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LINUX GUI

 
Renjan Thomas
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I have a windows machine and and connecting to a linux box using putty.

I dont have a GUI(x windows) installed in my machine. But i need to execute a script which will launch a configuration wizard....

Is there anyway i could do this without installing the GUI.??

 
Joe Ess
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Renjan thomas wrote:
Is there anyway i could do this without installing the GUI.??

Usually software created for the *nix environment has a command-line equivalent. For example, K3b, the popular GUI CD/DVD burner is "just" a front end to the command-line cdrecord and dvd+rw-tools programs. Contact your vendor.
If you are stuck with a GUI wizard there are a few options. First, if the Linux box is headless, Xvfb is a virtual X11 server that does not require a graphics system. I use Xvfb on my headless Solaris servers so I can run OpenOffice for document conversion. Second, on the Windows side, you can run X on Cygwin so you can display an X windows program running on your Linux server on your Windows machine (X tunneling).
 
Renjan Thomas
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Usually software created for the *nix environment has a command-line equivalent*


Yes Joe...actually i want to create a Oracle BPM engine....but i couldnt find a commandline equivalent for that.....OBPM installation has a command line equivalent but for directory service creation i couldnt find out.

Finally i am installing cygwin in my system.....
 
Tim Holloway
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Actually, you'll often find 3 levels:

1. Straight command-line

2. Text-mode GUI (a la MS-DOS)

3. Full GUI

This is often accomplished with minimal effort by wiring the commands into a GUI framework. Shell scripts can use curses and various text-mode support functions (such as the command-line dialog facility). GUI stuff can us the GUI equivalents, such as tcl/Wish.

Of course, if you're stuck trying to run a vendor-supplied GUI app where they weren't flexible, that's small consolation.
 
With a little knowledge, a cast iron skillet is non-stick and lasts a lifetime.
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