I think legally she can).

Commonwealth countries are collection of countries that were part of British Colony and they choose voluntary to be part of this organisation.

I think, no body wants to change the sysytem now!
David O'Meara
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Joined: Mar 06, 2001
Posts: 13459

Which is probably more a comment on Australian Politics that the desirability of having the Queen as head of state.

The unfortunate part of the republic debate in Australia is that rather than being a real movement, it is a political stunt pulled out by the politicians any time they want to detract attention from other matters. Changing the Australian flag is another one. That isn't to say that there isn't a real republic movement, just that I believe it is toothless from being a toy of the politicians.

The Governor General is the Queen's representative in Australia, but I think care is taken to keep the position low key and largely ceremonial, even when attending to official duties. One example is the sacking of the Menzies government many years ago, where the official action came from the GG, but this is represented as the final step rather than the official step in the procedure.

I think that if the Queen tried to impose any form of rule on Australia then there would be a serious republic movement and real discussion. Therefore it is easier to keep things civil where the Queen agrees not to rule and we agree not succeed. And tea, drinking tea is also important.

Oops, this is political. More pie!
Dave Lenton
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Joined: Jan 20, 2005
Posts: 1241
Originally posted by Singh:
Commonwealth Realm is collection of countries that accepts Queen as head of their state.(Practically Queen does not interfere much in the politics of these country but I think legally she can).
Almost. There are some members of the Commonwealth of Nations who do not have the Queen as head of state - India is one example! Those which do have the Queen as head of state are called Commonwealth Realms. The Commonwealth Realms are a subset of the Commonwealth.

The Queen is the head of the Commonwealth though, which is an almost entirely ceremonial position. Interestingly she has said that this role isn't necessarily inherited, so it may not pass on to her heir.
Commonwealth countries are collection of countries that were part of British Colony and they choose voluntary to be part of this organisation.
Yeah, pretty much. They were all parts of the British Empire. When the Empire ended as various countries gained independence, the Commonwealth was created as an alternative. The idea was that even if the various parts of the Empire are no longer ruled as one country, they still have a lot in common and so there is a good opportunity to have an organisation which allows them to cooperate with each other.

The one exception is Mozambique, which was never part of the Empire, but which was admitted as a special case because of its historic links to South Africa.
[ August 24, 2006: Message edited by: Dave Lenton ]
Sumit Chopra
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Joined: May 26, 2006
Posts: 176
Originally posted by Dave Lenton:
Yeah, pretty much. They were all parts of the British Empire. When the Empire ended as various countries gained independence, the Commonwealth was created as an alternative. The idea was that even if the various parts of the Empire are no longer ruled as one country, they still have a lot in common and so there is a good opportunity to have an organisation which allows them to cooperate with each other.

The one exception is Mozambique, which was never part of the Empire, but which was admitted as a special case because of its historic links to South Africa.

[ August 24, 2006: Message edited by: Dave Lenton ]


Thanks for increasing my GK.
Chetan Parekh
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Joined: Sep 16, 2004
Posts: 3636
Originally posted by Rajah Nagur:
28 States, 7 Union Territories, 1618 Languages, 6400 Castes, 52 Tribes, 6 Religions, 6 Ethinic groups, 29 Major festivals and One Country INDIA.

Wow... India is great..Integrity in Diversity


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subject: Happy Indepandance Day(15-August)