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Why mostly architects or authors use Mac than software developer’s population use of PC's?

Amandeep Singh
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 17, 2008
Posts: 845
I have been to many java conferences, I saw most of great architect people do use Mac.
Example- What difference it makes when using eclipse or running JBOSS on Mac vs PC?
I assume when running on windows, you go thru pain of eclipse hanging again. I have installed different versions of eclipse ranging from lighter to heavier version in terms of performance.
Then switched to Ubuntu, soon to realize I am spending more time on configuration issues than actual work. A lot of software compatibility issues.

Now my eyes are set on Mac. Not sure if would be a smooth experience or not as a programmer.

Can you let me know benefits for programmers when using Mac vs PC?


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Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
Marshal

Joined: Jan 10, 2002
Posts: 61658
    
  67

For me, it comes down to what I want to spend my time doing. And for me, that's "getting stuff done" (which includes "having fun" as well as getting work done) rather than tinkering with the OS.

With Windows, I spend far too much time tinkering to keep things stable. I found that with Linux, I spent no less time tinkering -- it was just a tinkering of a very different sort.

With OS X, I spend all my time "getting stuff done".

Here's a few other points that are important to me:
  • A real Unix command line
  • Inherent usability
  • Great tools (Time Machine, etc)
  • Ability to run Windows when I need to (for testing)


  • With OS X, Apple has achieved something no one else has been able to do: create a consumer-viable Unix implementation.


    P.S. Mac, not MAC. (I fixed your post). Mac is short for macintosh; MAC is a network hardware address.


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    Maneesh Godbole
    Saloon Keeper

    Joined: Jul 26, 2007
    Posts: 10523
        
        9

    A few months back I was travelling, and at the airport security check, I was flanked by two anal retentive boss type gentlemen. One of them brandished his shiny new Dell. The other one whisked out his teeny weenie Sony Vaio (I mean wtf!) It somehow happened both then glanced at my unshaven mug, long hair and jeans. I calmly eased out my Mac and their eyes practically popped out.
    Priceless!


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    Bert Bates
    author
    Sheriff

    Joined: Oct 14, 2002
    Posts: 8883
        
        5
    +1 what Bear said...

    Once in a while my Mac will start to get a little sluggish... Then I'll notice that I have 20 windows open, a couple of unix terminal windows, a couple of spreadsheets. Word (ugh), a few browser windows, a few finder windows...

    Then I'll remember that I haven't rebooted for a couple of weeks.

    That kind of reliability never, ever happened for me when I used other OSes.


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    Amandeep Singh
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Jul 17, 2008
    Posts: 845
    Following things I did to my vista PC, to make it smooth-

    1) Installed tune up utilities, it would auto maintenance every week
    2) Installed Microsoft essentials antivirus, I don't have to worry, it is excellent antivirus before that i used to waste time vs McAfee vs Norton vs avg. It runs every week automated
    3) I get lot of free softwares, work like charm with PC.
    4) Installed hard-disk def-rag software runs every week

    Now I can say my PC is running smooth. No performance issues even after months.

    This was all the tinkering I did to make it run smooth. Now only concern left is which is fast when running Java programming tools.
    Bear Bibeault
    Author and ninkuma
    Marshal

    Joined: Jan 10, 2002
    Posts: 61658
        
      67

    I certainly don't want to turn this into the tired old Mac vs. PC argument. You asked a question, I answered it.

    But to point out the obvious:

    1) Unnecessary on OS X
    2) Unnecessary on OS X
    3) I get lots of free software ("software" is never pluralized) for OS X
    4) Unnecessary on OS X

    You've actually made my point. Most Windows user become so use to having to tinker that you don't even think it's tinkering anymore. I don't care how easy it is to set up anti-virus, or disk defraggers, or other tune-up utilities. I don't want to have to bother with any of that. And I don't.

    If all that doesn't bother you, and you're perfectly happy with Windows, then by all means stick with it. But for me, I find having to deal with all that completely unacceptable.
    Adam Richards
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Nov 03, 2005
    Posts: 135
    THe other replies are correct--this "religious" debate's been going on for years. Some folk prefer Macs for ease for use, but if you go that route, be prepared to pay a hefty premium for the convenience. For some people the extra cost is worth it. For me, it's not: I think you get a lot more bang for the buck with a PC. IMHO.
    Bert Bates
    author
    Sheriff

    Joined: Oct 14, 2002
    Posts: 8883
        
        5
    Hi Adam,

    I hear your opinion a fair amount, and I have trouble understanding it. You say that Mac users pay a hefty premium, but shouldn't you also put a value on the hours PC users will spend twiddling with their OS and with virus handling and so on?
    Bear Bibeault
    Author and ninkuma
    Marshal

    Joined: Jan 10, 2002
    Posts: 61658
        
      67

    It can be very successfully argued -- as it has been many times -- that counting the value of time and other TCO factors like resale value and machine longevity, Macs are much more cost-effective than PCs.

    But as I said, if you're happy with your choice, I'm not going to try and convince anyone otherwise. I'm just trying to answer the OP's question on why many of us prefer OS X and Macs to Windows. YMMV.
    Mark Spritzler
    ranger
    Sheriff

    Joined: Feb 05, 2001
    Posts: 17259
        
        6

    I think of it like this, I get a bigger bang for my buck with my Mac because it is really three machines in one. I run Mac OSX, Windows XP and Ubuntu all at the same time and easily switch between them with CTRL-1, CTRL-2 and CTRL-3 keystrokes.

    I have IDEs running in all three OSs at the same time. I have RAD in Windows running with a Websphere App Server running. SpringToolSuite built on Eclipse and Intellij running on my OSx and IntelliJ running on my Ubuntu and my machine is still running just as fast. I can even open MS Office in Windows too.

    I know I could never get that performance or ability on a PC.

    Mark


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    Amandeep Singh
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Jul 17, 2008
    Posts: 845
    Mark you are surprising me so fast. I feel the pain when I am using eclipse 3.6.1 with Jboss tools installed and Jboss server running.

    Maneesh Godbole
    Saloon Keeper

    Joined: Jul 26, 2007
    Posts: 10523
        
        9

    Mark Spritzler wrote:... and easily switch between them with CTRL-1, CTRL-2 and CTRL-3 keystrokes.

    Mark,
    What are you using to run 3 OS simultaneously?
    Lance Colton
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Nov 25, 2010
    Posts: 64

    I just found software development on linux based platforms is more intuitive, on windows I lack a terminal which makes me just feel naked and have to jump through version control hoops etc. and on mac theres also several hoops depending on what you're trying to achieve (ex. you have to register an account to download a c compiler.) java development is mostly painless on mac, jobs isn't very fond of it however:

    Markoff: “And what are you thinking about Flash and Java?”

    Jobs: “Java’s not worth building in. Nobody uses Java anymore. It’s this big heavyweight ball and chain.” -quote enough to make me never want to develop on mac regardless xD

    on linux you just pop open the package manager, select, install, and begin writing.


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    Andrew Monkhouse
    author and jackaroo
    Marshal Commander

    Joined: Mar 28, 2003
    Posts: 11509
        
      95

    Lance Colton wrote:... on mac theres also several hoops depending on what you're trying to achieve (ex. you have to register an account to download a c compiler.)

    No you don't, the C compiler (and a complete IDE) is on the DVD that comes with your Mac. That is one thing that is not installed by default, but it is at least there.

    Lance Colton wrote: java development is mostly painless on mac, jobs isn't very fond of it however:

    By that measurement, you will not do Java development anywhere. Microsoft is not fond of it, and many Linux environments disdain it because it is not 100% open source (according to the FLOSS standard). So if you want the Oracle/Sun Java, you usually have to go through the extra step of explicitly stating that you are willing to download packages that do not conform to the FLOSS definition of free. Or download direct from Oracle/Sun.

    Note that I am not saying that this is difficult, or that it hinders you getting it up and running. I am just saying that having Jobs downplay Java on Mac is really not an issue.

    Lance Colton wrote: on linux you just pop open the package manager, select, install, and begin writing.

    On Mac you just have to turn it on, and start writing.


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    Jason Cone
    Greenhorn

    Joined: Jul 21, 2004
    Posts: 25
    I transitioned to Mac not too long after the introduction of Mac OS X. I can't see going back to Windows (if developing on Mac became impracticable I would probably switch over to Linux).

    I spend more time working on productive tasks and less time messing with the OS.
    Malware is not a major concern.
    The OS is a pleasure to use (which is good, because I spend a lot of time using it).
    The hardware is a pleasure to use (which is good, because I spend a lot of time using it).
    The OS is UNIX, which I like. In addition to a modern and effective GUI, it has all the power and flexibility of the UNIX command-line tools and utilities, a powerful shell (i.e. bash), can run X11 and interact seamlessly with Linux servers, et cetera.
    If I need to run Windows for something (which is rare), I can use virtualization to run it without ever leaving my Mac desktop. In fact, I can run Windows apps *on* my Mac desktop.
    Lance Colton
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Nov 25, 2010
    Posts: 64

    Andrew Monkhouse wrote:On Mac you just have to turn it on, and start writing.


    Sounds more like you have to pop in the disc, grep through the software, install it, go to *insert website* find the IDE, download it, then install it, then find the version control you want to use from *insert website* install it, configure it, then you can start thinking about code :P
    Hussein Baghdadi
    clojure forum advocate
    Bartender

    Joined: Nov 08, 2003
    Posts: 3479

    "With OS X, Apple has achieved something no one else has been able to do: create a consumer-viable Unix implementation. "
    Mr. Bear said it all.
    I'm a long time lover of FreeBSD but unfortunately it is not a laptop friendly OS.
    What is unique about Apple (among other things) is their sharp attention to the details.
    Precision, precision and precision.
    Even the expensive non-Apple products don't pay such amount of attention.
    Yes Apple products are expensive but they worth every penny you spend.
    Last week I downloaded the beta version of the famous "Reeder" app on the Mac, if this what Steve Jobs means by saying OS X Lion will bring iOS back to the Mac, then I don't have any word to say (seriously), you have to see by yourself.
    Keynote for presentation, Finale/Sibelius for music authors (used by the most respected musicians and music institutes), FinalCut/Aperture/Logic Studio for creative professions, Scrivener for writers and the list goes very long.
    What really amazes me, it is a Unix!
    Adam Koblentz
    Greenhorn

    Joined: Mar 18, 2011
    Posts: 19

    Bear, didn't you and I have this discussion at dinner? See, it's a real discussion topic. I want MORE developers on osx if for no other reason than more awesome indie Mac software.
    Bear Bibeault
    Author and ninkuma
    Marshal

    Joined: Jan 10, 2002
    Posts: 61658
        
      67

    Adam Koblentz wrote:Bear, didn't you and I have this discussion at dinner? See, it's a real discussion topic. I want MORE developers on osx if for no other reason than more awesome indie Mac software.

    Indeed!
     
    It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
     
    subject: Why mostly architects or authors use Mac than software developer’s population use of PC's?