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Bluetooth simulate issue

 
Thai C. Tran
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hi,

I am doing a research for my university and connecting pc to phone using bluetooth is a small part of it. Unfortunately, my laptop doesn't have any bluetooth stuff, therefore i have to use a Bluecove (http://bluecove.org/bluecove-emu/) to simulate the bluetooth stack. When i use the command



on Xp, there is no problem but when using it on ubuntu 9.04, it ends with this error




Can you give me any advice, please?


 
Jesper de Jong
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This is most likely because on Ubuntu, you have to use : (colon) instead of ; (semi-colon) to separate path entries. Try this on Ubuntu:

 
Thai C. Tran
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wow, why do they have to make it more complicated like that . Thank you very much
 
Tim Holloway
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You can pick up a Bluetooth USB "thumb" device pretty cheap. I use one to pass data to and from my cellphone. Linux has some good Bluetooth utilities, and modern distros often automatically activate some of them if they detect an eligible device.

As to the colon/semicolon controversy, the semicolon is used to terminate commands in the shell, allowing you to stack more than one command on an input line. So they use the colon as a separator. Colons, tabs or vertical bars are probably the most popular field separator characters used in Unix/Linux data files as well.

Windows, on the other hand, puts colons in file pathnames (C:\Program Files). So they had to use the semicolon as a separator. Worse, still, they use the backslash in pathnames, which is the escape character in Unix and friends.
 
Andrew Monkhouse
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Thai Tran Cao wrote:wow, why do they have to make it more complicated like that

Every operating system has it's own little quirks, and unfortunately that state is likely to continue for the foreseeable future.

One could ask why Microsoft did not follow the pre-existing Unix conventions, but the question is kind of pointless: Microsoft were aiming at a different market and tried to make things simpler for their target audience.
 
Thai C. Tran
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well, i think i should buy a real bluetooth to test my app after finishing the code in the emulator. Thank all for your quick replies, this is really a very nice community


 
Tim Holloway
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Andrew Monkhouse wrote:
Thai Tran Cao wrote:wow, why do they have to make it more complicated like that

Every operating system has it's own little quirks, and unfortunately that state is likely to continue for the foreseeable future.

One could ask why Microsoft did not follow the pre-existing Unix conventions, but the question is kind of pointless: Microsoft were aiming at a different market and tried to make things simpler for their target audience.


Actually, Windows came from MS-DOS, which came from CP/M, which got a lot of its role models from the old DEC systems. Back then, OS's were a lot more idiosyncratic, and the Unix influences didn't even begin to show up until about the time that people started porting GNU utilities to CP/M. I was a CP/M user, so I watched it happen.

DEC systems are where the "DEVICENAME:" paradigm comes from ("LPT:", "A:") and also use of "/" as a switch indicator (as opposed to the Unix "-"). I'm not so sure about backslash, since I never worked with DEC directly. Backslash is a fairly recent character that came in because it was on Teletype[TM] keyboards, and they were popular as minicomputer consoles before people started wiring them into the pre-IBM PCs. You can see how recent in that unlike the "real" slash it doesn't have alternative names such as virgule or stroke. The only alternative name I know for backslash is one I wouldn't repeat in public.

It could have been worse. In college I worked with PR1ME computers. We could have ended up with filenames like "<SYSRES>HOME>TIMH>PRO_FT".

And if you thought 8.3 was bad, Primos had "6.0" filename components!
 
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