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Multiple inheritence with interface

Raj chiru
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 12, 2008
Posts: 142

In preceding code how to provide implementation of add() in Test class
Seetharaman Venkatasamy
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Joined: Jan 28, 2008
Posts: 5575

raj chiru wrote:
In preceding code how to provide implementation of add() in Test class

implementation is nothing but writting the logic(coding) for a method


Eric Mission

Joined: Apr 22, 2009
Posts: 22
simple, you can't so, you don't. That isn't an issue when following the javabean convention...

to infinity and beyond
Campbell Ritchie

Joined: Oct 13, 2005
Posts: 45251
You have a collision. Collisions between interface methods can always be resolved providing the following three conditions apply:
  • 1: The methods have the same signature. (Otherwise it is overloading and not a collision at all).
  • 2: The methods have compatible intent (see below).
  • 3: The methods have the same return type. (You will have to check in the Java Language Specification for the exact details.)
  • You are violating no 3 here, and it will never compile.
    This is overloadingAnd this is incompatible intentObviously the WackyArithmetic#add method is only suitable for jokes, but I challenge you to implement both those interfaces in accordance with their specifications given.

    Have a look at these three add methods: note that the first is intentionally given a vague specification so both sub-interfaces can implement it differently, but still be compatible in intent. 1 2 3
    I agree. Here's the link:
    subject: Multiple inheritence with interface
    jQuery in Action, 3rd edition