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How to remember all these commands

Joe Harry
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 26, 2006
Posts: 9467
    
    2

Guys,

How do you people remember all these Linux commands? Does this come out of experience? I guess yes. Even I would like to take my knowledge on Linux to that level. So would preparing for the RHCE help me what I want to acheive. I'm right now learning the commands like one a day. But keep forgetting them quite often as the environment that I work is windows. It was exactly for this reason that Iinstalled Ubuntu on my machine but even after that I do not quite feel comfortable as I do not feel comfortable yet. So please give me your suggestions.


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Peter Johnson
author
Bartender

Joined: May 14, 2008
Posts: 5838
    
    7

Practice makes perfect. Might I suggest that you avoid Windows and try using only Linux for a while. I know that this is difficult (if not impossible) if your work environment has standardized on Windows and you can't do anything without Outlook or IE. Also, having a cheat-sheet of common commands with their most useful options also helps.

I thought of another option - download and install cygwin on Windows and use it's shell instead of the command prompt when you are on Windows.


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Joe Harry
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 26, 2006
Posts: 9467
    
    2

Thanks for the information. Would studying for RHCE help me anyways? I guess it should as the RHCE is kind of more practically oriented examionation and when I prepare for it, I would then simply use Linux to study for the exam.
Kees Jan Koster
JavaMonitor Support
Rancher

Joined: Mar 31, 2009
Posts: 251
    
    5
Dear Jothi,

I remember them because they are so incredibly useful. I end up using them for all tasks like tracking specific bugs in log files, starting machines or patching Apache output for graphing in Zabbix.

Like Peter says, practice makes perfect.

Also, I find that (apart from the newer ones) these commands are not specific to Linux. I used and use a wide range of unix-like things and there is a nice subset that allows you to basically do everything (sed, awk and grep being the most common ones). That's only three you need to remember. :-)


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Freddy Wong
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 11, 2006
Posts: 959

I can never remember all. I can only remember those that I use often. By staying away from Windows, I guess that should help.

No point studying RHCE or anything of that sort if at the end you don't use Linux as your primary OS. Only by practicing, like what Peter said, can help you to remember.

In case you forget some of the commands, there's always man and Google


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Joe Harry
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 26, 2006
Posts: 9467
    
    2

And exactly that was the reason why I installed Ubuntu as an alternative OS. Nowadays I just log into Ubuntu and fire up a terminal and practice all those that I can. Anyways I have decided to go for RHCE. Hope I too become a Linux guru one day.
Tim Holloway
Saloon Keeper

Joined: Jun 25, 2001
Posts: 16158
    
  21

Be warned: The RHCE is not your typically memorize-and-regurgitate certification exam. It's a heavy-duty test that's been known to send even professional sysadmin's screaming for the exits. It's one of a very small set of certifications that I actually consider worth more than the paper it's printed on.

Unless you're planning a career as a sysadmin, however, there's not really that much benefit to the RHCE or RHCT certs. They're based on practical knowledge of how to set up, maintain, and repair the Red Hat Enterprise Linux operating system, and they're not really geared towards skills in being a day-to-day user or developer. I considered getting an RHCE myself once - I've been running a Linux-based server farm 24x7 for over a decade now. But I couldn't cost-justify the cert, since I'm not applying for sysadmin jobs - it's just a sideline for me.


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Freddy Wong
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 11, 2006
Posts: 959

That's the reason why I only plan to take Linux+ and not RHCE since I consider myself as a software engineer rather than a system admin
Joe Harry
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 26, 2006
Posts: 9467
    
    2

Thanks Freddy. You introduced me to Linu+. Let me explore on it!
 
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