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Seven Languages: why isn't Python related?

 
Rogerio Kioshi
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Don't you think Python could be related in "Seven Languages in Seven Weeks"? I'm currently interested in Python because of GAE (Google App Engine).
 
Bruce Tate
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Rogerio Kioshi wrote:Don't you think Python could be related in "Seven Languages in Seven Weeks"? I'm currently interested in Python because of GAE (Google App Engine).


It was the top object oriented language that didn't make it; Smalltalk being second. I only wanted to do one object oriented language so I could focus more on the functional languages. We did a poll among Pragmatic Bookshelf readers, and the readers requested Ruby, and I already knew that language. So I included Ruby, struck Python and Javascript for reasons I've described elsewhere on this thread, and just worked down the list for the rest.

I'm very happy with the mix of languages, but Python could have been a very good mix.

Great question.
 
Campbell Ritchie
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You obviously have to make a decision somewhere. Languages come and go; if you find a twenty-year old book it will tell you that the most popular object-oriented languages are called Smalltalk and Eiffel.
I notice you covered Prolog; how does that compare to Oz?

And as for languages coming and going, it is interesting that three of the oldest languages ever (FORTRAN, LISP and Cobol) are still in common use, albeit maybe in more modern versions.
 
Hauke Ingmar Schmidt
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Honestly, while I like Python for some things, I don't think it is a good language to show concepts. Python allows a mix of different paradigms that can lead to clutter; can get handy if needed and used appropriately, not good for teaching concepts.
 
Bruce Tate
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Campbell Ritchie wrote:You obviously have to make a decision somewhere. Languages come and go; if you find a twenty-year old book it will tell you that the most popular object-oriented languages are called Smalltalk and Eiffel.
I notice you covered Prolog; how does that compare to Oz?

And as for languages coming and going, it is interesting that three of the oldest languages ever (FORTRAN, LISP and Cobol) are still in common use, albeit maybe in more modern versions.


I've never written Oz, but I had a friend recommend it as I was writing this book. I think it's quite different from Prolog. The paradigms are dramatically different, I think.
 
With a little knowledge, a cast iron skillet is non-stick and lasts a lifetime.
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