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Char Sui Pork

Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
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Joined: Jan 10, 2002
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  67



Mmmm, the best part is that it tastes as good as it looks!

Bear's Char Siu Pork

4 lbs pork roast cut into medium-thick cutlets (or use ribs)
1/2 cup hoisin sauce
1/2 cup sherry (or brandy, or rum)
1/4 cup honey
1/4 cup soy sauce
2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil
2 tablespoons Sriracha
1 tablespoons powdered or freshly grated ginger
1 tablespoon garlic powder
1 tablespoon five spice powder
2 tablespoons onion powder
red food coloring (optional, but traditional)

1. Mix all ingredients but the pork in a bowl to create the marinade.

2. Place the pork in a zip-lock bag and pour in the marinade. Marinate the meat overnight.

3. Preheat oven to 300ºF.

4. Spread pork cutlets or ribs out onto a rack over a sheet pan. Reserve the left-over marinade. Don't forget to line the pan with aluminum foil or you'll be very sorry when clean-up time comes.

5. Roast 1 hour.

6. While pork is roasting, place the reserved marinade in a saucepan and boil vigorously for 5 to 10 minutes until thickened. Set aside.

7. After the 1 hour roasting time, baste the pork with the thickened glaze. Place back into the oven for 10 to 15 minutes to set the glaze.

8. Let rest 10 minutes. Slice the pork thinly and serve over noodles (or rice).

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David O'Meara
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Joined: Mar 06, 2001
Posts: 13459

You must be pretty pleased
Another serving suggestion is to freeze it then cut thinly into 2-3mm slices (about 1/32 to 1/16 inch?) then reheat for a warm salad.
Kaustubh G Sharma
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Joined: May 13, 2010
Posts: 1281

Looking Great ... But I am pure vegetarian


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Christophe Verré
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Joined: Nov 24, 2005
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  16

Looks yummy and easy to prepare. But so many ingredients !


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Campbell Ritchie
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Joined: Oct 13, 2005
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  28
Bear Bibeault wrote: . . . Preheat oven to 300ºF. . . .
150°C, approx, or gas mark 2. Quite a slow oven.
Stephan van Hulst
Bartender

Joined: Sep 20, 2010
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  17

Wow, I think I might try that next weekend. Thanks for the recipe, it looks great.
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
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Joined: Jan 10, 2002
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David O'Meara wrote:Another serving suggestion is to freeze it then cut thinly into 2-3mm slices (about 1/32 to 1/16 inch?) then reheat for a warm salad.

Mmmmm. Bet that's tasty!

Christophe Verré wrote:Looks yummy and easy to prepare. But so many ingredients !

Seems that way, but it's really easy to throw together even so. The hardest part of the whole thing is grating the ginger (and that ain't all that hard!)

Campbell Ritchie wrote:Quite a slow oven.

Indeed. Slow-roasted pork goodness!

Stephan van Hulst wrote:Wow, I think I might try that next weekend. Thanks for the recipe, it looks great.

Let us know how it comes out!


And the best part: there are enough left-overs to have it again for dinner tomorrow evening. Yum!
Kaustubh G Sharma
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Joined: May 13, 2010
Posts: 1281

can we make this without PORK ???
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
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  67

I guess you could make Char Siu Brussels Sprouts if you wanted to -- just keep them away from me!
Campbell Ritchie
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Joined: Oct 13, 2005
Posts: 40052
    
  28
Bear Bibeault wrote: . . . Char Sui Brussels Sprouts . . .
As Homer Simpson would say
Aaaaarrrrghh!
Kaustubh G Sharma
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 13, 2010
Posts: 1281

Bear Bibeault wrote:I guess you could make Char Siu Brussels Sprouts if you wanted to -- just keep them away from me!


Sprouts would be an healthy option for you my friend... BTW we've lots of tasty veg food also that'll forget you..your non-veg... But you'll not find it over there...for that you suppose to come in INDIA ....
Bear Bibeault
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I love vegetables! In fact, I particularly mentioned Brussels Sprouts because they are one of the only two vegetables I cannot abide (eggplant being the other).

I've enjoyed many a vegetarian meal, but could never be a vegetarian.
Mike Simmons
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Joined: Mar 05, 2008
Posts: 3018
    
  10
I think the important question is: could you eat a vegetarian? Best of both worlds, I say.
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
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Not if they were a Brussels Sprouts eater!
Stephan van Hulst
Bartender

Joined: Sep 20, 2010
Posts: 3649
    
  17

It seems to be very common for people not to like Brussels sprouts. I'm not picky about my food, but I really dislike 'spruitjes', as we call them.
Matthew Brown
Bartender

Joined: Apr 06, 2010
Posts: 4490
    
    8

Stephan van Hulst wrote:It seems to be very common for people not to like Brussels sprouts. I'm not picky about my food, but I really dislike 'spruitjes', as we call them.

I don't usually like them, but I did cook some at Christmas that were quite nice. Mind you, that involved frying them and adding bacon. There are plenty of foods that can be improved by frying and adding bacon.
Paul Sturrock
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Joined: Apr 14, 2004
Posts: 10336

Bear Bibeault wrote:I love vegetables! In fact, I particularly mentioned Brussels Sprouts because they are one of the only two vegetables I cannot abide (eggplant being the other).

I've enjoyed many a vegetarian meal, but could never be a vegetarian.


Have you tried (Indian people - please correct me if I spell this wrong) brinjal bhaji? The nicest way to eat aubergine I've come across. A chef explained to me that its best done using an open fire to roast the aubergine for about an hour before using it. It is also closely followed by any Italian recipe that involves thinly sliced caramelized aubergine mixed into sauces. Worth checking out; both are quite far removed from the normal appreciation of aubergine (i.e. rubbery and a bit bland tasting). Might make you change your mind.


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Bear Bibeault
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My problems with Brussels sprouts and eggplant aren't blandness, but just the opposite: strong, off flavors.

Brussels sprouts tastes like sucking on a dirty penny to me. A bitter metallic taste.

Eggplant tastes like I imagine dirty gym socks would taste. A moldy, dirty flavor.

Sort of like how some people say that cilantro (which I adore) tastes like soap to them.
Stephan van Hulst
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Joined: Sep 20, 2010
Posts: 3649
    
  17

Matthew Brown wrote:
Stephan van Hulst wrote:It seems to be very common for people not to like Brussels sprouts. I'm not picky about my food, but I really dislike 'spruitjes', as we call them.

I don't usually like them, but I did cook some at Christmas that were quite nice. Mind you, that involved frying them and adding bacon. There are plenty of foods that can be improved by frying and adding bacon.

I had an online acquaintance, and he's quite good in the kitchen. Some of us dared him to make something with chocolate and bacon. I think what he did was coat bacon strips in chocolate and then deep frying them.
It doesn't sound very appetizing, but he said they came out amazing :P
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
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  67

I've had that. It's fantastic. Sweet and salty!
Paul Clapham
Bartender

Joined: Oct 14, 2005
Posts: 18991
    
    8

I don't know about brussels sprouts, but I think that Char Sui Broccoli would be more authentic Chinese (in so far as what we get in Chinese restaurants in North America is "authentic") and it looks like it would be suitable for vegetarians.
Paul Sturrock
Bartender

Joined: Apr 14, 2004
Posts: 10336

Bear Bibeault wrote:I've had that. It's fantastic. Sweet and salty!


Wow. I come from the land of the deep fried Mars bar and deep fried pizza; even I think that sounds a little too unhealthy!

Mind you, did I hear right and they deep fry beer in your state?
Deepak Bala
Bartender

Joined: Feb 24, 2006
Posts: 6662
    
    5

Mind you, did I hear right and they deep fry beer in your state?




<open a new tab and google it>

hmmm... http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddrink/foodanddrinknews/7973944/Deep-fried-beer-invented-in-Texas.html

"Waiter... I'd like a glass of fried water please. Whats that ? Yes I would like them with fried ice cubes."


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Matthew Brown
Bartender

Joined: Apr 06, 2010
Posts: 4490
    
    8


The final line from that article:
Last year's winner of the Texas state fair fried food competition was a recipe for deep-fried butter.

Deep-fried Mars Bar! Ha! We laugh at your health food!
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
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I've never been to a State Fair, but I do know they make a "thing" out of deep-frying everything under the sun.

Though I dearly love almost all deep-fried foods (and man, do I love me some fish-n-chips), I don't have them very often. One reason is for health concerns, the other is that I will am under threat of bodily harm if I deep-fry in the house. I guess that's a health concern too!

Kaustubh G Sharma
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 13, 2010
Posts: 1281

Bear Bibeault wrote:My problems with Brussels sprouts and eggplant aren't blandness, but just the opposite: strong, off flavors.

.


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