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Is it allowed to show the assigned program in a potential new job as a reference?

Matthew Raw
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 30, 2010
Posts: 76

Hello,

I consider taking the OCMJD exam in a few years and I think that the program would be also a nice reference of my work in Java for possible future employers (for example attaching the program with my CV). My question is, if this is not prohibited by Oracle. Do you think, that it is allowed?

Best regards,
RP
Roel De Nijs
Bartender

Joined: Jul 19, 2004
Posts: 5545
    
  13

Attaching a complete program to your cv Most companies ask a cv in Word format or a pdf one, so how are you gonna attach all the sources (or the application as a runnable jar) to your cv? If you mention SCJD (or OCMJD) on your cv the future employer knows (or should know) you are capable of writing a fine application according to specifications, conventions and documentation.

SCJA, SCJP (1.4 | 5.0 | 6.0), SCJD
http://www.javaroe.be/
Matthew Raw
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 30, 2010
Posts: 76

To Roel:
Well, this is a good argument. But I thought that it would be nice to attach the program to the e-mail (with CV), so that the possible employer would exactly see my programming practices. I think that for most employers it is good to see some actual work instead of just listing the certificates in the CV (the employer may even not know what OCMJD yields).

So the question still remains - is it allowed or not?
Roel De Nijs
Bartender

Joined: Jul 19, 2004
Posts: 5545
    
  13

I have never been asked to show code from earlier developments to an employer. Sometimes I showed a web application I developed, but no actual sources. And a company / development team mostly has its own programming practices and conventions, so you'll have to adapt/change yours.

It's not allowed to share the source code of your assignment to other people.
Matthew Raw
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 30, 2010
Posts: 76

Roel De Nijs wrote:
It's not allowed to share the source code of your assignment to other people.


That is what I thought. But I have rather asked to be sure.

Now I wonder whether it is better to develop some web application on my own, which I could show to the employer and which would incorporate all the hot stuff like Hibernate, Spring, etc. or whether it is better to do the OCMJD and only mention it in the CV...
Roberto Perillo
Bartender

Joined: Dec 28, 2007
Posts: 2267
    
    3

Howdy, Rene!

Champ, the Java certifications are themselves good differentials for you to have in your CV. This isn't necessary. But this is more for you to have more job opportunities. You'll still have to go through interviews, which is where you'll show you know Java.


Cheers, Bob "John Lennon" Perillo
SCJP, SCWCD, SCJD, SCBCD - Daileon: A Tool for Enabling Domain Annotations
Roel De Nijs
Bartender

Joined: Jul 19, 2004
Posts: 5545
    
  13

It all depends on the job you want. If you want to go for a web application developer, you may prefer certification in the web app technologies, like Spring, Hibernate, JPA, EJB, JSF,... instead of this certification. If you have zero (or little) experience, creating your own (web) applications could be useful to make yourself familiar with all these technologies, but you'll be a candidate for a 'junior' position and then it's quiet logical you have limited experience in these technologies. So it all depends on your current situation and your future job.
Elchin Asgarli
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 08, 2010
Posts: 222

In short the answer is no, you cannot.

Longer answer: You got to tell the company that Sun has a non-disclosure policy, thus you cannot give them your code. It will also show that you do respect agreements you made, so in future you are less likely to distribute code that you made for the new company ;)

Furthermore Sun assignments do not reflect the real-world assignments in many ways, there are many things you would normally do, however Sun gives you no credit for that (nice GUI for example). Thus for example showing your new company the GUI that you made for Sun assignment may not be a good idea.


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