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Ed Carrington
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Joined: Oct 11, 2007
Posts: 77
I have been working with J2EE for a several years and now I want to starting working with Web Services using Java. It seems every Web Services with Java training course I have taken uses Net Beans. I heard Eclipse also has a user friendly IDE for working with Web services.
Please advise which one is the best for working with Web Services or they both the same?
Ivan Krizsan
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 04, 2006
Posts: 2198
    
    1
Hi!
My personal experiences are as follows concerning Eclipse vs NetBeans:

Eclipse: More low-level than NetBeans, but also lets you see all the details.
I usually write Ant scripts to do things like wsimport and wsgen (working with GlassFish and Metro), but this may be because I haven't found the proper tools. However, this is not an issue to me - I prefer knowing exactly what is going on. Good tooling for Axis (as far as I am able to determine - no extensive experience in this area).
Has TCP monitor and web service testing tool for SOAP web services.

NetBeans: More high-level than Eclipse with wizards for creating web services, hiding generated artifacts. Drag-and-drop creation of web service client invocation. A very nice collection of tutorials at netbeans.org.
One invaluable tool is the WS-Policy file editor - this only is a reason to keep a NetBeans installation. Writing WS-Policy files by hand is not for the faint of heart (at least not something I enjoy).
Has TCP monitor, but I haven't found a web service testing tool. GlassFish has one, though, so I haven't searched extensively.

Conclusion: NetBeans tool support for web services seems better, but Eclipse gives you more control, so in the end I guess it is a matter of personal taste.
Best wishes!
Ed Carrington
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 11, 2007
Posts: 77
Ivan Krizsan wrote:Hi!
My personal experiences are as follows concerning Eclipse vs NetBeans:

Eclipse: More low-level than NetBeans, but also lets you see all the details.
I usually write Ant scripts to do things like wsimport and wsgen (working with GlassFish and Metro), but this may be because I haven't found the proper tools. However, this is not an issue to me - I prefer knowing exactly what is going on. Good tooling for Axis (as far as I am able to determine - no extensive experience in this area).
Has TCP monitor and web service testing tool for SOAP web services.

NetBeans: More high-level than Eclipse with wizards for creating web services, hiding generated artifacts. Drag-and-drop creation of web service client invocation. A very nice collection of tutorials at netbeans.org.
One invaluable tool is the WS-Policy file editor - this only is a reason to keep a NetBeans installation. Writing WS-Policy files by hand is not for the faint of heart (at least not something I enjoy).
Has TCP monitor, but I haven't found a web service testing tool. GlassFish has one, though, so I haven't searched extensively.

Conclusion: NetBeans tool support for web services seems better, but Eclipse gives you more control, so in the end I guess it is a matter of personal taste.
Best wishes!


Thanks, sounds likes NetBeans had more friendly Wizards and better for a beginner web services person like me.

David Newton
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Joined: Sep 29, 2008
Posts: 12617

Relying on generated code, wizards, etc. is a false savings--it puts you in a position of knowing less about what you're working on and can make diagnosing problems more difficult. Be wary.
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://aspose.com/file-tools
 
subject: IDE