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Hot chiles

Ernest Friedman-Hill
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  34

Got these from our CSA program. Suggestions for using them are invited.



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Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
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Joined: Jan 10, 2002
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  65

How many you got?

P.S. Nice looking chiles.


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Ernest Friedman-Hill
author and iconoclast
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  34

You're looking at all of them -- just a small "grab bag."

It has already occurred to be that one answer to my question is "art". I therefore just took a boatload of photos of them for future reference.
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
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  65

Hmm, if you had half a pound I would've sent you my Hot Chile Jam recipe. Let me know if you want it anyways. I guess you could always augment the haul with store-bought chiles.

I assume the old stand-by of salsa already occurred to you.

If you're really adventurous, you could candy them.

Bear Bibeault
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  65

Ernest Friedman-Hill wrote:It has already occurred to be that one answer to my question is "art".

Chiles are quite photogenic. Especially when you apply creative lighting.
Bear Bibeault
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  65

P.S. For my yearly tradition of making my Hot Chile Jam at Christmas-time, I have 18 plants on my back patio. Over the past few months it's just been too danged hot for them to set fruit. (Now, you know you're in trouble when it's too hot for chile plants!)

Hopefully now that the torrid pattern is breaking, they'll start bearing, and I'll have a big crop for the Jam.

I already have a big crop of loquats (which fruit in late winter) in my freezer waiting to be made into jelly.
Maneesh Godbole
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Joined: Jul 26, 2007
Posts: 10167
    
    8

Note: Taste might vary depending on the genre of ingredients

Remove the stalk.
Make an incision down the length.
Remove the seeds.
Pour yourself a dram of your favorite whiskey.
Drop the said prepared chili in the glass and let it get acquainted with the whiskey for 5 minutes.
Savor by sipping.

Works especially good on cold days (preferably freezing), a comfy rocking chair, mood lighting and soft music. Replace music with book if you feel like it.


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Chris Creed
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Joined: Feb 27, 2009
Posts: 67

I echo the chili idea. Makes my mouth water just thinking about it.
Paul Sturrock
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Joined: Apr 14, 2004
Posts: 10336

Maneesh Godbole wrote:Note: Taste might vary depending on the genre of ingredients

Remove the stalk.
Make an incision down the length.
Remove the seeds.
Pour yourself a dram of your favorite whiskey.
Drop the said prepared chili in the glass and let it get acquainted with the whiskey for 5 minutes.
Savor by sipping.

Works especially good on cold days (preferably freezing), a comfy rocking chair, mood lighting and soft music. Replace music with book if you feel like it.


Dear god! Chillis are going no where near my favourite whiskey!


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Maneesh Godbole
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Joined: Jul 26, 2007
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    8

I absolutely hate it when people name stuff which one cannot even pronounce properly.....before drinking! Why cannot everything be as simple as Bushmills.
Paul Sturrock
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Joined: Apr 14, 2004
Posts: 10336

Oo-gay-dal is how you say it Maneesh.

And you are still not getting to put chillis in it...
Maneesh Godbole
Saloon Keeper

Joined: Jul 26, 2007
Posts: 10167
    
    8

What about the first part? Is it said as Ard-beg? What does it mean in simple English?

Paul Sturrock
Bartender

Joined: Apr 14, 2004
Posts: 10336

Yes, Ard-beg. I don't know what it means I'm afraid, I'm not a Gaelic speaker. Lovely whisky though.
Chris Baron
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Joined: Mar 21, 2003
Posts: 1049
Yumm Islay.
I don't drink a lot of whiskey but the best ones are from Islay for my taste.
Ernest Friedman-Hill
author and iconoclast
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Joined: Jul 08, 2003
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  34

I got two more bags today and I think I'd call it a scant half pound now. I think hot pepper jelly it is -- recipe please!
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
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Joined: Jan 10, 2002
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  65

You got it!

BEAR'S HOT RED PEPPER JAM

1 lb. red bell pepper flesh, seeded *
1/2 lb. fresno (or any hot red) chile flesh, seeded *
6 c sugar
1 1/2 c cider vinegar
1 T red pepper flakes
6 oz (2 pouches) liquid pectin

1. Pulse pepper and chile flesh in food processor until fine. (Add some of the vinegar if it's too dry.)

2. Place pepper mash, sugar, vinegar and flakes into a stock pot and bring to a boil.

3. Once sugar is dissolved, add pectin. Stir well.

4. Boil until jelling stage (220F) is reached. You can use the frozen plate test with good results.

5. Fill sterilized canning jars with hot jam.

6. Process jars 5 minutes in boiling hot water bath.


* You can adjust the ratio of bell pepper to hot chile flesh. Just as long as you end up with 1 1/2 pounds of flesh.
Vikas Kapoor
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Joined: Aug 16, 2007
Posts: 1374
I fry chilies in oil and eat them with Khichdi. Tastes Great!
Anil K Chandra
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Joined: Dec 12, 2008
Posts: 44
I'd make some bajjis out of them.
Mike Simmons
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Joined: Mar 05, 2008
Posts: 2982
    
    9
One thing to be aware of, EFH, if you haven't had one before: watch out for that orange guy. That's a habanero, which is the Happy Fun Ball of the US commercial chili market. A little bit will go a long way. And be careful to wash your hands after handling it - if you touch your eyes afterwards before washing, you will be sorry. I'm not sure what the others are - the bent red one may be a cayenne, which is also fairly potent. I'd sample a very small bit of each, to get an idea what you're dealing with.
Chris Baron
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Joined: Mar 21, 2003
Posts: 1049
Chiles rellenos de queso was the best dish i had when i was in Mexico. I think it was in Puerto Vallerta or Manzanillo. The version with cream cheese seems to be a regional speciality because they didn't have it in the other places i travelled southwards.
Sameer Jamal
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Joined: Feb 16, 2001
Posts: 1870
Recently I had Bhoot(Ghost) Jalokia (Chili), the hottest chili in the world, its found in the Nagaland hills in North East India,


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Chris Baron
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You obviously survived But how was the experience, Sameer?
Steve Fahlbusch
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Joined: Sep 18, 2000
Posts: 557
    
    7

It that's all you have, then you may want to grill some shrimp ---

clean shrimp - place on bamboo skewers and into a marinade of:

orange juice, the peppers (sliced), ginger (sliced), parsley, lime juice - and let them soak for a few - up to 8 or so hours.

place on hot grill and drizzle some of the marinade while grilling - let it carmalize a bit.

nice flavor - not too hot just a hint with the shrimp
Ernest Friedman-Hill
author and iconoclast
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Joined: Jul 08, 2003
Posts: 24183
    
  34

Bear Bibeault wrote: BEAR'S HOT RED PEPPER JAM
OK, got all the stuff; cooking tomorrow. Don't worry about me, Mike, I'm a big boy -- I've spent a whole lot of time in Albuquerque...
Ernest Friedman-Hill
author and iconoclast
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  34

It went extremely well! I've never done home canning before but both my jars sealed correctly and nothing exploded. The jam jelled, even though I used dry pectin instead of liquid (couldn't find it.) Mike psyched me out a little, and I was worried the jam would be too hot if I used the three Habaneros I had, so I just used half of one. But it came out barely hot at all, and I definitely could have used more Habaneros with no ill effects.

And best of all, this stuff is awesome! We made fried fish soft tacos for dinner, and we tried the jam on those. It was unbelievable. Of course, it's great on wheat crackers as well. But my wife, who normally isn't a fan of spicy food, absolutely loves the stuff. So thanks, Bear!

It's beautiful as well:



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Monu Tripathi
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Joined: Oct 12, 2008
Posts: 1369
    
    1

I think I will have bread and jam in breakfast today! Can you please let me have some of that?


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Mike Simmons
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Joined: Mar 05, 2008
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    9
Hmm, I smell a stealth edit from yesterday... ;)

Ernest Friedman-Hill wrote:It went extremely well! I've never done home canning before but both my jars sealed correctly and nothing exploded.

Always a good sign.

Ernest Friedman-Hill wrote:Mike psyched me out a little, and I was worried the jam would be too hot if I used the three Habaneros I had, so I just used half of one. But it came out barely hot at all, and I definitely could have used more Habaneros with no ill effects.

Well, those are wimpy New England Chilies, obviously. ;)

Hmm, I see Bear's recipe also recommends seeding the peppers. Meh. The seeds are where the real kick comes from. On the other hand, the flesh gives fire combined with better flavor. So yeah, if you're seeding them, you can use more flesh, makes sense.

The warning about washing your hands after touching the raw chilies, especially the seeds, still applies though.

Ernest Friedman-Hill wrote:And best of all, this stuff is awesome!

Excellent news. I may have to visit the local farmers' market this Saturday to find the freshest chilies I can, and follow in your footsteps. Thanks, Bear & EFH!
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
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  65

Ernest Friedman-Hill wrote:It went extremely well!

Too cool, Ernest! It looks gorgeous. Depending upon the chiles used, it can come out a variety of shades of red, but always beautiful.

All of mine is gone -- guess it's time for another batch.

I still do have a jar to two of my Green Chile Jelly (different recipe, available on request).

I've never done home canning before but both my jars sealed correctly and nothing exploded.

A lot of people are intimidated by home canning. but acidic foods like jams and jellies that can be canned using a hot water bath are really not a big deal.

Pressure canning (for low acid stuff) is a different story...

The jam jelled, even though I used dry pectin instead of liquid (couldn't find it.)

Either will work. I like the liquid stuff 'cause it's just a bit easier to deal with than the powder (which I always manage to spill).

Mike psyched me out a little, and I was worried the jam would be too hot if I used the three Habaneros I had

The sugar has a bit of a calming effect on the heat. Now that you have a baseline, you can adjust your next batch accordingly.

And best of all, this stuff is awesome! We made fried fish soft tacos for dinner, and we tried the jam on those. It was unbelievable. Of course, it's great on wheat crackers as well. But my wife, who normally isn't a fan of spicy food, absolutely loves the stuff.

That's awesome! I'm glad your all grooving on it!

I never would have thought of the fish tacos -- now I'm hankering to try it out!

So thanks, Bear!

Most welcome.
Bear Bibeault
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  65

Mike Simmons wrote:Hmm, I see Bear's recipe also recommends seeding the peppers. Meh. The seeds are where the real kick comes from.

I recommend seeding the chiles not to tame the heat, but because when they up in the jam, I find them hard and bitter and distracting.

(Chile trivia -- the heat doesn't really come from the seeds, but from the inner membrane and ribs of the chiles. The seeds are just hot by association.)

The warning about washing your hands after touching the raw chilies, especially the seeds, still applies though.

Oh yes! I have stories...

Thanks, Bear & EFH!

Happy to contribute to everyone's capsaicin consumption!
Bear Bibeault
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  65

OK, now I'm inspired.

I've been mulling over a new recipe I want to develop with some flavors that I think will go well together.

So this weekend I'm going to make a first pass at a recipe for Pineapple-Mango-Habanero Jam.
Mike Simmons
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    9
Bear Bibeault wrote:I recommend seeding the chiles not to tame the heat, but because when they up in the jam, I find them hard and bitter and distracting.

Good reason. It's easy enough to add heat to anything just by throwing in more chilies / tabasco / pepper flakes / sriracha sauce / cayenne powder / whatever. It's harder to tailor flavor and texture to a specific dish. So I respect the rationale.

Bear Bibeault wrote:(Chile trivia -- the heat doesn't really come from the seeds, but from the inner membrane and ribs of the chiles. The seeds are just hot by association.)

True, but they seem to absorb quite a lot of heat from this association. Moreso than the rest of the surrounding flesh, it seems. Removing seeds does usually have a significant impact on heat, in my experience. Note that in many dishes, after cooking, the heat has spread throughout the dish (that's the goal, yes), and so it isn't necessarily concentrated in the seeds afterwards. I don't know if this sort of logic applies at all the the jam recipe.
Bear Bibeault
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  65

Mike Simmons wrote:True, but they seem to absorb quite a lot of heat from this association.

They're pourous and absorb a lot of the secreted capsaicin. That's why a lot of people think that they are the source of the heat. So yes, leaving them in does impart more "heat" in the way of the capsaicin they've absorbed.

When I make a chile jelly -- where the solids are strained out -- the seeds are definitely left in the mash.

Mike Simmons
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    9
Bear wrote:They're pourous and absorb a lot of the secreted capsaicin. That's why a lot of people think that they are the source of the heat

And to the extent that most of us are dealing with chilis mostly or exclusively in their fully developed form, that's good enough, IMO. The seeds are a major source of heat at that point - even if the heat really originated elsewhere.

But yeah, other than some linguistic quibbling, I think we're pretty much on the same page here. (Except I am much lazier as a chef.) If I ever find myself in Austin, I'll be looking you up to see if you have any jam or jelly on hand.
Bear Bibeault
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  65

Mike Simmons wrote:But yeah, other than some linguistic quibbling, I think we're pretty much on the same page here.

Absolutely -- that's why I prefaced my statement with "chile trivia". Just an off-hand comment.

In most recipes, where the texture isn't as important as in the jam, the seeds stay in.

If I ever find myself in Austin, I'll be looking you up to see if you have any jam or jelly on hand.

I always have jams and jellies on hand. They make great gifts, and I never show up at a dinner party without a jar as a house-gift.

In my pantry right now (I just checked), I have jars of: Spiced Cherry Jam, Spiced Blueberry Jam, Tropical Rum Preserves, Green Chile Jelly, and Loquat* Jam.

* From the Loquat trees in my backyard.
Ernest Friedman-Hill
author and iconoclast
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Joined: Jul 08, 2003
Posts: 24183
    
  34

Bear Bibeault wrote:
* From the Loquat trees in my backyard.


Thanks, Wikipedia! I had no idea what these were. Sounds interesting, especially the part about the subtle but noticeable sedative effects. Good for midnight snacks?
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
Marshal

Joined: Jan 10, 2002
Posts: 60740
    
  65

Ernest Friedman-Hill wrote:Thanks, Wikipedia! I had no idea what these were. Sounds interesting, especially the part about the subtle but noticeable sedative effects. Good for midnight snacks?

LOL. I guess I've never eaten them in enough quantity to notice any sedative effect. But they are extremely yummy!
 
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