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jsf_book_recomendation

James Howerton
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Joined: Mar 14, 2009
Posts: 82
The name of this question is jsf_book_recomendation
Hello and Thank you in advance for any assistance.


System info:

I use Netbeans,MySQL,glassfish

The Purpose of this post is:

To see if any one has a good recommendation for a book to study JSF web app building. Preferably something that get into accessing databases.
Thanks again.
-ceyesumma
Cameron Wallace McKenzie
author and cow tipper
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Joined: Aug 26, 2006
Posts: 4968

I think we still need a killer book for learning JSF. But the standard books, Core JSF and JSF:Complete Reference are fairly comprehensive.

The database stuff is really separate from the JSF stuff. I'd say focus on the JSF, and later, learn about the database stuff. Then, when you understand each individually, you will have no problem bringing the two together.

-Cameron McKenzie
Rainer Eschen
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Joined: Jan 24, 2009
Posts: 75
You may have a look at the framework you want to use, first. Then select a more specific book. This may reduce your learning efforts. A lot of details of the lower JSF layers isn't necessary to know to write successful applications with the high level components you get. You should have a look at JSF 2.0 in any case.


ICEfaces book . ICEcube . ICEfusion . Scrum
James Howerton
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Joined: Mar 14, 2009
Posts: 82
Hello and Thank you in advance for any assistance.

Yes, I agree a killer book for learning JSF would be nice. Everything changes so fast it might be outdated when it gets published. Now I am wondering what icefaces is and how it fits into my JSF learning. It seems that searching for a JSF book is premature because JSF pages have functionality that is covered nicely in the JSF CORE tutorials. As far as I can see it really is not that different from the JSP pages once the XML structure is understood .

I also agree that the standard books, Core JSF and JSF: Complete Reference are fairly comprehensive. Yet, the examples I was working with were a part of a tremendous EJB project and for me it was hard to re create smaller apps.


new question:

I see your points of view. Maybe I should be looking for the latest JSP book that has some good (working) examples that will build my understanding of the use of technologies such as: JSTL, JMS, JTA, JDBC, JPA ETC. A book that has good examples of using things such as: @annotations, Entities, controllers, models, and resources. All that good stuff!
What book am I looking for?

Thanks again.
-ceyesumma

Note:
………………………………………………………………………………………………
Nick Potter
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Joined: May 07, 2008
Posts: 126
JSF in Action is also a pretty good book, unfortunately it has a lot of details that, in my opinion, are of no interest for the common developer. It's pretty big and outdated, too. I'm looking for some kind of developer's workbook in order to start developing JSF fast.
Rainer Eschen
author
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Joined: Jan 24, 2009
Posts: 75
James Howerton wrote:

new question:

I see your points of view. Maybe I should be looking for the latest JSP book that has some good (working) examples that will build my understanding of the use of technologies such as: JSTL, JMS, JTA, JDBC, JPA ETC. A book that has good examples of using things such as: @annotations, Entities, controllers, models, and resources. All that good stuff!
What book am I looking for?

Thanks again.
-ceyesumma

Note:
………………………………………………………………………………………………


Wow. The complete J(2)EE stack. Makes no sense to ask for one book. It is easier to start with a certain layer. If your focus is on presentation, start with JSF. I still think it is easier to start with the high-level framework (RichFaces, ICEfaces) and go into JSF core details if necessary. Forget about JSP. With JSF 2.0 JSP is dead.

If you understand the presentation layer continue with the business layer (with a focus on persistency in the end). You should have a look at Spring/Hibernate or something similar in the ORM field that is based on JPA. Don't start with JPA here, it's another core technology that you don't have to understand in the first step. Using Spring+Hibernate is pretty simple to use. If you follow the EJB 3 path instead have a look at Seam.

This will be a lot of books and tutorials, but you asked for the complete JEE stack ;-).
James Howerton
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Joined: Mar 14, 2009
Posts: 82
Thanks much for the input.

I have extensive notes on most of the technologies mentioned. I guess I will have to organize them all and tear back into the ejb l Java ee tutorial

I think I can re visit some simple jsf apps I was working with (that don't work) and try to work on:

  • ■ Registering back-end objects with the application so that all parts of the application have access to them ■ Configuring backing beans and model beans so that they are instantiated with the proper values when a page makes reference to them ■ Defining navigation rules for each of the pages in the application so that the application has a smooth page flow ■ Packaging the application to include all the pages, objects, and other files so that the application can be deployed on any compliant container



  • question

    When I look at some of the apps I was working with might work if I could get to the first page. getting to the first page was a feat I have little understanding of: is this a sufficient technique?
    I just make a html link to the first JSF page.
    following the path

    Description:

    in the web.xml





    question:

    Do you think a good start would be to build the MVC2 structure and get validation and using JMS is a good start? or is that asking to much? I am interested in performing all the responsibilities of the application architect.

    note:

    I hope I can do this with out servlets and filters etc. that stuff is way confusing.
    Rainer Eschen
    author
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Jan 24, 2009
    Posts: 75
    I suggest that you study a JSF tutorial. A lot of what you are uncertain about at the moment will disappear immediately. Navigation between pages is done through actions that you define e.g. in a command button. The navigation is defined in the faces-config.xml, so that you can use viewIds in your backing bean or tags. You don't need to write servlets or filters yourself ;-). But, you could if necessary.
    Ionut Bucurescu
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    Joined: Dec 19, 2006
    Posts: 68
    Can we read the book without having any further jsf theoretical knowledge? After reading the book will be able to understand and design icefaces user interfaces of medium/high complexity?


    SCJP 1.4, SCBCD 5.0, SCDJWS 5.0, SCEA5
    Rainer Eschen
    author
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    Joined: Jan 24, 2009
    Posts: 75
    You will be able to design such user interfaces, but it will be easier to understand if a basic JSF knowledge is available. I think after studying a comprehensive JSF tutorial that shows how JSF applications are structured you can start with the ICEfaces book.
    James Howerton
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    Joined: Mar 14, 2009
    Posts: 82
    That sounds copacetic. Thank Rainer Eschen.

    I only looked at a few tags in icefaces but it looks like it might offer more control over components. Do you think there is a icefaces book that would introduce icefaces and also show examples of apps that do lke: login and database stuff. Something more than just using the icefaces tags anyway?
    Thanks
    ceyesumma
    Rainer Eschen
    author
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    Joined: Jan 24, 2009
    Posts: 75
    My book is the only one at the moment. But, it has a focus on ICEfaces components. Security and persistence is not really in its focus. For this you have to have a deeper look at e.g. Spring Security and Hibernate. The sample code is based on the AppFuse framework that delivers the necessary integration for those frameworks. If you study AppFuse you can add this to the sample code. But, to have a deeper understanding of this you have to explore how to add Security and Persistence to a JSF application. This should be another two introduction tutorials you can study aside my book ;-).

    Those Enterprise architectures are still complicate beasts. This can't be done all in a small book, sorry.
    Per Lindberg
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    Joined: Jan 17, 2008
    Posts: 48
    So it appears that Rainers book on IceFaces could have a companion that explains the basics of JSF and IceFaces, with some minimalistically simple "Hello World" examples that does not come with tons of other stuff such as Spring or Maven, etc. Judging from the discussions here in the Saloon, someone can make a bundle writing such a book (hint, hint). I would certainly buy it, if it was available today.
    Rainer Eschen
    author
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    Joined: Jan 24, 2009
    Posts: 75
    :-))

    Well, you still have the IDE plugins that help to create such simple projects. The chapter in my book talking about installing the Eclipse plugin has some extra discussions in context to the "simple Facelets project". I use this to show on which ideas the ICEcube sample application is based on.

    You may also have a look at the developer documentation you get from ICEsoft. There's a lot of stuff in that allows you to skip the "JSF details part". ICEfaces helps a lot in preventing those lower JSF layers.
    James Howerton
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    Joined: Mar 14, 2009
    Posts: 82
    Thanks for the info. Rainer Eschen;

    I have started trying to get some my JSF apps to work. Security isn't a problem yet. I can't even get to the first page so there pretty secure. lol. I will research your book when I get a handle on the basic though.
    -ceyesuma
    Per Lindberg
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    Joined: Jan 17, 2008
    Posts: 48
    Rainer: IDE support is unfortunately not the answer. For example, although IntelliJ IDEA has support for JSF, it does not help you download the right library files and put them in the correct places, nor explain what they are. And not code and explain a "Hello World" example, either.

    I have been looking for a rock-bottom plain vanilla standalone minimalistic intro to JSF and IceFaces, without preconceptions or bells & whistles, but found none. So there's definitely a market for an introductory book on the subject.

     
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