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Java jobs, where are they?

Ade Adesanya
Greenhorn

Joined: May 31, 2008
Posts: 6
Hi,
My educational ground is in Corrosion Engineering, I become a Sun Certified Programmer for the Java Platform, SE 5.0 in April 2009 and Sun Certified Web Component Developer for the Java Platform, EE 5 in June 2009, after years (4 years) of trying. Since I got my Certification, I have been looking for job as a Java Programmer or Web Component
Developer in the UK, but I have not been lucky so far.
Can anybody give me advice on how to get a job as a Java Programmer or Web Component
Developer?
Any advice will be much appreciated.

Regards
Ade


SCJP 5.0 SCWCD 5.0
arulk pillai
Author
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 31, 2007
Posts: 3219
Search on this forum. There has been a number of similar questions.


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Scott A Jackson
Greenhorn

Joined: Jul 29, 2009
Posts: 4
Hi,
If you are looking forward to satisfactory jobs in Newzealand in IT you should visit http://www.cvb.co.nz. If you are interested for Auckland Jobs, Hamilton Jobs or Christchurch Jobs I think you'll be lucky to be on the portal.
There you'll find information about all sorts of NZ jobs in engineering, management, IT and Accounting that can really change your life.
All the best!
Warrick Wilson
Greenhorn

Joined: Apr 04, 2006
Posts: 10
Ade Adesanya wrote:I have not been lucky so far


Sorry if this sounds stupid, but what does luck have to do with it? Other than the CEO's grandson also needing a job at the exact same time, perhaps? Have you asked any of the places that you were turned down _why_ you got turned down?

I did some hiring at a small firm in Canada, and I've helped with hiring teammates in my current development position near Seattle. Here's why we turned down applicants:

Reject Resumes:
  • Spelling and grammar errors on the resume. If you didn't proof this REALLY important document, why will I expect you to take more care working for me?
  • Too much experience. If I ask for 2 years of practical experience after a Bachelor's degree, don't apply with a Ph.D and 20 years experience (it happens all the time). I won't be able to afford you.
  • Too little experience. If I ask for 3 years working with Coldfusion, I likely won't accept 6 months of ASP.NET experience.
  • You don't have any relevant experince. I know people need jobs; I need a programmer, and your resume is all about network setup and server maintenance. It happens. All the time.


  • Reject after First Interview:
  • You obviously can write a good resume, but you don't really know what you're talking about. Style over substance.
  • You know too much. Not in a good way - you know how to solve all our problems, without actually knowing what they are. Arrogance isn't a quality we want in our team, though the team's been known to be a little arrogant at times collectively.
  • You don't react well to a "gang interview". We usually have 2-5 people asking questions, observing you, and listening to your answers. Not everyone's a developer, but in a small company, we need some "generalists" who can do a lot of things pretty well, rather than deep experts who can do only one thing really well. If you can't handle a group situation cold, you'll be uncomfortable in our work environment.
  • Bad personal appearance/behavior. We're not talking looks here, but things like hygiene, dress, mannerisms, politeness. If you continually swear during the interview, that's probably points off (though we did have one poor candidate get exposed to our network manager's folu-mouthed diatribe as he ran down the hall during a network crash in the middle of an interview. But I digress...). You get one chance to make a first impression - make it a good one.
  • Outrageous salary/benefits expectations. You're not getting signing bonuses, probably no moving allowance (though you can ask), and developers tend not to make high 6-figures here. You can price yourself out of the market. You can low-ball yourself, too, which says to us that you didn't do your homework on what people are making in our area. That means you don't care, or don't know how to find that info. Both situations scare us.


  • We usually end up with two or three candidates after the first interviews. We've sometimes ended up with our selection after the first round. We get the candidates back in, and we'll likely throw more technical things at them. We've had them involved in a debugging session on some problem code we're facing, or given them a scenario we've recently struggled with and ask them for ideas. Usually our choice gets made from a combination of technical knowledge, perceived fit with the team, and salary expectation.

    We've had people call and ask what they could have done differently. Generally, we're brutally honest. If it's something like a perceived fit issue, it gets phrased in a manner that our corporate attorney approves of. We've had that discussion with him. If you smell bad, we'll say it nicely ("you presented a less professional image than our other candidates").

    Anyway - it can't hurt to ask why you got passed over. If it's too much experience, you need a different resume that "dumbs down" your capabilities/experience. Then let them see you're a gem in the interview.
    arulk pillai
    Author
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: May 31, 2007
    Posts: 3219
    Firstly, before you start piling up your certifications

    -- Improve your job hunting and networking skills. There are good books like "What color is your parachute?", etc.
    -- Write a resume, clearly mentioning your intention of changing careers. Indicate that you will be looking for an entry level position.
    -- Gain some hands-on experience in Java and some of the sought-after technologies. Even if you have to offer your services for free.
    -- Don't under estimate the power of volunteer work. It will not only give you the much needed hands-on experience, but also can open doors for paid jobs by either impressing your superiors or through the fellow professionals. This could be a win/win situation for both employer and employee.
    -- Work on some self-taught Java projects to gain some hands-on experience.
    -- Finally, time is tough. Be positive and work at it.

    Andy Lester
    Author
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Jun 03, 2009
    Posts: 61
    Ade Adesanya wrote:Can anybody give me advice on how to get a job as a Java Programmer or Web Component Developer?


    Think like the hiring manager, and do your research.

    The company needs someone to fill a job, but why? What do they need to have done? What problems do they face? How would hiring you, specifically, help the company, the department and the manager? Why should you get hired instead of someone else? What unique skills and experiences do you bring to the table?

    You have to be able to explain these things in an interview, even if not asked specifically. Otherwise, someone who can will get the job instead.


    The Working Geek, a blog of job hunting and work life for techies. Author of Land The Tech Job You Love. Follow me at @theworkinggeek
    rohit kshirsagar
    Greenhorn

    Joined: Apr 01, 2009
    Posts: 2
    arulk pillai wrote:Firstly, before you start piling up your certifications

    -- Improve your job hunting and networking skills. There are good books like "What color is your parachute?", etc.
    -- Write a resume, clearly mentioning your intention of changing careers. Indicate that you will be looking for an entry level position.
    -- Gain some hands-on experience in Java and some of the sought-after technologies. Even if you have to offer your services for free.
    -- Don't under estimate the power of volunteer work. It will not only give you the much needed hands-on experience, but also can open doors for paid jobs by either impressing your superiors or through the fellow professionals. This could be a win/win situation for both employer and employee.
    -- Work on some self-taught Java projects to gain some hands-on experience.
    -- Finally, time is tough. Be positive and work at it.



    thanks for that "before you start piling up your certifications" message
    job hunting skills and NETWORKING sure are important!

    Rohit
     
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