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how to remember so many old, new java concepts, fundamentals, rules

Mathew Lee
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Joined: Jun 08, 2009
Posts: 238
Hi,

I feel overwhelmed to rememberr so many java concepts, fundamentals, rules all the time at the top of my mind. I do remember those them when i was visiting the book or tutorial back. But to keep them on my mind all of them all the time is tough task for me. What is the best strategy for me to master old, new java and j2ee related concepts. Any links, ideas, suggestions, resources highly appreciated. Thanks in advance
Mohamed Sanaulla
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Joined: Sep 08, 2007
Posts: 3071
    
  33

The important concepts are the OO concepts and how Java implements them. Rest of the other things are how you explore/(make use) of the libraries and different features of the language. Its true that looking at the vastness developers often get overwhelmed. But the fact is that we often dont use all of them. There are few concepts which we use often and there are a few which are used on special requirements. So by practice and repeated exposure to these features- in the form of coding/application development will help you to be familiar with it.
Also the most important thing is- You need to know what feature/library to use in the given use case. You may not know the exact implementation of the feature, but there are materials/guides available which will help you to learn.


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Mathew Lee
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 08, 2009
Posts: 238
>>>Also the most important thing is- You need to know what feature/library to use in the given use case. You may not know the exact implementation of the feature, but there are materials/guides available which will help you to learn.


how to know what feature or library to use in the given use case or scenario.What are the best guides, materials available. Please advise.
Mohamed Sanaulla
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Joined: Sep 08, 2007
Posts: 3071
    
  33

gudim gudi wrote:>>>Also the most important thing is- You need to know what feature/library to use in the given use case. You may not know the exact implementation of the feature, but there are materials/guides available which will help you to learn.

how to know what feature or library to use in the given use case or scenario.What are the best guides, materials available. Please advise.


This would come with experience and constant reading. For guides you can always use Search engines(google and others). And always you have this site which will help you with any issues you are facing
Ralph Cook
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Joined: May 29, 2005
Posts: 479
I will go a step further and say that learning proceeds from the specific to the general.

I recommend starting with a project of some sort that will use the tools you want to learn -- hopefully just a few of them at first -- and write it. It doesn't have to be real work, it doesn't have to be commercially viable (or even useful) when you're done, but set out to implement a set of functions and then do it.

If you are starting out new to Java as well as large APIs (J2EE is particularly huge), then consider a project that can start out using classes, objects, methods, inheritance, and some of the more common design patterns common to all OO programming, and only after that is working try to expand it to the bigger API.

One other thing about crawling the web looking for information -- try to find explanations of concepts, rather than JUST examples. Too many so-called tutorials are saying things like "We're going to learn about JTree today -- here's an example -- ok, we're done now." I am NOT NOT NOT saying people shouldn't use examples. I am saying that an explanation of the concepts involved is necessary if you really want to teach people about how to use something different ways, instead of just one way to use it. Sure we can generalize it sometimes, but it's easy to generalize it wrongly, and concepts are bound to be missed this way.

 
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