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What will be the future of my Java development Career?

Aamir Ali Shah
Greenhorn

Joined: Apr 16, 2009
Posts: 3
Hi ,

I am working as Java developer in Small IT Company since 2006. I have successfully complete 3-4 small Java projects. But due to lack of java projects, I have to work in .Net, PHP, Adobe Flex and in Photoshop Projects. So due to lack of java projects I am feeling uncomfortable in current job scenario and thinking for my future where I have to go.
I am feeling that I am lacking behind the Java world and I do not know about the best practices of Java as I have not much Java practical experience.

And Thinking that what I have do for my future how can I improve my java skills.
And is it good for me to work in different platforms.

Need your kind suggestion

arulk pillai
Author
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 31, 2007
Posts: 3216
It is always good to have diverse knowledge. If Java is where your passion is, you can improve your skills via


-- Self-taught projects and tutorials.
-- Open source contribution.
-- Extra volunteer work in exchange for gaining hands-on experience.



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Grishma Dube
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 01, 2003
Posts: 275
I think you mean lack when you say leak........
Vikram Kohli
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 27, 2005
Posts: 174
Hi Aamir,

I got a dream few days back that I am on bench from last few months and Java is gone. And there is a new language in market called Nava. As Nava is pretty new, client want company to develop there project in .Net/PHP/Adobe Flex. Though from last few years I am working as full time java developer, I got the opportunity to work in this new Project as I did some development in VB and Pearl before coming to Java world. I am no longer on bench and working happily in new project.


Vikram PracLabs
matt charron
Greenhorn

Joined: Jun 22, 2009
Posts: 6
Dear Amir,

Yes there is drop in number of Java jobs due to recession and also due to inclination of companies towards Microsoft technologies, specially for new projects.

So, there are two options; either work with diverse technologies or specialize in Java. Be sure that there will be Java jobs for next few years atleast, though Microsoft appears to be leading.
arulk pillai
Author
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 31, 2007
Posts: 3216
The other day I dropped by a large bookshop and I could easily notice that Java shelving area is lot smaller than the .Net shelving area. Has anyone else noticed this or just me? Overall the IT shelving area had been reduced. Looks like more are buying books via online stores.
Chad Fowler
Author
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 19, 2009
Posts: 38
Nothing against Java (seriously---I did years of Java development), but betting your career on a single programming language is a big mistake. I think a lot of programmers overly self-identify with the languages they use. This leads to self-pigeon-holing, which isn't a very wise choice in an industry that is so incredibly susceptible to change.

I'm not throwing stones here. I'm a self-proclaimed Rubyist and identify heavily with the Ruby world. I've been worrying about my own career lately because I am so tied to Ruby. It's scary and I don't think it's good for me.

So my strategy is, even though the Ruby work keeps coming, to look for opportunities to branch out intentionally away from Ruby. I've been working with Erlang and a bit of .NET just to keep myself sharp.

My opinion is that all Java programmers need to be working in parallel on the next strategic technology investment they plan to make. It's time in the adoption curve to start branching out. Might be something that runs on the JVM (Scala, JRuby, Groovy, etc.) but learn something new that changes the way you think about programming. And welcome experiences in other languages or disciplines.

Chad


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http://chadfowler.com
Jeanne Boyarsky
internet detective
Marshal

Joined: May 26, 2003
Posts: 29274
    
140

Chad Fowler wrote:My opinion is that all Java programmers need to be working in parallel on the next strategic technology investment they plan to make. It's time in the adoption curve to start branching out. Might be something that runs on the JVM (Scala, JRuby, Groovy, etc.) but learn something new that changes the way you think about programming. And welcome experiences in other languages or disciplines.

This reminds me of the quote about learning a new language every year.

At the same time, there is value in developing a deeper knowledge of something. You can't be an expert in everything after all. Just not to the point where it is the only thing you can do.


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arulk pillai
Author
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 31, 2007
Posts: 3216
Nothing against Java (seriously---I did years of Java development), but betting your career on a single programming language is a big mistake. I think a lot of programmers overly self-identify with the languages they use. This leads to self-pigeon-holing, which isn't a very wise choice in an industry that is so incredibly susceptible to change.



Agree with you. I remember that 3-4 years ago, your skills will be sought after if you knew EJB. Now a days, it better if you have Java/JEE experience plus ESB, MOM, etc. I think diversification is a good thing rather than specializing.
Pedro Fracarolli
Greenhorn

Joined: Sep 03, 2008
Posts: 20
The problem with learning a lot of programming languages is that this demands a time that you could be using to develop interesting stuff in one programming language. Some people concentrate so much in learning new things that they end up knowing a bunch of tools, but didn't produce anything valuable in any of them.
I think it's useful, though, to learn concepts that are new to the industry. I believe that, once we have the necessary knowledge, we can implement anything in any language, with only a very few specialized exceptions.
 
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