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JSF in Action: what experience level?

 
Frank Malinowski
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I am brand new to JSF. I have just started learning Ant and Hibernate. I was planning to start with JSF and Spring next. I have a good bit of experience with the Java Standard Edition. Will it be easy, using your book, for me to start on the road to learning JSF?

Thanks,

Frank
 
Kito Mann
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Frank,

If you've done some web development before -- with Struts or some other type of framework, or if you've done front-end development with JSP, you'll be fine. If you haven't done any web development, there will be a bit of a learning curve. I do provide a brief overview of servlets and JSP and explain concepts like scoped variables along the way, but some of the advanced topics assume that you're at least somewhat familiar with the Servlet API.
 
Chris Gastin
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I have found the transition from Struts to JSF extremely easy. I have several I am considering to port when I get the time. As Kitto said if you done web development there is not much up time to JSF in my opinion
[ August 31, 2004: Message edited by: Chris Gastin ]
 
Ko Ko Naing
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Originally posted by Kito Mann:
Frank,

If you've done some web development before -- with Struts or some other type of framework, or if you've done front-end development with JSP, you'll be fine. If you haven't done any web development, there will be a bit of a learning curve. I do provide a brief overview of servlets and JSP and explain concepts like scoped variables along the way, but some of the advanced topics assume that you're at least somewhat familiar with the Servlet API.


Hi Mr.Kito,
What about the SCWCD? Will they be feel like a breeze to study JSF? But SCWCD does not cover web applications frameworks like Struts... How do u think about that?

I also have started to learn JSF... Since your book is also intended to JSF beginner, it would be great for me as well...
 
Kito Mann
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Originally posted by Ko Ko Naing:


Hi Mr.Kito,
What about the SCWCD? Will they be feel like a breeze to study JSF? But SCWCD does not cover web applications frameworks like Struts... How do u think about that?

I also have started to learn JSF... Since your book is also intended to JSF beginner, it would be great for me as well...


Ko Ko,

I haven't taken the SCWCD exam, so I can only speculate. I would think that familiarity with some sort of framework would help, but I don't think it's necessarily required, as long as you understand servlets and JSP.

The biggest shift for a lot of developers is the fact that JSF is event-oriented, as opposed to request/response oriented like HTTP. If you've worked with Swing, Delphi, VB, or .NET, you should be familar with event-driven programming. If not, it may take a little bit of work to understand. The book, however, spends some time explaining how event-driven programming works.
 
Ko Ko Naing
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Originally posted by Kito Mann:
The biggest shift for a lot of developers is the fact that JSF is event-oriented, as opposed to request/response oriented like HTTP. If you've worked with Swing, Delphi, VB, or .NET, you should be familar with event-driven programming. If not, it may take a little bit of work to understand. The book, however, spends some time explaining how event-driven programming works.


Yes, Mr.Kito, I did have event-driven programming with Swing before and I'm also currently learning SWT also...

But one thing that I doubt is that HTTP request/response is not event-oriented? For instance, if a user click at a button or enter the web address at address bar of browser or clicking a link, then a HTTP request will be made to the server... Isn't it? It's sort of event-oriented, I guess... Could you please explain a bit detail on what you mean by event-orientation? Thanks...
 
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