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Question: Which of both JSF or JSP is betterfor to build my own CMS?

Hugo Alberto Bedolla
Greenhorn

Joined: Nov 09, 2010
Posts: 17
Hello everybody :

I ask this as I'm not JSF expert and this, probably, would be my first experience with JSF as development framework.

I'm looking around the current available technologies for to build web-oriented applications, in terms of adequacy, suitability and development speed. I'm in front to decide which of that technologies to use for to build my own CMS, as I feel no one CMS in the market is suitable for my requirements. One of this technologies is Java Server Faces, so, right now I'm reading some book for to know pros and cons, but I'm confused if JSF is the right technology for a project as big as this .

I mean:

I've the sensation JSF is post-behavior and form-behavior oriented. So, I'm looking that there are nice components that implements the right behavior for me in each case I need for a form-based web page, but, what happens when I need to build a completely dynamic web page where each complex component is filled with info that depends on parameters I'm sending to the server? (As you know, tipically you get that dynamic behavior with GET parameters, so when you call a section you do section=products and for products something like products=donuts). For example, I need several dynamic component instances that are only wrappers for that information, and each dynamic component instance needs to be customized by my back-end CMS (So, I can create some instance of that component and to implement a completely different behavior and presentation for that component instance attached to a specific section). My focus (I mean, the behavior of almost all the CMS I think) is to configure my component instance for each section, and so, each component instance looks and behaves different for each one, depending on what parameters I configured for my component instance.

Another thing I'm confused about is the XML declarative style for navigation rules . It looks at first glance very hard to define each navigation rule in only one XML, as if I have 2,000 complex navigation rules into my CMS there is no way for to manage from a simple XML from my point of view. I know that navigation rules are adequate if you are needing to change the routing, and this same can be a strength better than weakness, but it looks too hard to manage at only one XML location.

I remember: This is my perception, I've not development experience about. As I'm not JSF expert, this kind of knowledge about the possibilities of this technology is not in my hands right now, and I don't like to begin a cumbersome effort that will waste my time. I'm considering JSF as is component-oriented and I need to build very specialized but yet customizable components that will do the trick. Obviously it will have for me a learning curve but if it solves my needs I'm disposed to follow that way. By the other, I'm enabled to follow a JSP/Servlet oriented development at any time, but I like to give an opportunity to possibly better approaches.

I would desire to know experiences and suggestions. Any comment about will be appreciated . Thanks in advance.
Sai Hegde
security forum advocate
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 26, 2010
Posts: 200
    
    1

JSF is a framework while JSP's are just a presentation technology. For the requirements that you state, JSF can be used reliably.
For the navigation rules, if you had problems working with XML declaration, you should use the built in editors that Eclipse or any latest IDE would provide to define your page flow.

Tim Holloway
Saloon Keeper

Joined: Jun 25, 2001
Posts: 16068
    
  21

You can define multiple faces-config xmls if if makes the application development work better. Or use JSF2 and annotations, which gets rid of most of the need for navigation rules in XML.

As far as using JSP goes, you can either user JSP in conjunction with a framework such as Struts or you can go the suicide route by embedding the logic in JSPs. That solution, however, gets very ugly very fast.


Customer surveys are for companies who didn't pay proper attention to begin with.
Hugo Alberto Bedolla
Greenhorn

Joined: Nov 09, 2010
Posts: 17
Tim Holloway wrote:You can define multiple faces-config xmls if if makes the application development work better. Or use JSF2 and annotations, which gets rid of most of the need for navigation rules in XML.

As far as using JSP goes, you can either user JSP in conjunction with a framework such as Struts or you can go the suicide route by embedding the logic in JSPs. That solution, however, gets very ugly very fast.



Mmm... I think the last approach is the worst approach, as in terms of ease of maintenance it would become a painful way... I was not warned about JSF2 does it straightforward with annotations, what I think is a better approach than XML-based navigation; it simplifies my vision about JSF.

I'll write some basic use cases including some complex dynamic component using JSF + EJB3 and the same with JSP/Servlet + EJB3 for comparing ease of development, scalability, suitability and performance, before to start a full development effort. Anyway, I'm looking around another approaches like the JSF/EJB3 based-solution JBoss Seam, so possibly I'll do some other testing with another frameworks and approaches.

Thanks Sai Hedge, Tim Holloway for your feedback .
Brendan Healey
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 12, 2009
Posts: 218

It's simple - JSP is yesterday's technology - JSF is now. You can still make things work, but
at a cost. JSF is pretty damned good really, however I'd have to say that I'm looking forward
to v2.1., there are still lots of peculiar things going on with 2.0.3.
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
Marshal

Joined: Jan 10, 2002
Posts: 61224
    
  66

Brendan Healey wrote:It's simple - JSP is yesterday's technology - JSF is now

You forgot to add "in my opinion". There are many who are less than thrilled with JSF.


[Asking smart questions] [Bear's FrontMan] [About Bear] [Books by Bear]
Brendan Healey
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 12, 2009
Posts: 218

I've been a professional software engineer for 27 years now and I've gone past
the point of pussy-footing about. When I've got something to say it gets said. There
are significant issues with JSF for sure, not least the concerns that are shared by
many over the new custodians of this technology. However I am fail to see how it
would serve anyone to commence a project based on JSP as their view display
technology, I look at this as past sell-by-date.

JSF is extremely hard to work with at this point in time, but what you have to do
is work with the people doing the hard work, to make things better, and that's why
I'm still up at 2am.

No software product is ever really good until v3, so they say....

Regards,
Brendan.
Brendan Healey
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 12, 2009
Posts: 218
Bear, I'd like to apologise for my previous post - I was being an asshole. Wrong end of
a bad day, however that's no excuse, I was wrong and I hold my hands up to that.

Regards,
Brendan.
 
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