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JBoss inner workings and JMX to microcontainer shift

jim cato
Greenhorn

Joined: Jul 15, 2008
Posts: 21
Hi Fransesco,

How do you think the move in JBoss 5 from JMX managed beans to microcontainer POJOs, will encourage application development? Is the thinking that application developers will build applications as services to be deployed under JBoss5? Or are microcontainer POJOs just a better architecture for the JBoss core? Either way, why do you think it was necessary to develop a custom IOC framework rather than just use an existing one?

About the book specifically, how deep into the JBoss 5 workings do you delve in the book?

Cheers,
Jim
jim cato
Greenhorn

Joined: Jul 15, 2008
Posts: 21
Apologies Francesco, I misspelt your name.
Francesco Marchioni
author
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 22, 2003
Posts: 190
jim cato wrote:Hi Fransesco,

How do you think the move in JBoss 5 from JMX managed beans to microcontainer POJOs, will encourage application development? Is the thinking that application developers will build applications as services to be deployed under JBoss5? Or are microcontainer POJOs just a better architecture for the JBoss core? Either way, why do you think it was necessary to develop a custom IOC framework rather than just use an existing one?

About the book specifically, how deep into the JBoss 5 workings do you delve in the book?

Cheers,
Jim

Hi Jim,
thanks for your inquiry. Well the earlier JMX container was an excellent modular solution which was one of the reason of the application server's success. Even if it was an excellent kernel, it was still tying the user to the application server interfaces. Also another problem was that JMX might not be available in all environments.
With a POJO kernel you have simple Java classes. This removes any lock-in to the application server thus allowing even testing services outside of the application server.
Related to your last question: the book covers concrete programming examples with the application server: in many points it is intentionally showed a solution/advice introduced with the 5.X release so that the reader takes advantage to learn new stuff.
hope it helps
kind regards
Francesco


WildFly 8 Administration Book - JBoss Tutorials
jim cato
Greenhorn

Joined: Jul 15, 2008
Posts: 21
Hi Francesco,
Thanks for the reply.

It seems logical that an IOC framework would be more flexible than the JMX based kernel for the future development of the server itself.

But how does this benefit developers; how can application developers make use of the JBoss IOC model to develop better applications?
And why would they do this instead of just writing standard applications with other IOC frameworks, i.e. what benefit does developing a JBoss service bring?

I am thinking your book will answer this question?


Thanks,
Jim
Ales Justin
Greenhorn

Joined: Oct 05, 2004
Posts: 4
jim cato wrote:
But how does this benefit developers; how can application developers make use of the JBoss IOC model to develop better applications?
And why would they do this instead of just writing standard applications with other IOC frameworks, i.e. what benefit does developing a JBoss service bring?

This is one of the main reasons we decided to do our own IoC:
* http://soa.dzone.com/articles/a-look-inside-jboss-microconta

Atm we're working on (transparently) adding OSGi services to the mix as well:
* http://jaxlondon.com/conferences/trackssessions/?tid=1453#session-13375
* http://anonsvn.jboss.org/repos/jbossas/projects/jboss-osgi/projects/runtime/framework/trunk/src/test/java/org/jboss/test/osgi/service/ServiceMixUnitTestCase.java
jim cato
Greenhorn

Joined: Jul 15, 2008
Posts: 21
Hi Ales,
Thanks for the links, it is very interesting. I am still a little confused; I think because I don't understand enough about the new features to see how they can be usefully applied.

But it seems as though the microcontainer brings JBoss closer to a Spring-like IoC container, whilst still maintaining the JEE application server umbrella. Therefore, I would write an application or a suite of applications that, whilst independent, can be connected together more easily than in a standard JEE AS, using the micro container features. Is that right, what do you think?

In this case, would I not be writing applications that are locked in to JBoss?

Thanks,
Jim
Ales Justin
Greenhorn

Joined: Oct 05, 2004
Posts: 4
jim cato wrote:
In this case, would I not be writing applications that are locked in to JBoss?

No.
You still just code against POJOs -- the default component model in MC.
Others are MBeans or OSGi services (which are again just POJOs).
So, as you can see, no JBoss lock-in what-so-ever.

And with the component model abstraction, you can easily support any future model.
e.g. Weld, Guice, Spring, ...
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://aspose.com/file-tools
 
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