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What should I study next?

Allan A Peak
Greenhorn

Joined: Sep 20, 2010
Posts: 16
I've been studying the Head First Java book at work, and I have the Java For Dummies Reference at home, but haven't done much with that yet. I feel comfortable with Head First, but after sitting in on a teleconference at work, I can tell there's a gap between what I know and what I need to know. The guy mentioned "Refactoring" and a "Spring" framework, neither of which I know anything about. Do you have any recommendations for something to study to improve my Java knowledge?
David Newton
Author
Rancher

Joined: Sep 29, 2008
Posts: 12617

Refactoring has nothing to do with Java--it's a process, not a framework. Search the web for "refactoring".

For Spring information start with the Spring tutorials available on the Spring site. We have a Spring forum here for Spring-specific questions.
Campbell Ritchie
Sheriff

Joined: Oct 13, 2005
Posts: 39408
    
  28
And welcome to the Ranch
Hebert Coelho
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 14, 2010
Posts: 754

Hello, Allan. Welcome to Javaranch.

First - I would say to study OO. A good knowledge in OO it will make you understand a lot of concepts of Java.
Second - Studing about WebComponents it will help you understand a lot how Spring works.
Third - Go fo Spring. [=

The refactoring you heard it's very used in TDD. If you work with it you can take a look at it before spring.

It will help you more.


[uaiHebert.com] [Full WebApplication JSF EJB JPA JAAS with source code to download] One Table Per SubClass [Web/JSF]
David Newton
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Rancher

Joined: Sep 29, 2008
Posts: 12617

Hebert Coelho wrote:Second - Studing about WebComponents it will help you understand a lot how Spring works.

No, studying Dependency Injection (DI) and Inversion of Control (IoC) will help you understand how Spring works: everything in Spring is predicated on it.
The refactoring you heard it's very used in TDD.

More like TDD makes refactoring easier and more reliable: refactoring is independent of development methodology.
Matthew Brown
Bartender

Joined: Apr 06, 2010
Posts: 4421
    
    8

Hebert Coelho wrote:The refactoring you heard it's very used in TDD.

Just an observation, and I may be doing Allan a disservice, but if someone doesn't know what refactoring and Spring are, there's a fair chance they won't recognise an abbreviation like TDD as well.
Allan A Peak
Greenhorn

Joined: Sep 20, 2010
Posts: 16
Matthew Brown wrote:
Hebert Coelho wrote:The refactoring you heard it's very used in TDD.

Just an observation, and I may be doing Allan a disservice, but if someone doesn't know what refactoring and Spring are, there's a fair chance they won't recognise an abbreviation like TDD as well.


You're right. The guy at the teleconference mentioned TDD, but all I know about it was the very little I could understand from his examples. Apparently, I have even more to learn than I thought.
Hebert Coelho
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 14, 2010
Posts: 754

David Newton wrote:
Hebert Coelho wrote:Second - Studing about WebComponents it will help you understand a lot how Spring works.

No, studying Dependency Injection (DI) and Inversion of Control (IoC) will help you understand how Spring works: everything in Spring is predicated on it.
I was saying like that the WebComponent study will help him with request/response/JSP/Libraries/Deploy etcs. [=
David Newton
Author
Rancher

Joined: Sep 29, 2008
Posts: 12617

Hebert Coelho wrote:I was saying like that the WebComponent study will help him with request/response/JSP/Libraries/Deploy etcs.

Oh. I guess I never saw anybody ask about web stuff in this thread.
C Martes
Greenhorn

Joined: Sep 21, 2010
Posts: 6
Just commiserating.

From one greenhorn to another, it's bewildering how many different frameworks and such there are to learn everywhere you turn. It's hard for me to get through a single good tutorial without running down all sorts of other trails to just understand what certain acronyms mean (not even how such a framework or toolset works).

But one thing I have definitely found is that osmosis over time is having an effect.

Personally, I found the Head First Java book leaving me scratching my head a lot. It started off super slow when talking about OO stuff. But I got about 1/2 way thru the book and realized that if an intruder broke into my house and said I had to compile one single java class or else he'd shoot me...well, I wouldn't be typing.

I found the Sams Teach Yourself Java in 24 Hours a much more hands on book. Not as detailed in some areas, but it makes you code every single hour. In the Head First book, I got absolutely nothing out of those stupid code examples whose goal is to produce output like 9, 212, 5, e, 84.2. There's no logical reason to write a program to do that so the thought process you have to go through to "fill in the missing snippets" just hones your trial-and-error skills.

If you like web stuff, I have enjoyed Murach's Servlets and JSP's.

Also, if you use NetBeans, there is an OUTSTANDING ecommerce tutorial...probably the best tutorial I have gone through.

Best of luck.
David Newton
Author
Rancher

Joined: Sep 29, 2008
Posts: 12617

C Martes wrote:But I got about 1/2 way thru the book and realized that if an intruder broke into my house and said I had to compile one single java class or else he'd shoot me...well, I wouldn't be typing.

How can that be? It has you compiling and running code out of the gate, no?
There's no logical reason to write a program to do that so the thought process you have to go through to "fill in the missing snippets" just hones your trial-and-error skills.

No logical reason you've thought of, perhaps. Its approach is very deliberate.
W. Joe Smith
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 10, 2009
Posts: 710
David Newton wrote:
C Martes wrote:But I got about 1/2 way thru the book and realized that if an intruder broke into my house and said I had to compile one single java class or else he'd shoot me...well, I wouldn't be typing.

How can that be? It has you compiling and running code out of the gate, no?


Since I have it handy, page xxvii of HFJ states:


10) Type and run the code.


Personally, I never found a point in HFJ where I didn't need to code something.


SCJA
When I die, I want people to look at me and say "Yeah, he might have been crazy, but that was one zarkin frood that knew where his towel was."
C Martes
Greenhorn

Joined: Sep 21, 2010
Posts: 6
Don't get me wrong. I think the head first concept (visual examples that parallel real world) are great.

But as I recall, most (maybe all?) of the end of chapter exercises don't involve you coding and compiling. I'm not saying you don't write any code. It's just not integral to the text like it is in other books.

If you're an experienced programmer, maybe it doesn't matter that much. But I got much more out of other books that had you constantly writing and compiling all the way through.

As for the end of chapter exercises, I personally got nothing from trying to write code to produce nonsensical output (like a random sequence of numbers). I found most other texts work through more pactical examples that for me do a better job of illustrating the concepts taught.

But to each his own. There are like a million people on Amazon who wrote favorable reviews of the HF book. I just personally got more out of others.
santoshkumar savadatti
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 27, 2010
Posts: 95
Martes, what you experienced is very common.
I think if you are a beginner, it is a good idea to use tqo (or maybe more) books.I was reading a "serious" book. Since i had C++ beackground, i got through most of it.But, at some point, i got stuck (some later chapter).
No, the book was fine. The problem was that reading a book continuously (even if you write code) made it monotonous.Thats when I picked up HFJ.
Its simple and fun approach made what i already learnt to stick and helped me move further.
So, its a good idea to have more than one book. Each one will have its own depth and style and you wont get bored.

santoshkumar savadatti
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 27, 2010
Posts: 95
First - I would say to study OO. A good knowledge in OO it will make you understand a lot of concepts of Java.
Second - Studing about WebComponents it will help you understand a lot how Spring works.
Third - Go fo Spring. [=


Herbert, by web components do you mean J2EE or EJB?
Please provide more detail. I am a greenhorn, so
 
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