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java or .net?

Jyoti Vaskar
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Joined: Jun 30, 2009
Posts: 142
what is better? java or .net ?

in terms of

job scope, package, promotions & also

from the project & companies point of view?

which is the best technology??


thanks
Jyo
Sandeep Awasthi
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Joined: Oct 23, 2003
Posts: 597
I think this is been discussed many times.


Sandeep
Henry Wong
author
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Joined: Sep 28, 2004
Posts: 19074
    
  40


Try both ... to see which you would like better. As a suggestion though, when you try .NET, try C#, it's probably the favorite among .NET developers.

job scope, package, promotions & also


You stand a better chance at a promotion, and better package, if you are good at your job. And a good way to be good at your job is to do something that you like... which goes back to seeing which would you like better.

Henry


Books: Java Threads, 3rd Edition, Jini in a Nutshell, and Java Gems (contributor)
Jyoti Vaskar
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Joined: Jun 30, 2009
Posts: 142
Henry Wong wrote:
Try both ... to see which you would like better. As a suggestion though, when you try .NET, try C#, it's probably the favorite among .NET developers.

job scope, package, promotions & also


You stand a better chance at a promotion, and better package, if you are good at your job. And a good way to be good at your job is to do something that you like... which goes back to seeing which would you like better.

Henry



thank you Henry for your precious advice.

Is there any disadvantage for Java over .net or vice a versa from the project point of view?

which is the better one from the project point of view?
Ulf Dittmer
Marshal

Joined: Mar 22, 2005
Posts: 42951
    
  72
Jyoti Vaskar wrote:Is there any disadvantage for Java over .net or vice a versa from the project point of view?

which is the better one from the project point of view?

This kind of question has no answer in general. Neither is better than the other in all circumstances.
Sumit Bisht
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Joined: Jul 02, 2008
Posts: 329

[Thread hijack removed]
Jyoti Vaskar
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Joined: Jun 30, 2009
Posts: 142
Ulf Dittmer wrote:
Jyoti Vaskar wrote:Is there any disadvantage for Java over .net or vice a versa from the project point of view?

which is the better one from the project point of view?

This kind of question has no answer in general. Neither is better than the other in all circumstances.



Thank you Ulf fot the reply..........
K. Tsang
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Joined: Sep 13, 2007
Posts: 2628
    
    9

Why not add open source software into the mix. Now you have java or .net or OSS.


K. Tsang JavaRanch SCJP5 SCJD/OCM-JD OCPJP7 OCPWCD5 OCPBCD5
Rogerio Kioshi
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Joined: Apr 12, 2005
Posts: 689
Some companies are changing from Java to .NET, unfortunately, for me, that have been studying Java for so long.
But what I see is that the C# language is very similar to Java. So, I think learning both (Java and .NET) would increase your job skills and oportunities.
I think you must dance acording to the music: if you feel learning .NET would be better to your career, go on.
But I also think that, if you are a really good professional, you will get success independently of your choice.



SCEA 5 (part 1), SCBCD, SCWCD, SCJP, CLP, CLS
Joe Ess
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Joined: Oct 29, 2001
Posts: 8997
    
    9

K. Tsang wrote:Why not add open source software into the mix. Now you have java or .net or OSS.


That's an odd distinction to draw. Some OSS is written with Java. Others with .NET. Other projects use neither. Some use more than one language (for example, The Grinder, which is written in Java, but uses Python for scripting). C is the most popular language for OSS development, no doubt due to the influence of GNU/Linux.

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Mike Isano
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Joined: Jan 19, 2007
Posts: 144
Rogerio Kioshi wrote:Some companies are changing from Java to .NET, unfortunately, for me, that have been studying Java for so long.



That's not unfortunate. Every skill you have under java will transfer to .net. The only real difference is getting familiar with visual studio, deploying website (which is a breeze).

I would prefer a very good java developer with no .net experience to develop a .net application over some ".net developer" who just knows how to play with the IDE. If you have one guy who knows the ins and outs of IIS, visual studio, etc he can help get any guys up to speed. But what cannot be helped (as easily) is the lack of core skills of a developer.
Andy Lester
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Joined: Jun 03, 2009
Posts: 61
After a while, it's all just tools, and the question isn't "What tools do you know" but rather "How can you use the tools?"

I once got a resume from a guy named Bruce. I was hiring for a Perl/PHP developer, and Bruce had neither on his resume, but he did have a strong Unix background, and he looked otherwise qualified. So I called him up for an interview, and I explained my concern that he didn't know any PHP or Perl. He said he could learn, and we scheduled an interview for a few days later.

When Bruce came in, he brought in a Perl program that did some sort of graphing, I don't remember what. In the couple of days since he set up the interview, he'd gone and bought a copy of Programming Perl, taught himself quite a bit of the syntax, learned how to install modules from the CPAN, and written some sample programs.

Bruce has been with us for seven or eight years now.

Like I said in another thread, I can train for skills, I can't train attitude or basic programmer aptitude.


The Working Geek, a blog of job hunting and work life for techies. Author of Land The Tech Job You Love. Follow me at @theworkinggeek
Gerardo Tasistro
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Joined: Feb 08, 2005
Posts: 362
I've prefered Java for quite a few reasons:

Legacy issues. I'll put this on the table from the get go. When I started with Java, .NET was in its infancy. So yes there is a learning curve to become acquainted with .NET which I'm not ready to do.

Bias aside let me list the points:

Java runs on Windows. .NET doesn't run on Linux, BSD and OS X. I've done developments for non desktop apps. Like VoIP with Asterisk. So .NET would be a obstruction since all those servers run Linux.

I don't want to have to retrain with every .NET major release. Microsoft has a habit of changing things.

.NET is beneficial if you have a large Microsoft software stack (and your clients use IE). Then you can leverage it and it is probably the reason some companies are moving to .NET In the long run I see it as a drawback. As it locks you to the continuous upgrade path MS sets. I've lived that, got out of that and I'm not planning on going back.

I find the Java frameworks to be more robust and mature than Microsoft's offerings. Take ORM for example. I use Hibernate and NHibernate is a port from the original Java framework. Something I've been seeing as "new" in .NET. So I don't see the benefit of moving to .NET when I already have such tools with Java.
Katrina Owen
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Joined: Nov 03, 2006
Posts: 1367
    
  18
I don't know what the situation is like in other places around the world, but in this quadrant Java, .NET, C, and C++ are not the only languages that provide a rich amount of opportunities.

Ruby had a period of growth and the ruby community is very active (and enthusiastic). Python, too. And PHP.

Not that I'm suggesting that PHP is a good choice

And if you go even less mainstream, there are opportunities that have a lot less takers (or applicants, if you are talking about job openings). Less mainstream often provides more interesting (and well-paid) projects.

Basically, though, it's about what you prefer. If you try both, and you like the tool set better on one side of the fence, then go for it! I have colleagues who are pretty comfortable in .NET, program well in PHP, are complete whizzes in Perl, and who have never written a line of Java. There are others where I work who will whip up fancy user interfaces and complex interactions in javascript, write bash scripts and tcl scripts and play around with all the tools that unix provides to do whatever it is that they decided they wanted to accomplish. There are others who wouldn't touch javascript with a cowpoke. Then there are some who probably shouldn't And one girl is a complete magician when it comes to SQL and stored procedures.

Play with things, try things out, and find your sweet spot. You don't have to make up your mind today.
Andy Lester
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Joined: Jun 03, 2009
Posts: 61
As editor of Perlbuzz.com, I have to point out that Perl is still widely used, and Perl 6's going to have its first big release around April 2010. Perl 6 is going to be taking all the great stuff from Ruby and Python and other advances in programming in the last decade. It's going to be pretty cool.
 
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