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Linux Certification

Vignesh Bhupathi
Greenhorn

Joined: Mar 04, 2009
Posts: 29
Hi All,

I would like to know if there are any System Level Programming (like Threads, Files,semaphores , mutex, popen, IO, Signals) certifications available for Linux. I heard about Red Hat/SUSE Linux Admin certification..

Whether I need to take Red Hat or SUSE Linux certifications.. I am a complete novice in the world of Unix/Linux.. Please provide details about this certification, since I am to new to this Linux, so please provide links or pointers to start...

Please give your valuable suggestions...

PS: I like to learn Linux ,I love to work in Open Source Projects..


Regards,
Vignesh SCJP 5 ,SCWCD 5 , SCDJWS 5 , SCBCD 5, SCEA PART-1
Tim Holloway
Saloon Keeper

Joined: Jun 25, 2001
Posts: 16145
    
  21

If you want a "certification" that actually carries some weight, it's to be a Linux kernel contributor. It's not a memorize-and-regurgitate piece of paper, though. It's an explicit admission by Linux Torvalds and friends that you not only really truly know what you're doing, you do it so well that you've managed to make a useful contribution to Linux itself.

Kind of like what the act of obtaining a PhD is supposed to be about. Making a noteworthy contribution to the art as defined by the masters of that art.


Customer surveys are for companies who didn't pay proper attention to begin with.
Vignesh Bhupathi
Greenhorn

Joined: Mar 04, 2009
Posts: 29
Thanks Tim Holloway.

"memorize-and-regurgitate" - Absolutely you are correct. Its just memorize the methods and clearing the exam and update my resume with this certification(for applying to new job) -- A big no for this.. I would like to take this exam to learn Linux and its my interest too. I would likely to miss some concepts,if I start to read without any proper flow and guidance..Certification helps me to understand the concepts and its advantages/disadvantages.

Linux kernel contributor - Yes off course , I would love to do . 2 years back,I was very keen to do some development or patch work for Linux.So I have started to read basic system programming(as well executed the programs) & shell programming and parallely I read almost half of the book -MINIX( Operating System with Source Code). Once my designation changed from student to employee ,as my career burgeoned and my interest have been diverted and started learning java.

I didn't find time to cherish my Linux skills. - This statement is ridiculous . I must say ,I couldn't able to balance my work as well as inefficient time management ..

Now, I like to do something different with relish , innovative and for free cost . I love to work in a open source project..


Need proper guidance for this questions
- Where to start (As you have already mentioned - explicit admission by Linux Torvalds )
- I need a chance to prove myself that I am fit for this work -How to do that .
- Skills which I need to acquire

and I am assure you that I would contribute to Linux.I would like to have suggestions from expertise.
Tim Holloway
Saloon Keeper

Joined: Jun 25, 2001
Posts: 16145
    
  21

Where to start? Find something about Linux you don't like that you think you can improve.

What to do? Try and fix it. The Linux developers have little groups devoted to their areas of expertise, so find the one that goes with what you want to do and join it. Ask questions, make suggestions.

Skills you need? Depends on what you want to work on. If there's something you'd like to do to iptables, you need to become a network expert. If virtual memory is of interest, learn how paging systems work (the latest kernel is adding features where VMs can share common read-only copies of RAM instead of duplicating them). Linux could still benefit from simpler multimedia facilities. I've seen many improvement over the years (and even alpha and beta tested some), but it's no walk in the park, even yet.

This advice is basically the same as for any open-source project, but after all, Linux is an open-source project. The main difference is that since it's the OS itself, you would have a lot more people affected, and you're usually going to have to be a lot more careful. General applications can afford to go haywire and die. A good OS should not, and even if the OS doesn't "oops", you don't want to corrupt things internally to the point where it takes a reboot to fix it. Otherwise you might as well just submit your CV to Microsoft.

Speaking of rebooting, one of the most exciting changes to Linux lately is its ability to "hot-upgrade" the kernel itself. It's always been true that even trivial upgrades to Windows required reboots, but only low-level kernel changes required Linux reboots. That's mostly due to DLL locking, and even a lot of recent work by Microsoft hasn't been able to totally fix that (it's basically a fundamental architectural limitation). Recent Linux kernel versions have made even low-level changes possible while still running.

It's not true that all Linux does is play "catch-up" with commercial software. Linux is now mature enough to occasionally pioneer things itself.
Vignesh Bhupathi
Greenhorn

Joined: Mar 04, 2009
Posts: 29
Thanks Tim for your valuable suggestions.I would be grateful & thankful to you and appropriating for answering my questions.

"Find something about Linux you don't like" - I love this statement . I will try to analyze and have to think out of the box for new features.

Tim Holloway
Saloon Keeper

Joined: Jun 25, 2001
Posts: 16145
    
  21

If you prefer, you can also find something about Linux that wonderful, but could be made wonderfuller. I do get accused of having a negative attitude sometimes.
Paul Kinane
Greenhorn

Joined: Sep 29, 2009
Posts: 5
DOS is a command line OS, single user, much less powerful than Linux or Unix. Many commands for DOS were also present in (and copied from?) CP/M. Many Linux/Unix commands are different from those of DOS.
Joe Harry
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 26, 2006
Posts: 9427
    
    2

Just to not deviate from the original post, which Linux certification would make more sense? I'm trying to consider the Linux+. Anyone already having it?


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Did a rm -R / to find out that I lost my entire Linux installation!
 
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subject: Linux Certification