aspose file tools*
The moose likes Blatant Advertising and the fly likes ANNOUNCE:  Speed up your Data-Driven JSF/Seam Application by Two Orders of Magnitude - Part 2 Big Moose Saloon
  Search | Java FAQ | Recent Topics | Flagged Topics | Hot Topics | Zero Replies
Register / Login


Win a copy of Spring in Action this week in the Spring forum!
JavaRanch » Java Forums » Other » Blatant Advertising
Bookmark "ANNOUNCE:  Speed up your Data-Driven JSF/Seam Application by Two Orders of Magnitude - Part 2" Watch "ANNOUNCE:  Speed up your Data-Driven JSF/Seam Application by Two Orders of Magnitude - Part 2" New topic
Author

ANNOUNCE: Speed up your Data-Driven JSF/Seam Application by Two Orders of Magnitude - Part 2

Kito Mann
author
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 11, 2003
Posts: 116
Hello,

I am pleased to announce a new article on JSF Central. In the second installment of this two-part article, Dan Allen continues his discussion of some common performance problems you may encounter when using JSF components, Seam components, and the EL. You'll learn about the set of best practices for eliminating them that led to an improvement of two orders of magnitude in the performance of his application.


Here is an excerpt:

In the first part of this article, I began briefing you on optimizations I made to maximize the responsiveness of a JSF application that I developed out in the field. I cited performance problems caused by casually accessing components from a JSF view, then presented a set of best practices to eliminate this unnecessary overhead. Despite the progress made by the end of the first part, you had not yet witnessed the two orders of magnitude in performance improvement that was promised.

In this part, the additional gains will be achieved by leveraging partial page rendering-provided by the RichFaces JSF component library and by slimming the response. Partial page rendering cuts out the overhead of rerendering the entire page after each user interaction, which turns out to be the real bottleneck in most traditional web applications, and instead redraws only the areas of the page that have changed. Naturally, you want the replacement HTML source to be as condensed as possible. These optimizations allow the responsiveness of a web application to measure up to its desktop counterpart.



Read the full article here: Speed up your Data-Driven JSF/Seam Application by Two Orders of Magnitude – Part 2
Kito D. Mann -- Author, JavaServer Faces in Action
http://twitter.com/kito99  http://twitter.com/jsfcentral
http://www.virtua.com - JSF/Java EE consulting, training, and mentoring
http://www.JSFCentral.com - JavaServer Faces FAQ, news, and info
+1 203-404-4848 x3

Kito D. Mann
Author of JSF in Actionwww.JSFCentral.com - JSF FAQ, news, and info
 
It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
 
subject: ANNOUNCE: Speed up your Data-Driven JSF/Seam Application by Two Orders of Magnitude - Part 2