File APIs for Java Developers
Manipulate DOC, XLS, PPT, PDF and many others from your application.
http://aspose.com/file-tools
The moose likes Jobs Discussion and the fly likes interview result ? Big Moose Saloon
  Search | Java FAQ | Recent Topics | Flagged Topics | Hot Topics | Zero Replies
Register / Login


Win a copy of Soft Skills this week in the Jobs Discussion forum!
JavaRanch » Java Forums » Careers » Jobs Discussion
Bookmark "interview result ?" Watch "interview result ?" New topic
Author

interview result ?

kalyan kapura
Greenhorn

Joined: Apr 28, 2010
Posts: 2
Hi friends, few days back i attended for an interview as a fresher.Its a large scale company. I cleared all the rounds.Next day i got a call from the HR for submission of certificates and asked me for expected salary.I submitted soft copy my certificates 1 week back. But till now I didn't get any response from them my doubt is "Am i selected or not ?" If I am not selected will they ask certificates, expected salary not getting what to do .Is it right to ask the HR about the status of my job ?
fred rosenberger
lowercase baba
Bartender

Joined: Oct 02, 2003
Posts: 11497
    
  16

I have heard that many companies are starting to not bother calling back candidates they don't hire...or put another way, they only call the person/people they DO hire.

A week is not out of line, IMHO. Any company is going to create a list of the top X people. They then would offer the position to #1. If they decline, they offer it to #2, and so forth.

They don't want to call #2 and say "you didn't get it" before they have a positive response from #1.

I also don't think it's out of line to send a friendly note saying something like "I'm still interested in the position if it's available and would love to meet/talk to you some more about it".


There are only two hard things in computer science: cache invalidation, naming things, and off-by-one errors
Henry Wong
author
Sheriff

Joined: Sep 28, 2004
Posts: 19060
    
  40

fred rosenberger wrote:I have heard that many companies are starting to not bother calling back candidates they don't hire...or put another way, they only call the person/people they DO hire.


This trend seems to be so for the last 5 (maybe more) years, and seems very unprofessional in my opinion... the argument here seems to be that they interview more people now, and hence, it takes too long -- which my response is... it is still unprofessional.

Oh well, can't really do anything about it -- especially for a fresher.

Henry


Books: Java Threads, 3rd Edition, Jini in a Nutshell, and Java Gems (contributor)
fred rosenberger
lowercase baba
Bartender

Joined: Oct 02, 2003
Posts: 11497
    
  16

Henry,

I agree it is unprofessional, but as you implied, what can we do about it?
Kj Reddy
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 20, 2003
Posts: 1704
In India mostly jobs for freshers will not be very critical (or not very urgent) to fill immediately. Especially big companies recruit freshers in huge number so, it might take some time to give offer letters(responses). I suggest you to wait for some time or nothing wrong asking the HR about the status. But, same time look for other opportunities too.

Good luck
arun r mehta
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 08, 2010
Posts: 38
Yeah,
Even I noticed this unprofessional behavior from HRs. This is not only with freshers but also with candidates having 1-3 yrs exp. They try to ignore candidates and do not respond to emails.

for instance I cleared all the rounds for the company X on 21st march and I was supposed to get response by 25th march. Their was no communication from them, my consultant told me that I am sure shot selected. I asked for offer letter, my consultant told me that they are getting in touch with HR for the same. But even consultant was unable to reach them.
I tried calling the company but couldnt contact the HR. Dropped 5-6 emails to HR but still no response. I thought they havent selected me and I was looking for some other opportunities. Then finally on 20th april I recieved a mail with offer letter with CTC which was less than which they agreed with me in the interview. I spoke to my consultant, they said they are revising the pay compensation for all the candidates so you can try negotiating.

But the problem is negotiation doest happen in mails or though consultant...I know some % of my CTC is being jammed by consultants only but this was the most unprofessional experience I ever had.

And the company is one of the biggest product development company and has great reputation in the market..


-arun


kalyan kapura
Greenhorn

Joined: Apr 28, 2010
Posts: 2
Thanks friends for your replies finally I called the hr regarding the status.I asked them "Offer letter is the only thing left out ?".
First they said "yes" then again said "No,that we don't know we forwarded your details(certificates and expected salary) to the manager".Can i expect positive feedback?
Seetharaman Venkatasamy
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jan 28, 2008
Posts: 5575

kalyan kapura wrote:Can i expect positive feedback?


third umpire[Manager] need to decide that
Steve Armand
Greenhorn

Joined: May 05, 2010
Posts: 2
I interviewed for a position last summer. Went through two separate phone interviews, then a two hour sit down interview with four different people. I thought the interview went well but apparently it didn't. After two weeks of not hearing anything from them I sent them an email. No response. It is just very frustrating, all I'm asking for is a simple email saying something along the lines "we found someone who is better than you" and I would be happy.

If I do a quick phone interview and the employer isn't interested then no response is fine. But if I go through two phone screens and then an in person interview at least have the decency to let me know the status.
Michael Sullivan
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 26, 2003
Posts: 235
I'm surprised that this hasn't been suggested previously - but it's common practice (for me at least).

1. I write down the first and last name of the interviewers, and ensure I have the mailing address to reach them (main office address is fine)
2. Upon finishing the interview, I ask the highest ranking person (manager or HR) this question: "If I don't hear back from you in a week, can I call?"
3. After I return home, I write thank-you cards and send to each of my interviewers. I try to include something specific in each. Post is better than email here.
4. If I haven't heard back in a week (or other agreed-upon timeframe) I call back and inquire.
5. I continue my job search.


If they say "we'll call you in a week" but do not, I assume that it's a no-go. Whatever I do, I don't sit and wait for a call. See #5.
YOU should set the terms of when you'll hear about the job. It shows that your about getting things done, including getting a job.
Jan Cumps
Bartender

Joined: Dec 20, 2006
Posts: 2516
    
  10

In my country (Belgium) there is a proposal to make the reply from the company mandatory (attention: link to dutch website of a political party - no affiliation).
If this law passes, companies that don't reply can be convicted to pay a fine of up to 500 Euros.
The law would only be applicable for announced jobs, not for "unsolicited solicitations".
The reasoning behind this is that getting no reply is demotivating.

OCUP UML fundamental and ITIL foundation
youtube channel
Rohan kanade
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 22, 2009
Posts: 106
Michael Sullivan wrote:I'm surprised that this hasn't been suggested previously - but it's common practice (for me at least).

1. I write down the first and last name of the interviewers, and ensure I have the mailing address to reach them (main office address is fine)
2. Upon finishing the interview, I ask the highest ranking person (manager or HR) this question: "If I don't hear back from you in a week, can I call?"
3. After I return home, I write thank-you cards and send to each of my interviewers. I try to include something specific in each. Post is better than email here.
4. If I haven't heard back in a week (or other agreed-upon timeframe) I call back and inquire.
5. I continue my job search.


If they say "we'll call you in a week" but do not, I assume that it's a no-go. Whatever I do, I don't sit and wait for a call. See #5.
YOU should set the terms of when you'll hear about the job. It shows that your about getting things done, including getting a job.


you seem to have lot of experience in doing interviews


SCJP 1.6 ,SCWCD 5
Michael Sullivan
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 26, 2003
Posts: 235
As far as my interviewee recommendations - those were handed down from a recruiter friend many, many moons ago - and have served me well.

In a decade of IT work - I've only changed jobs a few times, though I've interviewed a lot of potential candidates in each position I've held. During my undergraduate work - I even took a course on interviewing. That was a very humbling experience as I was cast as both interviewer and interviewee in front of a group of 25 (almost) strangers. There was even a point where we recorded ourselves in both situations, in order to review and adjust our strategies.

Even as my software-development experience grew, interviewing wasn't really comfortable until my technology-vocabulary caught up. These days, I really don't feel that a sit-down, in person, technical Q&A is the best way to gauge a software-developer. I'd rather have a combination of: pseudo-code, code, refactoring, code-review, and test-case generation instead. If the candidate has open-source code for review, great.

arulk pillai
Author
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 31, 2007
Posts: 3274
Good points Michael. How will you go about assessing the non-technical skills?


500+ Java Interview Questions and Answers | Java job hunting know how & Java resumes
Michael Sullivan
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 26, 2003
Posts: 235
Instead of asking purely hypothetical questions (tell me about a time where...) you'd instead assess the candidate in the context of software development. Consider the following:

Scenario 1: code review
Myself and another interviewer act as junior and senior level developers. The candidate is our peer, performing a code review of a feature that we have built. The coding is poor, and there are design issues.

What I'm looking for: Can the candidate find the issues we think they should spot? How does the candidate approach giving us feedback on this code? Does the candidate's approach differ as he talks to a junior vs senior developer? How does the candidate react if we challenge specific assessments? Does the candidate allow us to "talk our way out" of things?


Scenario 2: design review
Myself and another interviewer act as senior level developers. The candidate is our peer, performing a design review of a proposed project. While the design is simple, it solves all the necessary business and technical cases. However, I play the role of technical-bully - insisting that we need to turn the design into an SOA solution residing on an ESB. We need services! We need transaction support! We need BPEL! I interrupt a lot, I fail to listen, and I generally denounce the current design as having poor scalability, performance, and not being enterprise-y enough.

What I'm looking for: How does the candidate handle a bully? How do they handle the loudest voice, with the weakest argument? Can they keep their composure under stress? Do they attack the person, or the problem? Do they hold their ground or back down?


Anyway, I think you get the idea. There are plenty of "in-context" ways to assess non-technical skills.
Pradeep bhatt
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 27, 2002
Posts: 8919

Only 5% companies in India say "sorry, we cannot take you". Others don't communicate. Candidates would have taken leave and pain to attend interviews. Really unprofessional. Companies expect candidates to be professionals though.Strange logic.


Groovy
arulk pillai
Author
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 31, 2007
Posts: 3274
In my experienece, unprofessionalism is very prevalent not only from hiring front, but also from other perspectives like

-- Once hired, you think that you are going to do task x, but end up doing task y.
-- Your contract end date is approaching, but until the last few days the management gives you an indication that the contract is going to be extended, but the last minute come up with excuses like budget has not been allocated, priorities have changed, etc.
-- Many other regular chopping and changing through your emeployment.
-- Someone else taking credit for your work.
-- Not being recognized for your efforts.
-- Conflicting interests, objectives, etc. For example, a talented developer wants to produce the best design/code possible , but the management is keen on minimal changes to meet the budget, to stick to the deadline and at times to look good, and to minize the impact to the other systems.

Nothing much can be done about this. It is a very competitive and complex market out there. Employers are not only demanding technical skills, but also business skills, soft skills, marketing skills, interviewing skills, etc. If they let go of one techie, they can easily hire another techie, but if they let go of some one with good combination of technical skills, business skills, and soft skills, they will find it harder to replace the vacancy, but the business will still move on. As an individual, we have control over ourselves

-- in developing our technical skills, soft skills, networking skills, interviewing skills, marketing skills, etc.
-- in staying positive and moving forward by taking each interview as a free training course and as an opportunity to do a self-assessment as to where I am now and whare I would like to be in x years.
-- in creating more opportunities to choose from
-- in creating more avenues or chaging directions


Some times these unprofessional behaviors are great eye openers for our career growth. You will end up asking yourself, why didn't I do this a lot earlier?

In a nutshell, you will have to look after yourself, and no one else will. Observe and learn from people who make things happen. They would have gone through lots of unprofessional behaviors in their career. If you put yourself in a position to attend and succeed in more interviews and have more avenues to explore through good contacts and better online persona, you will not have the time or inclination to mind these unprofessional behaviors as you have so many other things happening. You will shrug off things easily and at times you will behave unprofessionally by turning down an offer after verbally accepting it, moving on to take a more exciting position or role when your current employer needs you badly, etc.

I am not encouraging you to be unprofessional, but learn to accept and move forward. In many cases, you will find lots of positives out of negative outcomes -- such as not being complacent, learning from your mistakes, motivating yourself to do bigger and better things, etc.
Henry Wong
author
Sheriff

Joined: Sep 28, 2004
Posts: 19060
    
  40

Pradeep bhatt wrote:Only 5% companies in India say "sorry, we cannot take you". Others don't communicate. Candidates would have taken leave and pain to attend interviews. Really unprofessional. Companies expect candidates to be professionals though.Strange logic.



This is actually a trend that I find disturbing -- as the "too busy" argument doesn't fly here. This isn't about a cold call, or a resume submission. This is after you have spent time (sometimes all-day) interviewing candidates. After spending all-day with a candidate, how could you not have a few minutes to writeup a rejection email? Heck, it could even be a form letter, and hence, only take a few seconds.

How one behaves is reflected on the company itself. Think about it. These IT people will find jobs -- obviously elsewhere. And elsewhere could be at the company's customers, or potential customers, at the company's partners, or competitors, and in positions that can indirectly effect the company. Being rude to dozens, or maybe even hundreds of candidates (per job search), will likely haunt the company at a future date. How can anyone not understand that?

Henry
Pushkar Choudhary
Rancher

Joined: May 21, 2006
Posts: 425

Henry Wong wrote:This is after you have spent time (sometimes all-day) interviewing candidates. After spending all-day with a candidate, how could you not have a few minutes to writeup a rejection email?

Only one day? I've had a worse experience very recently.

I had interviewed for a well known MNC for a developer's position for a even more well known Investment Banking giant. And I had undergone a test, 3 telephonic interviews and 2 face-to-face interviews and after all this, they never called back!! I waited for a long time, tried calling them several times and nobody picked up. Finally, after more than a month after my last interview, I was able to catch the HR of the MNC on phone. And the only thing she told me was "the feedback wasn't positive". I asked her some specifics on the feedback, and she couldn't answer! And she never answered her phone again. So, the interview process which had started at the end of April finally ended so abruptly a couple of weeks back.

I thought this was very unprofessional behavior on their (both the MNC and the Investment Bank) side. But then again, who cares what I think!
Pradeep bhatt
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 27, 2002
Posts: 8919

I am surprised to hear that it is happening in US also.
Pradeep bhatt
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 27, 2002
Posts: 8919

Jan Cumps wrote:In my country (Belgium) there is a proposal to make the reply from the company mandatory (attention: link to dutch website of a political party - no affiliation).
If this law passes, companies that don't reply can be convicted to pay a fine of up to 500 Euros.
The law would only be applicable for announced jobs, not for "unsolicited solicitations".
The reasoning behind this is that getting no reply is demotivating.


That is a good idea. Who keeps track of this ? The candidate or govt.
Sandeep Awasthi
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 23, 2003
Posts: 597
arulk pillai wrote: you will behave unprofessionally by turning down an offer after verbally accepting it, moving on to take a more exciting position or role when your current employer needs you badly, etc.


If candidate X has ditched us 3 years back and this is why we are behaving unprofessionally with candidate Y now, well that does not justifies it. It is just an excuse to unprofessional behavior. That also gives impression we have tit for tat culture.
And every candidate is not same. There is no general rule which is applicable to every candidate. And if someone ditched them by accepting offer and not joining them, they should be happy that this unreliable person did not come in their company. But we should not behave unprofessionally with next candidate because he can be different.

Henry Wong wrote:
How one behaves is reflected on the company itself. Think about it. These IT people will find jobs -- obviously elsewhere. And elsewhere could be at the company's customers, or potential customers, at the company's partners, or competitors, and in positions that can indirectly effect the company. Being rude to dozens, or maybe even hundreds of candidates (per job search), will likely haunt the company at a future date. How can anyone not understand that?
Henry

I exactly feel same. They should think where is their focus, why are they doing it and what are they going to achieve by spreading impression that we have unprofessional culture right from our HR consultants. It is not competition who is more smart, candidate or our hr consultants. It is recruitment where employee and employer looking at long term professional relationship.
[Edit] corrected typing mistake.


Sandeep
Campbell Ritchie
Sheriff

Joined: Oct 13, 2005
Posts: 40034
    
  28
Pradeep bhatt wrote: . . . Who keeps track of this ? The candidate or govt.
Only the candidate could keep track of it; the Government would never know.
Henry Wong
author
Sheriff

Joined: Sep 28, 2004
Posts: 19060
    
  40

Campbell Ritchie wrote:
Pradeep bhatt wrote: . . . Who keeps track of this ? The candidate or govt.
Only the candidate could keep track of it; the Government would never know.



I see this law, if passed, as completely not enforceable.

I also see people who will flood the market with resumes, hoping to catch companies with not answering. To be followed by companies solving this with automated answering systems, which of course, follows the letter of the law, if not the spirit.

Henry
Jan Cumps
Bartender

Joined: Dec 20, 2006
Posts: 2516
    
  10

Henry Wong wrote:...

I see this law, if passed, as completely not enforceable.

I also see people who will flood the market with resumes, hoping to catch companies with not answering. To be followed by companies solving this with automated answering systems, which of course, follows the letter of the law, if not the spirit.

Henry
The piece that is already in place:

Government department responsible for employment keeps track of open posts (they get the info from companies with vacant positions). They do a skill match with a registry of unemployed people (you register with he department when you leave school, or when an assignment ends). They then ask the unemployed to contact these companies, and to apply for the vacant jobs.

The department tracks how active you are searching for a new job. If you are not actively searching, the department might withdraw your right to receive your monthly "unemployed money".
The way you prove that you are actively searching, is by providing a list of companies you have written to, or interviews you went to.


The enforcement part: they are thinking about denying access to the skill matching service (and to financial advantages that companies can get when they hire an unemployed) to companies that do not send a reply to application letters or interviews.

(note: this is not a political opinion I am stating here. I am writing down how it works)
Sandeep Awasthi
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 23, 2003
Posts: 597
Pushkar Choudhary wrote:
Only one day? I've had a worse experience very recently.

I had interviewed for a well known MNC for a developer's position for a even more well known Investment Banking giant. And I had undergone a test, 3 telephonic interviews and 2 face-to-face interviews and after all this, they never called back!! I waited for a long time, tried calling them several times and nobody picked up. Finally, after more than a month after my last interview, I was able to catch the HR of the MNC on phone. And the only thing she told me was "the feedback wasn't positive". I asked her some specifics on the feedback, and she couldn't answer! And she never answered her phone again. So, the interview process which had started at the end of April finally ended so abruptly a couple of weeks back.

I thought this was very unprofessional behavior on their (both the MNC and the Investment Bank) side. But then again, who cares what I think!


I tried to understand what their problem is. I had to do research. Their problem is not your skills or you have any problem. Their problem is their HR consultancy company thinks too far out of the box. Probably they have been trained very hard to think out of the box. They are thought leader in HR consultancy. They believe in making simple things more and more complex. For example in some forum debate if you promote struts 1.x, then they will assume you do not know anything else than struts 1.x. They will not even bother to think that it was some other context in forum debate where you promoted struts 1.x. If you have been interviewed for Hibernate, they will send you JD which has ESB, web services , ws*, uml .... list is endless and you will get scared.
Vally Sko
Greenhorn

Joined: Apr 28, 2010
Posts: 9
Very interesting to read.
Gaurav Raje
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 23, 2010
Posts: 136
Thanks to this attitude, i can say, i have never been rejected by any company ..... The company which didnot like me just didnot bother to call
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://aspose.com/file-tools
 
subject: interview result ?