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mad scientist designs: the skillet scarf

 
paul wheaton
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I have a collection of ideas.

But first, the simplest idea ...

So I have this lovely cast iron skillet. A griswold #10. Whatever I cook does well in the middle and kinda wimpy around the edges. I'm thinking that the raised edges of the skillet are acting a bit like a heat sink.

So my inner mad scientist wants to come up with a solution.

My first thought was to use cotton to make a "skillet scarf" to go around the edge and provide an inch or two of insulation. But I now think cotton would catch on fire too easy.

So now I'm wondering about using wool. Perhaps as a bit of felt - sort of smash it into a shape that goes around the skillet.

Would it work? Would it catch on fire?

 
Ernest Friedman-Hill
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Asbestos, the wonder fiber!
 
fred rosenberger
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Have you tried re-positioning the skillet over your heat source?

I'm just thinking... usually, human nature would be to center the skillet over the flame (I assume a gas stove since that's all I've ever used). I would think that naturally the center - the part directly over the flame - would be warmer than the edges.

What happens if you purposely set the skillet way off to the side, so the flame is more under a part with the edge? Granted the far side would be even cooler.

I wonder if instead of a scarf, you simply need a bigger burner.
 
paul wheaton
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This is an electric range. Glass top.

Interesting tidbits of data:

ignition point for cotton: 500 degrees F

ignition point for wool: 1100 degrees F

max temp for electric burner: 500 degrees F (although my source on this is weak)

 
Bear Bibeault
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I wouldn't imagine that 500°F wool smells very good.
 
Brian Legg
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Why not remove the edges entirely and have them curve upwards to keep the contents inside? Think of the shape as a flatter styled wok. This would keep your food in/on the skillet and would eliminate the edges.
 
paul wheaton
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I would imagine that 500 degree wool smells fine after the tenth time of being at 500 degrees. Plus, I suspect the heat will usually be more around 300 for most cooking.

 
paul wheaton
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Brian Legg wrote:Why not remove the edges entirely and have them curve upwards to keep the contents inside? Think of the shape as a flatter styled wok. This would keep your food in/on the skillet and would eliminate the edges.


Like a griddle.

This is another approach.

But the thing is, that once I have perfected "the skillet scarf" I intend to build on these designs for other world domination projects.

 
Joe Ess
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Not quite a scarf, but the same concept
 
It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
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