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Prepone: finally in Dictionary

 
R K Singh
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Ten year back I used to be very careful about my english and tried to avoid words that I knew that are only for one particular geography.

And as time passed by, I realize that it is majority who rules, my being correct would not impact at all.

and later I stopped caring for my words.

After all my english is my english ;-)

And today I found that "prepone" is available in wordweb dictionary.

I am sure we will have soon splitted also in dictionary ;-)

I have doubt [purposefully used 'doubt'], what is correct english language?

I also want to write.. please do the needful ..
 
Jim Yingst
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http://www.wordwebonline.com/search.pl?w=prepone

Note where it says "Usage: Asia". A term can be in the dictionary without being in general usage. And what is "correct" will ultimately depend on who you're trying to communicate with. Prepone, splitted and doubt (as used here) are still not well known outside India (and sites with a lot of Indians).
 
Akhilesh Trivedi
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is "casted" ok?
 
Jeanne Boyarsky
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Akhilesh,
What does "casted" mean (that you are asking about.) I've heard it used as in "I casted someone for a role in a play" and "I've casted a fishing line." I think you are asking about a different meaning though.
 
R K Singh
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Originally posted by Jeanne Boyarsky:
I've heard it used as in "I casted someone for a role in a play"


I have never herad of casted

As grown up learning brit english, 'casted' does not exist.

I think I missed the whole point in my first post.

What I feel is that, English is de-facto laguage of international communication.
It will grow as more people will use it.

Lot of people who feel that English is English and should not be changed; will feel panic for its rapid changing words and different usage.

I feel that they should accept that language does not belong to any geography or to a community. They should be ready to accept the fact that though it may be first language for them but still they may need to learn new words/usage from other person/geo.

But what often I see is that they are reluctant to change.

I still remember, back in 1996, people will login to windows but will not open windows explorer, but go to command prompt and type command 'dir' :-|

I understand that, its hard to change or accept someone else idea.

But as I said, pure gold is of no use, to use gold you have to put impurity in the gold.
[ May 30, 2008: Message edited by: R K Singh ]
 
fred rosenberger
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Originally posted by Jeanne Boyarsky:
Akhilesh,
What does "casted" mean (that you are asking about.) I've heard it used as in "I casted someone for a role in a play" and "I've casted a fishing line." I think you are asking about a different meaning though.


i've never heard 'casted someone in a play' - i was a theatre major. everyone i knew would say "he was cast in the play". for whatever that's worth.

aha... see here
[ May 30, 2008: Message edited by: fred rosenberger ]
 
Jeanne Boyarsky
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Originally posted by fred rosenberger:
i've never heard 'casted someone in a play' - i was a theatre major. everyone i knew would say "he was cast in the play". for whatever that's worth.

Fred,
I didn't say it was grammatically correct. Just that I've heard it said.

I think this comes from talking to a lot of people that don't have English as a first language. I hear a number of phrases that make sense even though they aren't "correct." My favorite is the phrase "today-morning". As in "I talked to him today-morning" rather than "I talked to him this morning."
 
Deepak Bala
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I casted an Object to an Integer

As long as the other party can make sense of what you are saying you can also use zulu to communicate
 
Vikas Kapoor
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Originally posted by John Meyers:
...As long as the other party can make sense of what you are saying you can also use zulu to communicate

Exactly!
As long as the other person understands what you are saying that's it.Your purpose is solved. Language is developed itself for communication.If the communication is done then Why do we need to bother about the CORRECT language? Sorry to *all* language professors.

- Facial expression
- Current talk context
- The purpose of meet
- Our skill to understand etc...
If you are not good at english or any other language all these things also ease our communication.
 
John Smith
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Originally posted by Jeanne Boyarsky:
What does "casted" mean


"Casted" means "demoted to lower caste". For example, if you are born as a Kshatriya (a king), you may become an "untouchable" if you accidentally step into elephant dung on the road. That's why people of higher castes in India rarely walk.
 
Deepak Bala
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Originally posted by John Smith:


"Casted" means "demoted to lower caste". For example, if you are born as a Kshatriya (a king), you may become an "untouchable" if you accidentally step into elephant dung on the road. That's why people of higher castes in India rarely walk.


 
Jeanne Boyarsky
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Originally posted by John Smith:
"Casted" means "demoted to lower caste".

Thank you. I did know the word "caste". I didn't think to make it a verb!
 
Akhilesh Trivedi
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Originally posted by Akhilesh Trivedi:
is "casted" ok?


well... i was trying to associate "cast" with "mould/shape"... I used the word in 'squirrel-thread' (I dont see it in my post here. Deleted? :roll: .)

My desktop wordweb for "cast" has an entry...

"Form by pouring (e.g., wax or hot metal) into a cast or mold"
May be 'cast' exists but not 'casted'. :roll:
 
Pradeep bhatt
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Originally posted by Jeanne Boyarsky:

Fred,
I didn't say it was grammatically correct. Just that I've heard it said.

I think this comes from talking to a lot of people that don't have English as a first language. I hear a number of phrases that make sense even though they aren't "correct." My favorite is the phrase "today-morning". As in "I talked to him today-morning" rather than "I talked to him this morning."


I use it quite often. Now I know it is wrong.
 
Jeanne Boyarsky
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Originally posted by Prad Dip:
I use it quite often. Now I know it is wrong.

I wouldn't say it is wrong. Just that it isn't grammatically correct US English. It certainly makes more sense than the "correct" version. I've heard this phrase enough times that it feels right by now
 
Cameron Wallace McKenzie
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Personally, I like pre-owned.

Pre meaning before. So, before something was owned, it would be totally new, like an unowned vehichle.

But somehow, preowned means it has been owned by someone, which you would thing should actually be postowned.

Yes, a pre-owned vehicle. Yes indeed.

-Cameron McKenzie
 
Sridhar Sreenivasan
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"Pre meaning before. So, before something was owned, it would be totally new, like an unowned vehichle."
After reading this truth, I feel I have been cheated. I actually paid for a pre-paid phone card
 
Akhilesh Trivedi
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I understand moderators will not mind if this thread goes meaningful

Came across this new word today
Triskaidekaphobia
 
Akhilesh Trivedi
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Another one...

You will have to be in my shoes to believe me.
 
Pat Farrell
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I think pre-owned sounds so much better than 'used' which the proper non-marketing word.

I love "pre-recorded"
I haven't figured out how to record something and not have that happen in the past when you are playing the recording.
 
Paul Clapham
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Originally posted by Pat Farrell:
I love "pre-recorded"
I haven't figured out how to record something and not have that happen in the past when you are playing the recording.
It just takes a little bit of "pre-planning".
 
Arvind Mahendra
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Originally posted by John Smith:


"Casted" means "demoted to lower caste". For example, if you are born as a Kshatriya (a king), you may become an "untouchable" if you accidentally step into elephant dung on the road. That's why people of higher castes in India rarely walk.


Kshatriyas aren't kings, they are warriors predominantly.
 
Akhilesh Trivedi
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Discomgoogolation:

The term "discomgoogolation" is a combination of the word "discombobulate" and "Google." (As a completely unrelated thought, why isn't "combobulate" a real word?) British Psychologists created the word "discomgoogolation" to mean a "feeling of distress or anxiety when unable to gain immediate information access."

- source.
 
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