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c++ api

Nikos Stavros
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Joined: Feb 24, 2006
Posts: 243

I like the api documentation for Java and have been using java for 2 years. I am now planning to learn c++ but I seem to find the api documentation easier to read and find out what I want in the java api. what are your thoughts on this


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Ernest Friedman-Hill
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Joined: Jul 08, 2003
Posts: 24184
    
  34

Ummmm.... that there is no official C++ API for most of the things that Java has an API for? The C++ standard library is pretty spare compared to Java's, and there's certainly no official online documentation, the way there is for Java.

C++'s standard library represents a lot more than classes you can use; it represents a whole way of programming. It's a way that's best learned from a good teacher, or failing that, some good books. You simply can't just stumble into some class descriptions and start using them -- you're likely to miss the whole point.


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Nikos Stavros
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Joined: Feb 24, 2006
Posts: 243

Thanks for your advice,

I was wondering if anyone knew how similar GUI creation was in c++ to Java.I am fairly good at Java GUI programming
Gregg Bolinger
GenRocket Founder
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Joined: Jul 11, 2001
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    6

Originally posted by Nikos Katsikanis:
Thanks for your advice,

I was wondering if anyone knew how similar GUI creation was in c++ to Java.I am fairly good at Java GUI programming


It depends on the GUI toolkit you use. And in fact, the same can be said for Java since there are two legitimate contenders; Swing & SWT/JFace.

As far as C++ GUI toolkits, there a a lot. Plus you get the added benefit that while there are some cross platform GUI toolkits for C++, there are even more platform specific toolkits available.


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Mike Van
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Joined: Apr 06, 2006
Posts: 83
Originally posted by Nikos Katsikanis:
I like the api documentation for Java and have been using java for 2 years. I am now planning to learn c++ but I seem to find the api documentation easier to read and find out what I want in the java api. what are your thoughts on this


Wow, moving from Java TO C++. Usually people move in the other direction. That said, you may want to consider starting with the old-standby, K&R C++. I had a lot of fun with it. As far as API's go, you're going to have to pick a toolkit first, then use the API for that toolkit.

Because C++ code compiles to a specific platform, most of the libraries you'll find also must be compiled to a specific platform. While there are a few good cross-platform libraries, that only relieves you of having to re-code, not recompile. Once you choose, are are forced to use, a specific API, you'll know what your API's are.

Good luck.

A friend of mine who also made the move from Java to C++ also decided to trade his home PC in for a Commadore 64, his Prius for a Yugo, and stopped all airplane travel opting instead for trains.


Mike Van
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Greg Charles
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Joined: Oct 01, 2001
Posts: 2850
    
  11

Originally posted by Mike Van:


you may want to consider starting with the old-standby, K&R C++.


Boy, that would be great advice if there were such a book. The best book for learning C is the one by Brian Kernighan and Dennis Ritchie (K&R), the fathers of the C programming language. They never wrote one for C++ though. The equivalent is The C++ Programming Language by Stroustrup, the father of C++. I highly recommend against reading that one though.
Mike Van
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Joined: Apr 06, 2006
Posts: 83
Originally posted by Greg Charles:


Boy, that would be great advice if there were such a book. The best book for learning C is the one by Brian Kernighan and Dennis Ritchie (K&R), the fathers of the C programming language. The equivalent is The C++ Programming Language by Stroustrup, the father of C++. I highly recommend against reading that one though.


Oops, you got me. I was thinking of "The C++ Programmer's Handbook" by Paul J Lucas. Great book, same size as the K&R C book.
 
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