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need advice

sue raj
Greenhorn

Joined: Mar 20, 2010
Posts: 6
Hello,
I require some career advice. I am in my late thirties. I started of as mainframe programmer, moved to Java development and then moved to storage administration within the same company as prior client went bankrupt. I took a break for my kids. I thought programming job would be better with kids. Therefore I took up a java job but they had software written in early 2000 and did not upgrade any of their code. I got laid off last year.

I have now realized that I have made stupid decisions in my career. I also did not realize that for someone who has been either at school or working all their life, it is hard to keep your mind occupied for 24 hours at home especially with the kids going to school. Earlier if I attended an interview I could get the job but now I am not that confident. I am outdated on storage administration and also Java. Any advice will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance for your assistance.
Gregg Bolinger
GenRocket Founder
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 11, 2001
Posts: 15299
    
    6

Welcome to JavaRanch! One your way in you might have missed the Naming Policy. Please take a moment to read that and modify your display name to meet our requirements.


GenRocket - Experts at Building Test Data
Gregg Bolinger
GenRocket Founder
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 11, 2001
Posts: 15299
    
    6

You failed to mention in your post if you had any goals or if you even know what you want to do with your life, career wise. Do you want to get better at Java? Stay in the storage admin field? For the moment, I'll assume you want to program. It sounds like you have a lot of free time right now. My advice would be to start writing code. You can read some books, maybe think up a project and try and create it using Java (or whatever language you think you might want to learn).

If you don't desire to be a developer then you'll need to give us some insight into what you think you might want to do. Are you in the US, UK, ?? That will also help as there would be folks from those areas that can answer more specifically about job markets, etc.
sue raj
Greenhorn

Joined: Mar 20, 2010
Posts: 6
Thanks for your reply. I do not have EJB, Spring and Hibernate experience. Can you suggest any good books or sites where I could work hands on these technologies. Also I downloaded Eclipse but I am a little confused using it.

I reside in the southwest US. Do you think I can find a job by just learning these technologies although I do not have job experience in these areas. Any reply will be greatly appreciated. I have java programmer and web component developer certifications.

Thanks,

PS: I will change the name in my profile.



Amaan khan
Greenhorn

Joined: Nov 29, 2008
Posts: 14

If you have work exp in web development and certifications too , then its really good, i suggest you to work a bit on 'Struts framework', it has got good demand rite now in market and i guess it will give you enuf chances to survive now. moreover its easy with the help of some good IDEs like MyEclipse and all. Just thot this advice might help you.
NVM, take care and dont worry.


sue raj wrote:Thanks for your reply. I do not have EJB, Spring and Hibernate experience. Can you suggest any good books or sites where I could work hands on these technologies. Also I downloaded Eclipse but I am a little confused using it.

I reside in the southwest US. Do you think I can find a job by just learning these technologies although I do not have job experience in these areas. Any reply will be greatly appreciated. I have java programmer and web component developer certifications.

Thanks,

PS: I will change the name in my profile.



Tim Holloway
Saloon Keeper

Joined: Jun 25, 2001
Posts: 16140
    
  21

You can probably get up to speed faster in storage administration faster than you can in programming, if you're more interested in the operations side of things. Just because people use fewer mainframes doesn't mean that the same old problems don't exist as far as tying up expensive online storage with data that doesn't need to be online - if it should even continue to exist as all. The main difference is that in our new, more "efficient" world, you probably wouldn't get a position solely as a storage administrator, you'd probably have a dozen other duties as well. Welcome to the 21st Century.

If you had to narrow your focus, I'd recommend bypassing EJB, although learn JPA, since it's the way to go for both EJB and Hibernate now. Struts has plenty of current openings, but a lot of them are in maintenance positions. I personally dropped Struts several years back because JSF made me more productive. Plus it's an integral part of JEE 5 and up.

Incidentally, I come from a mainframe background myself, and I spent a few years doing storage administration as well as other things like maintaining the source code management system, administering ROSCOE, and various odds and ends. The only real downside is that I developed the habit of striving for reliability instead of hack-em-out solutions a la PCs, where if a program goes awry people just reboot. Mainframes don't re-IPL just because of a wayward app. At least we'll hope not. Unfortunately, the demand these days is mostly to "Git-R-Dun", not get it right. Gotta turn 'em out fast. And cheap. Lower Prices, Always.


Customer surveys are for companies who didn't pay proper attention to begin with.
sue raj
Greenhorn

Joined: Mar 20, 2010
Posts: 6
Thanks everyone for your input. My storage administration skills are for EMC DMX, clariion etc.. All the job opportunities in Java currently are asking for Spring and Hibernate. So I thought I would concentrate on these two. Is it possible to refer me any book or online resource that will give me practical hands on training with these two technologies.

Sue Raj
Tim Holloway
Saloon Keeper

Joined: Jun 25, 2001
Posts: 16140
    
  21

Manning publications has excellent books on both of these. Also the online docs for Spring and Hibernate are quite good as well. I think you can download them in their entireties as PDFs.

Of course, both Spring and Hibernate are pretty broad projects, so the online docs are divided into various volumes.
Ashu Upadhyaya
Greenhorn

Joined: Sep 27, 2005
Posts: 19
Javapassion is excellent resource from Sun Evangelist: http://www.javapassion.com/

For interview preparation, Java/J2EE Job Interview Companion book is an excellent resource (just search its title in JavaRanch)

Online docs/demo/Projects from Spring, Hibernate, Struts official sites are very good. Just explore them.

Javarach's Bunkhouse has good collection of ref books: http://www.javaranch.com/bunkhouse/books.jsp

Spring - Learn the following concepts -
Dependency Injection / AOP (Aspect Oriented Progg)
Transaction Management
JDBC Templates
ORM support (Hibernate etc)

Learn Struts 1.x.

Best Struts 1.x Books:
----------------------------
Professional Jakarta Struts by James Goodwill and Richard Hightower John Wiley & Sons © 2004 is very easy to follow & covers everything

Do project/framework discussed in this book: Struts.in.Action Manning Pub 2003 is like Bible of Struts (Covers ver 1.x)

Best Spring Books:
------------------------
Spring in Action: http://www.manning.com/walls4/
Pro Spring 2.5: http://www.apress.com/book/view/1590599217
Spring Recipes: http://www.apress.com/book/view/1590599799

Best Hibernate Book: Java Persistence with Hibernate (Manning Publication)
--------------------------

Hibernate Made Easy: Simplified Data Persistence with Hibernate and JPA (Java Persistence API) (PulpJava)
Spring Persistence with Hibernate: http://www.packtpub.com/spring-persistence-with-hibernate/book (packtpub)

All the very best
 
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