wood burning stoves*
The moose likes Architect Certification (SCEA/OCMJEA) and the fly likes PMP or SCEA Big Moose Saloon
  Search | Java FAQ | Recent Topics | Flagged Topics | Hot Topics | Zero Replies
Register / Login


Win a copy of The Java EE 7 Tutorial Volume 1 or Volume 2 this week in the Java EE forum
or jQuery UI in Action in the JavaScript forum!
JavaRanch » Java Forums » Certification » Architect Certification (SCEA/OCMJEA)
Bookmark "PMP or SCEA" Watch "PMP or SCEA" New topic
Author

PMP or SCEA

Yogaraj Khanal
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 06, 2007
Posts: 40
I think SCEA is too costly exam I am planning to give PMP since I already have jee skills I don't need a certificate to show those?
Any suggestions that I should do SCEA instead of preparing for PMP?


Raj
Jim Hoglund
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jan 09, 2008
Posts: 525
I think PMP is a good credential, but of course the work is very different
than software development. Many folks wear both hats however, so I
suppose this may be your plan too. Have you managed many projects
where you can document your PM work? The PMP application asks for
4,500 hours of previous PM experience. PMI will audit your application,
asking others about your PM work. There is a PMP-Lite where you can
take the exam and add PM experience later. Good luck.

Jim ... ...


BEE MBA PMP SCJP-6
Teja Saab
Rancher

Joined: Mar 08, 2010
Posts: 152
Yogaraj Khanal wrote:I think SCEA is too costly exam I am planning to give PMP since I already have jee skills I don't need a certificate to show those?
Any suggestions that I should do SCEA instead of preparing for PMP?



You are comparing apples and oranges. You have to make a decision if you want to be a project manager with technical skills or if you want to be an architect with project management skills. They are both complementary, however very different. You need to decide which will be your core competence and then complement it with the other.

I am a PMP since 2003 and am currently in the final stages of my SCEA completion. Since one of your criterion to make a decision seems to be the cost of PMP vs the cost of SCEA, you need to be aware that PMP involves a recurring cost while SCEA is a one time cost of $900 (assuing that you are in the US). You need to renew the PMP credential every 3 years by paying around $150. You also need to accumulate 60 PDUs, which will probably set you back by a few hundred dollars as well.

SCEA 5, SCJD,SCWCD,SCJP,PMP,IBM-SOA Solution designer,IBM-XML
Donovan Johnson
Greenhorn

Joined: May 13, 2010
Posts: 11

If you can afford it, both. If not SCEA and Project+.


I know. But they have revamped it, and Hiring Managers are starting to respect the CompTIA brand. Not to mention, some of the revamps [nearly all the prominent CompTIA exams -- including Project+ -- have been revamped over the last 18 months] are showing real progress. Example, Security+ now has 6 of the 10 domains included in the CISSP. And btw, Sec+ and CEH are now required by the Federal Government.


Everything depends on circumstances; you must sail according to the wind.
Jim Hoglund
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jan 09, 2008
Posts: 525
Donovan : I am confused by your comments about Project+, etc. How would this
apply toward the PMP credential from PMI? Can you elaborate a bit? Thanks.

Jim ... ...
Donovan Johnson
Greenhorn

Joined: May 13, 2010
Posts: 11

Essentially, People sometimes focus on a credential as a means of obtaining prestige or opportunity, rather than build a career narrative that progresses like a pyramid.

What does that mean? An individual goes for the crowning achievement when there's no prerequisite requirement. But in focusing on the crown, they miss the options that are afford those who have the entry and middle tier certs/designations. I am arguing that a SCEA and Project+ candidate will beat an SCEA only
candidate, all other things being equal. PMP would obviously be more desirable, but sometimes it is not a viable option for the near future.

Having no project management credential means that you have to site a verifiable instance of managing a project. When dealing with an external hiring manager or hope that an internal opportunity presents itself. Conversely, if you at least have Project+, you increase the chance that someone will take the chance that you have the basic skills to get the job done. If you're daunted by the initial cost or on-going fees of PMP, Project+ could provide a alternative to no credential at all.
All and all, you could think of the Project+ as a warm up to the PMP, with the added benefit of opening a door or two now, instead of waiting for the experience.
Jim Hoglund
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jan 09, 2008
Posts: 525
Thanks. It sounds like Project+ is very IT focused, as compared to the more
general PMP. IT projects are big at PMI as are many other kinds of projects
(e.g. construction, education, infrastructure, non-profits, and lots of industrial
engineering stuff). I wonder how the base knowledge areas and management
philosophies line up between Project+ and PMP.

Jim ... ...
Donovan Johnson
Greenhorn

Joined: May 13, 2010
Posts: 11

Well that is kind of what I was eluding to. The big knock against CompTIA was that there credentials were pretty cookie cutter, and since most were originally intended to be entry level, vendor-neutral certifications, this was seen as fine. The problem was that if they were to have been vendor-neutral, they should have lined up with some sort of standard that that was truly universal. Without that, it gave an evaluator an poor idea about the certificate holder's basic skills in this area. Many manager's complained that CompTIA presented certificate holders with results that were untrustworthy. Until recently.

I can tell you that now, both are tests [Project+ and the PMP]are based on the PMBOK. Nearly everyone making Project+ training material are selling it as a good stepping stone for the PMP. Additionally, I don't think that a Project+ by itself will doing anything for you, but accompanied by SCSA, MCSE, or an SCEA and suddenly, this becomes a potential separator between you and the competition to get hired and maybe even being given a PM or Application Architect role on a smaller project. And that's the goal right?
Yogaraj Khanal
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 06, 2007
Posts: 40
Thanks friends for responding my post. I have done PMP recently.
Again thought of doing SCEA but seems Oracle is charging too much for it so giving up my plan.
I have already working in J2EE and .NET for a while now in different technologies and tiers so I don't think I need certificaiton here.
I am planning to go for Network Security certification now.I have selected three please advise which one is good.
CISSP
CCNA Security +
CompTIA Security +
again I am comparing here in terms of time money Continue education requirement
Any feedback appreciated.
Thanks,
Yogaraj Khanal,MA,PMP
Eduardo Mineo
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 26, 2011
Posts: 63

Hi Yogaraj. I know SCEA/OCMJEA became expensive, but you should consider to take the 3 tests in order to tough your knowledge up. I have a great experience in J2EE, but getting prepared for the test has put my knowledge all together and gave me cohesion. I know Oracle won't give you the certification without taking the mandatory course, but you can still show people your pass grade.

All the same, I'm taking ITILv3 Foundation this week. I'm very tired, since I just submitted my OCMJEA essay and I got no time to rest between OCJP (August), OCMJEA(Set) and ITIL(Oct), but I'm achieving my plan for this year. And this thread were very nice. I didn't know Project+ and I would like to get some Project Management certification, although I have no experience, so Project+ is very interesting to show people I have some knowledge in management. Maybe in Feb I take Project+.

Best wishes

--eduardo
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://aspose.com/file-tools
 
subject: PMP or SCEA