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How climate is behaving at your end

Vikram Kohli
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 27, 2005
Posts: 174
Hi All,

Its not raining. Its too hot . I am living in Delhi(India). Every year temperature is hitting new heights. Summers are getting longer. Winters are getting shorter. Night's are also too hot. How climate is behaving at your end..?

Vikram PracLabs
Mark Reyes
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 09, 2007
Posts: 426
Hi,

Its stormy right now here Manila(Phil). Classes were already cutoff.

Our manager advised us to go home early so there's no night out tonight.

We are used to more than 20 typhoon every year that passes in the archipelago but this year CLIMATE CHANGE
has really change the calendar.

Usually April and May are hot summer days but in between summer time there were so may rainy days.

I hope we can still do something about climate change. Heard that our government has created a commission on climate
change but dont know if they can do something.


Sean Clark ---> I love this place!!!
Me ------> I definitely love this place!!!
Rizvan Asgarov
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jan 07, 2009
Posts: 451

Hi All,
The weather is partial windy and hot here (Baku, Azerbaijan). Also meaning of Baku is Winds City.
I invite everybody here...


"Half of the science is to ask question"
Arvind Mahendra
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 14, 2007
Posts: 1162
My end is somewhat inflamed and probably a little irritated. I ate some really spicy chicken last night. I'm drinking a lot of water so that it won't burn so much tomorrow morning.


I want to be like marc
W. Joe Smith
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 10, 2009
Posts: 710
Hot (mid to upper 90's F, sorry I don't know the Celcius conversion) with equally high humidity (dew point in the mid 70's F).

Summer in Iowa, basically.


SCJA
When I die, I want people to look at me and say "Yeah, he might have been crazy, but that was one zarkin frood that knew where his towel was."
Chris Baron
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 21, 2003
Posts: 1049
Germany: too cold for end of june.
Funny, just yesterday i talked with a friend about that climate change is only mentioned if it is to hot for the season.
Robin John
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 10, 2008
Posts: 270

me in canada:

its freaking hot here now.. well we just welcomed summer's first day 3 days back... and it rained just the day before : )... anyways...
Climate change is a very serious and worrying matter to me : ( I am scared.. and I seriously hope and pray that we can DO something about it... but you know what guys.. anything we do.. has to be done by huge numbers, so that it makes an effect to our LOVELY EARTH....

Regards.
Eduardo Bueno
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 04, 2009
Posts: 155
It's damn cold here in Araraquara-SP, Brazil. I have never seen such cold winter in my life. Guess the summer will be extreme too.
By the way, the city is called Sun's dwelling. I think this title won't last much.
Tim McGuire
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 30, 2003
Posts: 820

This past winter was pretty harsh (meaning:normal Minnesota winter after 6 or 7 mild winters) but there are still lots of possums around, which historically did not live in Minnesota. The northern boundaries for many species are expanding northwards here in the states.

The other noticeable effect is that the more evidence points to climate change, the louder the deniers become.
Vikram Kohli
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 27, 2005
Posts: 174
Our country(India) still heavily depends on monsoon. And this year its now official that monsoon will be below normal link. Rain is lifeline to the economy. Is it true in other parts of the world also? I hope and pray that we will get some showers very soon.
Sumit Bisht
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 02, 2008
Posts: 329

Let's hope el nino doesn't wrecks up havoc this time round
Frank Silbermann
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 06, 2002
Posts: 1386
My prediction is that, after heavy investment in R&D, the U.S. will come up with technical solutions that provide cheap green energy. We will then be forced to choose between giving it away for free to the rest of the world thereby losing the economic advantage of our investments (and falling into permanent economic decline), versus upholding our patents and seeing the world destroyed as poorer countries accelerate their deforestation and massive pollution via burning coal (and petroleum).

That's my optimistic forecast. The pessimistic one is that we don't discover a cheap source of green energy and we suffer _both_ the destruction of our economy and the ecology.
Eduardo Bueno
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 04, 2009
Posts: 155
It's said that about 2025 the world will have the capability to live just by solar power. Not that this is going to happen, though. It is a very fresh technology, but people still insist in make money with it, which is sad.
Tim McGuire
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 30, 2003
Posts: 820

I hope that the alternatives come on line soon, but my understanding is that the carbon needed to ruin the climate is already in the air. Once a molecule of C02 is in the atmosphere, it stays there for more than 100 years. So what we are putting up there today will continue to affect things into the year 2110. Even if we stopped _increasing_ our carbon output today, the earth would continue to change. But we can't even stop increasing the carbon we output every year. Heck, we can't even reduce the _rate_ of increase.

Of course, I'm just repeating what the scientists say. My neighbors here seem to have some instinctual knowledge of earth systems because they say this is all hogwash. Since everyone is equal here, their opinions count just as much as those who have spent their entire lives studying the climate.
Sridhar Gudipalli
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 02, 2005
Posts: 120
I am from Hyderabad, India, where it is around 40-45C (112F to 122F) in summer.
Its been around 2 years in US and habituated to this weather.. Now its around 90F-95F (29C-32C) here in KY.
Oh my God!! feeling hot. I am surprised.. how I spent in India......


Sridhar Gudipalli|SCJP 6.0
SCWCD objectives
W. Joe Smith
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 10, 2009
Posts: 710
Sridhar Gudipalli wrote:I am from Hyderabad, India, where it is around 40-45C (112F to 122F) in summer.
Its been around 2 years in US and habituated to this weather.. Now its around 90F-95F (29C-32C) here in KY.
Oh my God!! feeling hot. I am surprised.. how I spent in India......


It is interesting how different it can be. I was in Florida one spring, and it was about 50F, and coming off of an Iowa winter of 0's and below, that was pretty warm. We were all walking around in shorts, T shirts, and sandals, and I saw so many people that live in Florida looking like there was going to be a huge blizzard that day.
Frank Silbermann
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 06, 2002
Posts: 1386
Tim McGuire wrote:I hope that the alternatives come on line soon, but my understanding is that the carbon needed to ruin the climate is already in the air. Once a molecule of C02 is in the atmosphere, it stays there for more than 100 years. So what we are putting up there today will continue to affect things into the year 2110. Even if we stopped _increasing_ our carbon output today, the earth would continue to change. But we can't even stop increasing the carbon we output every year. Heck, we can't even reduce the _rate_ of increase.

Of course, I'm just repeating what the scientists say. My neighbors here seem to have some instinctual knowledge of earth systems because they say this is all hogwash. Since everyone is equal here, their opinions count just as much as those who have spent their entire lives studying the climate.
My understanding is that there definitely is global warming right now, but it's only a theory (but a plausible one) that is being caused by man-made CO2, with many scientists neglecting to examine the theory skeptically because reducing pollution and the burning of non-renewable fossil fuels is a good thing to do regardless.
W. Joe Smith
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 10, 2009
Posts: 710
Frank Silbermann wrote:
Tim McGuire wrote:I hope that the alternatives come on line soon, but my understanding is that the carbon needed to ruin the climate is already in the air. Once a molecule of C02 is in the atmosphere, it stays there for more than 100 years. So what we are putting up there today will continue to affect things into the year 2110. Even if we stopped _increasing_ our carbon output today, the earth would continue to change. But we can't even stop increasing the carbon we output every year. Heck, we can't even reduce the _rate_ of increase.

Of course, I'm just repeating what the scientists say. My neighbors here seem to have some instinctual knowledge of earth systems because they say this is all hogwash. Since everyone is equal here, their opinions count just as much as those who have spent their entire lives studying the climate.
My understanding is that there definitely is global warming right now, but it's only a theory (but a plausible one) that is being caused by man-made CO2, with many scientists neglecting to examine the theory skeptically because reducing pollution and the burning of non-renewable fossil fuels is a good thing to do regardless.


From my understanding global warming is a plausible theory, but not the only one. I had a professor in college that said the only reason we know about the global warming theory is because it is the most dramatic and shocking. He showed us research that seemed to show that while humans have cause a little bit of warming the natural warming and cooling cycles of the planet can move so drastically in either direction that our impact is very small.

I do have to apologize that I don't have any sources for that statement, as I hate saying things like that without sources, but this is a pretty casual thread so I just went with it.
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
Marshal

Joined: Jan 10, 2002
Posts: 60822
    
  65

Austin, TX

7-day forecast, Jun 25, 2009



Cold snap coming on Wednesday -- better break out the parka!

[Asking smart questions] [Bear's FrontMan] [About Bear] [Books by Bear]
Tim McGuire
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 30, 2003
Posts: 820

Well, there is a word "theory" as we use it in popular language, which varies, roughly, between "something I pulled out of my butt" and " something I believe like I believe in the afterlife or like I believe that the Twins are the best team ever"
and there is a word "Theory" which scientists are trained to use when something isn't directly observable or reproducible in a lab, but likely enough that they are going forward with a model based on the best science they have. They have to go forward with their best science in order to build upon it, while expecting the theory to be challenged and refined, but stable enough to build on. So saying "only a theory" is misleading here. and saying "not the only one " is misleading as well, because the scientific community supports the theory. This is because all the data lines up solidly behind it and the underlying physics are solid.

this subforum is great for boosting my # of posts!
Frank Silbermann
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 06, 2002
Posts: 1386
Tim McGuire wrote: So saying "only a theory" is misleading here. and saying "not the only one " is misleading as well, because the scientific community supports the theory. This is because all the data lines up solidly behind it and the underlying physics are solid.
I am skeptical of your claim that "all the data lines up solidly behind it and the underlying physics are solid" -- given that our physical understanding of the weather in general normally doesn't allow us to forecast beyond a week or so. What are your qualifications as a physicist, that you could know this (rather than merely having heard some other layman claim it), to distinguish the situation from my description (of the scientists feeling that cutting down on burning of fossil fuels is a good idea even if the theory isn't true so they might as well support it)?
Sagar Rohankar
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 19, 2008
Posts: 2902
    
    1

Sumit Bisht wrote:Let's hope el nino doesn't wrecks up havoc this time round

Its all because of Global Warming.. I'm in Pune, and this days are known for heavy raining but still no official(Monsoon) rain yet

And if we don't really wake up (specifically we Indians), those days are not so far, when rains comes once in a 2-3 years ..


[LEARNING bLOG] | [Freelance Web Designer] | [and "Rohan" is part of my surname]
Jules Bach
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 28, 2008
Posts: 71
Frank Silbermann wrote:
Tim McGuire wrote: So saying "only a theory" is misleading here. and saying "not the only one " is misleading as well, because the scientific community supports the theory. This is because all the data lines up solidly behind it and the underlying physics are solid.
I am skeptical of your claim that "all the data lines up solidly behind it and the underlying physics are solid" -- given that our physical understanding of the weather in general normally doesn't allow us to forecast beyond a week or so. What are your qualifications as a physicist, that you could know this (rather than merely having heard some other layman claim it), to distinguish the situation from my description (of the scientists feeling that cutting down on burning of fossil fuels is a good idea even if the theory isn't true so they might as well support it)?


'weather' and 'climate' are very different things. They are also different when it comes to our ability to make predictions. While it is true that climate models vary in terms of exact effect, and it is also true that weather forecasts can be wrong, all climate models predict warming. There is a consensus that warming is occurring outside the 'natural cycle' at that humans are causing it. The alternatives to this consensus, whilst perhaps valid in a historical context are becoming increasingly marginalized.

Even the most conservative climate models ones paint a pretty gloomy picture if we continue with 'business as usual'.

It's dark and gloomy here in Cambridge.
Tim McGuire
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 30, 2003
Posts: 820

Frank Silbermann wrote:What are your qualifications as a physicist

Heh.
Do I need to be a physicist to decide to wear white on a hot day or cover a pot that I want to boil faster? That's about the level of complexity of the science here.

Frank Silbermann wrote:that cutting down on burning of fossil fuels is a good idea even if the theory isn't true so they might as well support it


This doesn't make any sense to me. In my experience scientists are pretty insectoid when it comes to their feelings as they relate to their specialties. Why would a scientist who values his career mark himself down as supporting a theory that wasn't true so that some other perceived benefit? Have you heard of many famous scientists that got to where they are by leapfrogging around like this.
Frank Silbermann
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 06, 2002
Posts: 1386
Jules Bach wrote:
'weather' and 'climate' are very different things. They are also different when it comes to our ability to make predictions. While it is true that climate models vary in terms of exact effect, and it is also true that weather forecasts can be wrong, all climate models predict warming. There is a consensus that warming is occurring outside the 'natural cycle' at that humans are causing it. The alternatives to this consensus, whilst perhaps valid in a historical context are becoming increasingly marginalized.

Even the most conservative climate models ones paint a pretty gloomy picture if we continue with 'business as usual'.

It's dark and gloomy here in Cambridge.
I suspect that the solidity of the various climate models fall between conventional physical models and, say, the correlation models used in economics. And though I agree that the evidence for man-made global warming is building, I suspect much of the marginalization of alternative views is due to social and political peer pressure among scientists as much as due to the results of technical research.

That said, I suspect that there _is_ human-caused global warming -- not only due to CO2 but also due to the cutting down of forests (just as goat herding in ancient times accelerated the spread of dry deserts round the Mediterranean Sea). The sad thing is that the West would already have reduced its output of CO2 by a significant proportion if only those countries over the last few decades had not allowed large-scale immigration from the Third World (where historically much less fossil energy tended to be used) to replace the declining native population. Even then, we do need to replace our energy sources, as dependency upon foreign oil has already bled a great deal of wealth and power out of the western nations -- and coal-burning simply poisons everything.

But I also believe that the recent availability of ultra-cheap microprocessors is providing opportunities for renewable energy that simply weren't previously feasible. For example, receptors in solar farms must track the movement of the sun; wind turbines must be adjusted to the ever-varying wind conditions, the farming of oil-producing algae probably requires close monitoring of the growth environment, an electrical grid with millions of distributed little energy producers is probably too complex for human/mechanical tuning without computer processors all over the network. I'm sure that electric/hybrid energy-recapture braking systems require high-speed computer control, just as do our more efficient fuel-injection systems. New battery technology may also rely on computers to control to limit energy surges without preventing rapid recharging.

In other words, we have possibilities that simply weren't available to us during the energy shocks of 1973 and 1978. There is no instant solution at the moment, but there may well be solutions before too long.

The hope is that oil prices remain at current levels for a while -- not so high as to force a world-wide major economic depression (as they were a year ago), but not so low as to kill the incentive for investment in R&D (as they were six months ago).

Robin John
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 10, 2008
Posts: 270

I think, You ppl would have seen this video..

but those who haven't....

YOU SHOULD !

Buy link --> Buy Link

YouTube link --> AfterMath: Population ZERO

Regards.
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://aspose.com/file-tools
 
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