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Pronounciation of "Buzz Words"

Yohan Liyanage
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Joined: Aug 17, 2007
Posts: 132

In the tech world, where the alphabetical soup is cooked, different people tend to pronounce the buzz words in different ways. For example, SQL -> will be S-Q-L or Sequel.

I pronounce like this :
  • SQL -> S-Q-L (I used the term sequel before, but in my country most people use S-Q-L, and I looked like an alien to them when I use sequel )
  • WSDL -> W-S-D-L (Some use Whizdel)
  • SOA -> S-O-A (Recently, I heard people starting to use so-ah)
  • Char -> Char ('Ch' as in Cheese, some say Kar)


  • How do you pronounce these (and other) words?
    [ November 23, 2007: Message edited by: Yohan Liyanage ]

    Yohan Liyanage
    http://blog.yohanliyanage.com
    Srikanth Raghavan
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    Joined: Oct 31, 2005
    Posts: 389
    Let me add two more:

    AJAX - Is it A-Jax?
    SAP - Is it Sap or S.A.P?

    -- Srikanth
    S Dave
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    Joined: Jan 28, 2001
    Posts: 103
    it was funny to hear Java & Jar pronounced as Yava & Yaar in Norway
    David O'Meara
    Rancher

    Joined: Mar 06, 2001
    Posts: 13459

    URL or Earl?
    Oggi Olli
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    Joined: Oct 11, 2007
    Posts: 83
    Originally posted by S Dave:
    it was funny to hear Java & Jar pronounced as Yava & Yaar in Norway


    Thats right Dave, we say Yava in our daily speech. It sounds very strange to pronounce it the English way when speaking Norwegian. In Australia I heard a lot of them saying Javar.
    Oggi Olli
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    Joined: Oct 11, 2007
    Posts: 83
    E-A-R or EAR? What do you say? Mine in bold.
    ankur rathi
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    Joined: Oct 11, 2004
    Posts: 3830
    BPEL or BPel
    Arvind Mahendra
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    Joined: Jul 14, 2007
    Posts: 1162
    XML or Xmmmmmmllll


    I want to be like marc
    Ryan McGuire
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    Joined: Feb 18, 2005
    Posts: 1012
        
        3
    SQL: I've been trying to start a grassroots movements to change the standard pronunciation of this from <sequel> to <squeal>. But seriously... IMO the Microsoft product is <Sequel Server>, but I program it in <S Q L>. So I'm not even internally consistent.

    Char: This is the first few letter of "character" so it should sound like the first syllable of that word: <care>. This holds even if "char" is part of a longer "word". e.g. In a recent SQL stored procedure, I used a <vare care one twenty eight> for a person's last name. That's right... Variable-length Character string is <Vare care>.

    Too bad I'm not consistent with this rule either. That VARCHAR(128) was used in a stored <proc> (rhymes with "knock"), instead of a store <prose> (rhymes with "dose").

    AJAX: Yup... <Ay-jax>.

    URL: <You are ell>. I wouldn't mind using <earl>, but I'd rather make the similarity between URL and URI obvious in their pronunciation as well. If you use <earl> of URL, what do you used for URI, <er-y>? Too many people would use <yuri> and the parallelism would be lost.

    XML: <eks em ell>. I've used <zimmel> once in a humorous context, but too few people understood what I saw talking about.
    [ November 23, 2007: Message edited by: Ryan McGuire ]
    Pat Farrell
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    Joined: Aug 11, 2007
    Posts: 4659
        
        5

    Originally posted by Yohan Liyanage:


    SQL -> will be S-Q-L or Sequel.


    This is usually an indicator of how old the person is. See-quel
    is from folks who learned it back in the time of early Ingres, or read their Codd and Date.




  • WSDL -> W-S-D-L (Some use Whizdel)
  • SOA -> S-O-A (Recently, I heard people starting to use so-ah)
  • Char -> Char ('Ch' as in Cheese, some say Kar)




  • I've heard a lot of Whizdull, but I try not to pronounce it, because I think it is dumb technology.

    Char is the start of charcoal. But its rarely talked about.

    As an industry, we have a serious lack of good terms. All the acronyms made of hard consonants are really unpronounceable.
    Yohan Liyanage
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    Joined: Aug 17, 2007
    Posts: 132

    Originally posted by Pat Farrell:

    This is usually an indicator of how old the person is.


    Oh I'm still young, and I used to pronounce it sequel.

    Well, I used a Microsoft SQL Server interactive tutorial sometime (long) back and in that video, they insisted that it is pronounced as sequel, not S-Q-L (don't know whether they still insist on that). That's how I started to pronounce it that way.

    Anyway, when I got in to the university, almost all of the people seem to use S-Q-L, and I got into using that instead.
    [ November 23, 2007: Message edited by: Yohan Liyanage ]
    Arvind Mahendra
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    Joined: Jul 14, 2007
    Posts: 1162
    Here are way to pronounce more abbr. and phrases in ways that are fun and will win you respect of your peers.

    JSTL as Justill
    FAT as EFF AY TEE
    OK as mmmmkay
    J2EE as J TO(while making invisible arch in sky with index fingers) EEEEE
    nuclear as noo-kyoo-luhr
    Derby as Daaarbee
    'Chicken Soup for the Soul' as Thicken Thoop For the Thoul(with lots and lots of spit)
    [ November 23, 2007: Message edited by: Chunnard Singh II ]
    marc weber
    Sheriff

    Joined: Aug 31, 2004
    Posts: 11343

    Pronounciation of "Buzz Words"...

    I say it: "Booze Vards."


    "We're kind of on the level of crossword puzzle writers... And no one ever goes to them and gives them an award." ~Joe Strummer
    sscce.org
    Stan James
    (instanceof Sidekick)
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    Joined: Jan 29, 2003
    Posts: 8791
    ... or read their Codd and Date

    The 2nd ed is still the only database book I own. I regret I tossed the 1st ed when somebody left the company and gave me their 2nd.


    A good question is never answered. It is not a bolt to be tightened into place but a seed to be planted and to bear more seed toward the hope of greening the landscape of the idea. John Ciardi
    Pat Farrell
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    Joined: Aug 11, 2007
    Posts: 4659
        
        5

    Originally posted by Chunnard Singh II:

    FAT as EFF AY TEE


    FAT as in Fat file systems, aka a bad design back when floppies were 8 inch, and still in use at least ten years after it should have died?
    Its one syllable, rhymes with rat, cat, that.

    More importantly, anyone smart enough to read this forum should spell pronounce it dead and use NTFS or EXT3 or some decent file system.
    Bert Bates
    author
    Sheriff

    Joined: Oct 14, 2002
    Posts: 8883
        
        5
    - "squeal" all the way

    - XML should be pronounced "XML-argh!"

    - how about the guy who created Linux?

    - shouldn't we create an LOA (list of acronyms) for this list?


    Spot false dilemmas now, ask me how!
    (If you're not on the edge, you're taking up too much room.)
    Stefan Evans
    Bartender

    Joined: Jul 06, 2005
    Posts: 1018
    - shouldn't we create an LOA (list of acronyms) for this list?

    No, because there are already too many TLAs in this world
    Yohan Liyanage
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Aug 17, 2007
    Posts: 132

    Talking about TLAs, anyone has any idea what people love so much about "Three Letter Acronyms" ? What about two letters? four letters? The world is filled out of "Three Letter" ones than the rest.
    [ November 26, 2007: Message edited by: Yohan Liyanage ]
    Joe Harry
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    Joined: Sep 26, 2006
    Posts: 9514
        
        2

    Originally posted by S Dave,

    it was funny to hear Java & Jar pronounced as Yava & Yaar in Norway


    Even in Germany J is pronounced as yott...so Java is Yava...


    SCJP 1.4, SCWCD 1.4 - Hints for you, Certified Scrum Master
    Did a rm -R / to find out that I lost my entire Linux installation!
    Gail Mikels
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    Joined: May 07, 2001
    Posts: 634
    Ok - maybe I'm a bit late on this topic, but what about:

    lib (libb or lyb)
    bin (binn or byn)

    ??


    Gail Mikels
    Eugene Abarquez
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    Joined: May 18, 2006
    Posts: 211
    I remember once my American boss told me something about a "jiff" file. It was later that I realized he meant a gif (G-I-F) file.


    There's so much to learn in this industry, and not everybody has the necessary interest.
    Pat Farrell
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    Joined: Aug 11, 2007
    Posts: 4659
        
        5

    Originally posted by Elaine Micheals:

    lib (libb or lyb)
    bin (binn or byn)


    I'm not sure that I'd pronouce your main or alternative versions differently.

    I pronounce lib to rhyme with baby's bib or telling a fib.
    and bin to rhyme with tin can or gordon's gin.
    Ernest Friedman-Hill
    author and iconoclast
    Marshal

    Joined: Jul 08, 2003
    Posts: 24187
        
      34

    Originally posted by Pat Farrell:


    I'm not sure that I'd pronouce your main or alternative versions differently.

    I pronounce lib to rhyme with baby's bib or telling a fib.
    and bin to rhyme with tin can or gordon's gin.


    C'mon man, it's "lyb", like "jibe" or "imbibe". It's short for "library"!


    [Jess in Action][AskingGoodQuestions]
    Eugene Abarquez
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    Posts: 211
    Bin is not even an acronym, it's a word. Why the hell would you pronounce it as bine that rhymes with vine?
    Ernest Friedman-Hill
    author and iconoclast
    Marshal

    Joined: Jul 08, 2003
    Posts: 24187
        
      34

    Originally posted by Eugene Abarquez:
    Why the hell would you pronounce it as bine that rhymes with vine?


    ... because it's short for "binary"?

    Kids today. Tsk.
    Yohan Liyanage
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    Joined: Aug 17, 2007
    Posts: 132

    Originally posted by Eugene Abarquez:
    I remember once my American boss told me something about a "jiff" file. It was later that I realized he meant a gif (G-I-F) file.


    Yeah. I had the same confusion sometime back. Now I'm also using "jiff" for GIF. I think thats pretty common out there.

    How about JPEG ? Some call it "Jay-Peg". Some call J-P-E-G.
    Eugene Abarquez
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    Joined: May 18, 2006
    Posts: 211
    Originally posted by Ernest Friedman-Hill:


    ... because it's short for "binary"?

    Kids today. Tsk.


    Really? My bad. Hehehehe.

    I thought it's like recycle bin. Or is it recycle "bine" too? Now I'm confused.
    [ November 28, 2007: Message edited by: Eugene Abarquez ]
    Eugene Abarquez
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    Joined: May 18, 2006
    Posts: 211
    Originally posted by Yohan Liyanage:


    Yeah. I had the same confusion sometime back. Now I'm also using "jiff" for GIF. I think thats pretty common out there.

    How about JPEG ? Some call it "Jay-Peg". Some call J-P-E-G.


    Spelling out J-P-E-G is just too long to say in a conversation. I prefer "jay-peg".
    Arvind Mahendra
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    Joined: Jul 14, 2007
    Posts: 1162
    Originally posted by Pat Farrell:


    FAT as in Fat file systems, aka a bad design back when floppies were 8 inch, and still in use at least ten years after it should have died?
    Its one syllable, rhymes with rat, cat, that.

    More importantly, anyone smart enough to read this forum should spell pronounce it dead and use NTFS or EXT3 or some decent file system.


    FATS are still very much in use. particularly on smaller hard disks, and they are supposed to be faster(I think it uses linked lists for data access as opposed to NTFS which is supposed to use B-Trees. but of course with todays computing power it doesn't matter much) and have better recovery chances in the event of a catastrophe. FAT I believe also has better encryption and thereby considered more secure.
    My pen drives are all FAT formatted. I think there is even something called exFAT which is supposed to be like a "FAT 64".
    Yohan Liyanage
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    Joined: Aug 17, 2007
    Posts: 132

    Originally posted by Chunnard Singh II:

    FATS are still very much in use. particularly on smaller hard disks, and they are supposed to be faster(I think it uses linked lists for data access as opposed to NTFS which is supposed to use B-Trees. but of course with todays computing power it doesn't matter much)


    Yes, FAT is usually faster in smaller hard disks, but when it comes to large ones, NTFS is faster than FAT, and it also saves the disk space as well. When the volume size gets larger, FAT file systems tend to use a cluster size which is many times more than the NTFS cluster size. (Not to mention that FAT16 supports only upto 4GB and FAT32 upto 32GB -except some special cases- volume sizes. NTFS is said to support upto 2TB volumes.)

    Originally posted by Chunnard Singh II:

    and have better recovery chances (FAT) in the event of a catastrophe.


    This article says that NTFS has better recoverability than FAT.

    Originally posted by Chunnard Singh II:

    FAT I believe also has better encryption and thereby considered more secure.


    Well, I can't agree on this one as well. I think NTFS provides more security than FAT. (It was one of the things which Microsoft used to persuade Windows users to migrate from FAT32 to NTFS back then).

    One last thought : This should be discussed on a seperate thread. (I think this violates 'Meaningless Drivel' theme )
    [ November 29, 2007: Message edited by: Yohan Liyanage ]
    Ernest Friedman-Hill
    author and iconoclast
    Marshal

    Joined: Jul 08, 2003
    Posts: 24187
        
      34

    Originally posted by Eugene Abarquez:


    Really? My bad. Hehehehe.

    I thought it's like recycle bin. Or is it recycle "bine" too? Now I'm confused.



    Nope, it's recycle bin, like tin or pin or win.

    The truth is that most everybody says "bin" for the directory name, too; I was just explaining why somebody MIGHT say it the other way.

    UNIX directory names are really short because the folks who designed UNIX were consciously writing a small system for a small-memory, small-storage machine, saving bytes wherever they could.

    So we got /lib (libraries), /bin ("binaries", meaning executable programs), /usr (which stands for UNIX System Resources, even though everybody pronounces it "user"), /tmp (temporary files), /dev (device files), /etc (miscellaneous configuration files) ... all these three-letter directory name abbreviations.

    Some of the system calls have weird names too, where they abbreviated even though it seems silly. The system call to create a file is called "creat" -- with no "e" at the end.

    The original UNIX "spell" program stored a 60,000 word English dictionary in about 4000 bytes(!) via some amazing programming tricks. It was Andy McIlroy, I think, who accomplished this. There's a great story about it in Jon Bentley's "Programming Pearls".
    Alan Wanweird
    Greenhorn

    Joined: Apr 30, 2007
    Posts: 25
    We have a project "FCL" which seems to have become commonly pronounced "Fucall".

    Unfortunately the next stage of the project is "FCM".. and the way *thats* goign to be pronounced pretty much some up how we all regard the users!
    Yohan Liyanage
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    Joined: Aug 17, 2007
    Posts: 132

    Originally posted by Alan Wanweird:
    Unfortunately the next stage of the project is "FCM".. and the way *thats* goign to be pronounced pretty much some up how we all regard the users!


    Nice one Alan !!!
     
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