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Getting Started with server side java

Fred Hamilton
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 13, 2009
Posts: 679
Greetings. Not sure if I have the right forum. Feel free to move this to a more appropriate forum if you want.

I have programmed in java client side for a few years now, I'd like to start into server side (J2EE? Java EE?) but I could use a little guidance. Pardon if my terminology is incorrect

I am going on the assumption that it is a free download also. I'd like to install it on my Linux server (Debian Lenny). It's just a hobby server, If things get broken, I'll re-install no big deal. I already have apache/php/mySQL up and running.

At this point I'm really not sure what package I should be dealing with. On the download page... http://java.sun.com/javaee/downloads/index.jsp?userOsIndex=6&userOsId=windows&userOsName=Windows I see 5 packages. I'm assuming I don't need 1 because I have mySQL already. I suppose the choice is between 2 & 3, IS the JDK only if I will actually be sitting at the server doing my coding and compiling?

I looked at the tutorials and a couple of faqs, they don't really deal with deciding on packages.
Dan Kempten
Greenhorn

Joined: Dec 26, 2008
Posts: 25
I began with the 2nd one, Glassfish EE. It has the Derby database aboard and that's enough to start with.
If you don't have JDK already installed in your system then the 3rd one is what you need.

At least Java 5.

I've been through a bit with J2EE EJBs, in my entry an hour ago I wrote about using Netbeans as an IDE and
making session and entity beans work. That might help.

And get a good book and learn the words, persistence, mapped, clean, deploy, and such.

Good luck.
Fred Hamilton
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 13, 2009
Posts: 679
Dan Kempten wrote:I began with the 2nd one, Glassfish EE. It has the Derby database aboard and that's enough to start with.
If you don't have JDK already installed in your system then the 3rd one is what you need.

At least Java 5.

I've been through a bit with J2EE EJBs, in my entry an hour ago I wrote about using Netbeans as an IDE and
making session and entity beans work. That might help.

And get a good book and learn the words, persistence, mapped, clean, deploy, and such.

Good luck.


Thanks. From the bolded remark then I assume that there is just JDK, there is not a separate JDK for client side and server side. I already have jdk1.6.0_14 and JRE 6 on my workstation.

I'll have a look at your other post. This all looks a little more complex than clien side java, at least in terms of the range of technologies, so I'll be sure to take my time. Do a little more research before I attempt the download and install.
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
Marshal

Joined: Jan 10, 2002
Posts: 60996
    
  65

Why not just grab Tomcat and focus on Servlets and JSP until you have a working knowledge of those?

You can skip all the EJB stuff until (if ever) you need it.


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Fred Hamilton
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 13, 2009
Posts: 679
Bear Bibeault wrote:Why not just grab Tomcat and focus on Servlets and JSP until you have a working knowledge of those?

You can skip all the EJB stuff until (if ever) you need it.


Why not indeed. Starting small is a good thing.

I did a quick bit of research and it sounds like the Tomcat package exists on it's own as an implementation of Servlets and JSP, so I can grab the package from Apache.org or some Linux mirror, and not bother with the GlassFish EE download. I would also imagine that Tomcat can co-exist with Apache Web Server on the same Linux box, but I'll dig a little deeper before I decide.

Thanks, that provides me with a little direction which was exactly what I wanted.
Dan Kempten
Greenhorn

Joined: Dec 26, 2008
Posts: 25
Bear Bibeault wrote:Why not just grab Tomcat and focus on Servlets and JSP until you have a working knowledge of those?

You can skip all the EJB stuff until (if ever) you need it.


I agree with that.

Doing J2EE you sometimes have a component in JSP and it is worth your while to understand that well before attacking the Land of Beans (EJB).
 
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