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How to handle experience problem

Vladimir Vucetic
Greenhorn

Joined: Jul 09, 2010
Posts: 10
I have worked as a Adobe Flex (mostly AIR) developer for almost two years. This was my first job. I started college in 2006 work in a company from 2008, finished college in 2009. Everything I learned on that job was 'damn' flex. In my city there is no more flex jobs, but there is three Java companies. So I apply for jobs in these companies. And I was rejected. Reason was that I have no experience in Java, and I don't have experience but I'am learning. So I recently apply for "Junior level Java position" and again rejected because I must have at least 1.5-2 years of Java experience (junior level) So I'am wondering now. If nobody can't give me job because of lack of experience, what should I do now? I have good general knowledge of programming, I work with .NET in college, now I am learning core Java and it goes pretty fine, but who is going to believe me without experience. I am sorry if if my question is too stupid but I can't handle this situation alone I wonder what to do if I continue to learn Java for the next 6 months and at job interview a get answer "..sorry you don;t have experience we can't hire you!"...desperate...
Jeanne Boyarsky
author & internet detective
Marshal

Joined: May 26, 2003
Posts: 30916
    
158

Vladimir,
It's tough because there are a lot of unemployed people who do have experience in Java.

Are you still in college? If so, that changes the equation. Companies don't general expect entry level people to have real world experience.


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Jeanne Boyarsky
author & internet detective
Marshal

Joined: May 26, 2003
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Also - as far as experience goes, you can get some on projects outside of a job or open source work.
Vladimir Vucetic
Greenhorn

Joined: Jul 09, 2010
Posts: 10

Are you still in college?

No. That hell is done

Companies don't general expect entry level people to have real world experience.

Seems that some expect. Job title is "Junior" but "Junior with experience"
I am 24 years now, am I too late to gain junior level experience?
Jeanne Boyarsky
author & internet detective
Marshal

Joined: May 26, 2003
Posts: 30916
    
158

Entry level and junior aren't necessarily the same thing.

Entry level may not require experience, but junior does. You do have experience although not in Java. Some companies are ok with 1-2 years experience in something. Clearly the companies in your area are not. Which means alternate forms of experience (like contributing something to open source) are going to matter more.
Jimmy Clark
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 16, 2008
Posts: 2187
I suggest that you stop focusing only on "Java." There are many, many other software development positions that have nothing to do with Java. Since on you state the you have .NET experience, then you should also be looking for .NET jobs as well as studying .NET material. I think this approach will help you find a "job" faster than if you only focuson Java and spend "waste" time trying to find an open-source project or some sort of programming community service.
Vladimir Vucetic
Greenhorn

Joined: Jul 09, 2010
Posts: 10

I suggest that you stop focusing only on "Java." There are many, many other software development positions that have nothing to do with Java. Since on you state the you have .NET experience, then you should also be looking for .NET jobs as well as studying .NET material. I think this approach will help you find a "job" faster than if you only focuson Java and spend "waste" time trying to find an open-source project or some sort of programming community service.

That is problem. Three companies in town all three Java based. That is the reason why I start learning Java. Few days ago I moved focus a little on PHP. But then again it is only freelance jobs. And PHP comes from different story. I used Adobe Flex fully OO support. I am familiar with MVC, Building GUI, some patterns, databases, ORM's, OOP but nobody asks for that when I came to job interview, only "...how much you work with Java...". I don't know anymore how to direct career...

Jimmy Clark
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 16, 2008
Posts: 2187
In my city there is no more flex jobs, but there is three Java companies.


That is problem. Three companies in town all three Java based.


If you have already interviewed with these three organizations and did not get an offer. Then you most likely need to move on. It seems like you may have to consider moving away from your "town" or "city."

That aside, as I suggested, when looking for potential positions that are not in your "town" or "city", you should cast a wider net and include positions that are not only Java-based. .NET is an exciting technology, Shell programming is also pretty fun, Graphic Design and multimedia software engineering with Adobe Flash and Adobe Director is also cool. If you only want to write "Java" code, you may be unemployed for a very long time...

Lingo is a very powerful object-oriented programming language, check it out
Jeanne Boyarsky
author & internet detective
Marshal

Joined: May 26, 2003
Posts: 30916
    
158

That's a good point. If there are only three companies and one has interviewed with all three, they have records saying they don't want you for the near future.
Henry Wong
author
Sheriff

Joined: Sep 28, 2004
Posts: 18978
    
  40


The big issue here is that there are just too many people chasing too few jobs. It's pretty bad out there right now. And there is absolutely no reason for companies to offer training these days.... In some areas, the "experience dilemma" doesn't have a solution.

Henry


Books: Java Threads, 3rd Edition, Jini in a Nutshell, and Java Gems (contributor)
Gaurav Raje
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 23, 2010
Posts: 136
well this is how i am doing it... Applicable only to entry jobs.
1) Open source is the key. Try new projects with good stuff. Many projects out there. Try kernel debugging. Have some definite result.
2) Papers. Try research. One publication on your resume can boost your status many folds if it is an entry level fresher position.
3) Certifications. Try SCJP. It is a decent start for a good career.

All said and done, these will never cover your experience. But it will help in giving you that edge in entry level positions. After which, getting jobs will be comparitively simpler.

Also try a Masters Degree. It will give you a truckload of knowledge and exposure. I never regretted going for one.
 
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