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Alternative Job Prospects

Sumit Bisht
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 02, 2008
Posts: 329

Given the bleak status of indian job market, what alternatives exist for an unemployed/fresher/student with java (se/ee/me) experience.

tuition
project training
temporary jobs -?
Start up a java institute

Obvoiusly this would be different in different cities(tier-1, tier-2), and also depend upon level of expertise of the individual.

So what is your take about this and if possible, please share about the applicability of the same in context of your city.
Joe Harry
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 26, 2006
Posts: 9243
    
    1

Since you are one of the three that you mentioned student/fresher/unemployed, my question is why don't you try for any other job in a line other than IT? India does not only do IT!


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arulk pillai
Author
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 31, 2007
Posts: 3216

-- You can try for part-time volunteer work in your field. If you do well and in luck, this could open doors for paid work. It will also look good on your resume. It will also add to your experience.
-- You can perform part-time or casual work in any other fields (e.g. tutoring, skilled or unskilled work) to get some income, but spend at least 1-3 hours each day to make yourself more employable (self-taught projects, volunteer work, open-source contribution, etc) in your chosen field and send applications looking for paid or volunteer work in your chosen career.
-- Constantly review your resume and find ways to improve it by adding additional experience gained via volunteer work, etc and listing other achievements in volunteer work, open-source contribution, etc.


In a nut shell, keep at it until you get a break-through. We are living in a very competitive world and try doing things differently to stand-out from your competition. This is what motivated me to write the Java/JEE Resume Companion.


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Sumit Bisht
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 02, 2008
Posts: 329

@Jothi Your comment is really in sync with reality. Being a student, I can afford to look for other avenues.Its just that in this forum, I am seeing a lot of people under similar stress.
@Arulk 1.Well said, but again, open-sourced projects are sometimes managed in a different sense as compared to commercial ones(as we have no time constraint, we tend to over engineer our projects, though it is not true in every sense)
2. Thanks for your contribution, your book is highly recommended and is one of the best i've come across.
arulk pillai
Author
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 31, 2007
Posts: 3216
Sumit, even if you do not contribute to open-source projects, you can learn from reviewing at others' code. You get a chance to look at real commercial code as opposed to working with "Foo", "Bar", and "HelloWorld" examples . You will also learn how things are wired up. As a beginner, you are better off with self-taught projects, tutorials, and volunteer work. Once you gain some experience and build a level of confidence, you can quickly gain knowledge by looking at others' code. Your contribution will also be reviewed by the fellow developers and you can improve your skills. It will also look good on your resume.
Tim Holloway
Saloon Keeper

Joined: Jun 25, 2001
Posts: 15639
    
  15

India these is a land of many opportunities and much potential. After far too long as a veritable "poster child" for the Third World, the Elephant has begun to awaken. I'd far rather face your challenges than the ones I have to deal with here.

Providing coolie labor for the West has been profitable for India, but in the short term, when the Western economies are weak, you share in their weakness. In the long term, it looks like India and China will eventually grow as the the West shrinks.

Because of this, I recommend looking around to see what possibilities you can aspire to that would allow you to improve your own country, as that's probably the best way to be involved in a "growth industry" with long-term potential and you get the side benefit of seeing life improve for both yourself and fellow-citizens.

India has institutions are were affected little, if any by events in the US and Europe. It has massive amounts of infrastructure that need building and maintaining. And it has the additional challenge of finding solutions that are sustainable, as the many of the older Western ones are not. And it has one of the largest markets in the world to do it in.

The mere thought of Bangalore becoming another Dallas, Texas makes me shudder. India needs Indian solutions, and frankly, the rest of the world needs new solutions as well. Don't just look for a job - look for a way to make the world a better place.


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