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J2EE Design Patterns - Process Layer VS Business Component

Sonx Nkuks
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Joined: Aug 20, 2010
Posts: 47
Hi, i have to go through an existing pattern implemented on a very large system. Three layers are used; Presentation layer, process layer and business component. So far i'm quite happy with the flow from Presentation layer to business component. But am a little confused as to how the process layer is used or even the meaning of it. I noticed that in both layers a session facade is used as an entrance from presentation layer through a business delegate. Am also aware that the client code may not always use the process layer, which is where confusion emanates. How is this layer commonly used?
Jimmy Clark
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Joined: Apr 16, 2008
Posts: 2187
Sun Microsystems' (J2EE) three-tier programming model consisted of a Presentation-tier, a Business-tier and an Integration-tier.

The components on the Business tier are responsible for executing business logic (aka business processes). This includes and requires business data.

In some situations where this model was not clearly understood, the idea that business "data" was separate from business "process" was promoted and cooky named layers were created. Also, other similiar programming models were created and used the term "layer" instead of "tier."
Sonx Nkuks
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Joined: Aug 20, 2010
Posts: 47
Jimmy Clark wrote:Sun Microsystems' (J2EE) three-tier programming model consisted of a Presentation-tier, a Business-tier and an Integration-tier.

The components on the Business tier are responsible for executing business logic (aka business processes). This includes and requires business data.

In some situations where this model was not clearly understood, the idea that business "data" was separate from business "process" was promoted and cooky named layers were created. Also, other similiar programming models were created and used the term "layer" instead of "tier."


Hi Jimmy thanks for your response. If business process (logic) is part of the business components or means thew same thing, how come they are named as separate layers? Is there really a distinction between the words layer and tier? Also what exactly lies on the integration tier or where would it fit in in the current system with presentation, process and business component layers? I have looked at the J2EE three-tier model and got a bit confused with integration tier
Jimmy Clark
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Joined: Apr 16, 2008
Posts: 2187
If business process (logic) is part of the business components or means thew same thing, how come they are named as separate layers?


Basically, if you want an answer to this question you will have to ask the individuals that created your system. They are the only ones that can give you an answer because this is something that they created. Your description clearly reveals that the system was not designed in accordance with Sun's J2EE programming model.

The term "tier" when used in the context of Sun's J2EE three-tier programming model is synonymous with layer.

The term "tier" also has different definitions in computer science and construction. However, in regards to the J2EE model, the author's made the decision to use the term "tier."

The Integration tier is where the external and non-object-oriented components are. This includes relational database management systems, file-systems, web services, other information systems and programs.
Sonx Nkuks
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 20, 2010
Posts: 47
Jimmy Clark wrote:
If business process (logic) is part of the business components or means thew same thing, how come they are named as separate layers?


Basically, if you want an answer to this question you will have to ask the individuals that created your system. They are the only ones that can give you an answer because this is something that they created. Your description clearly reveals that the system was not designed in accordance with Sun's J2EE programming model.

The term "tier" when used in the context of Sun's J2EE three-tier programming model is synonymous with layer.

The term "tier" also has different definitions in computer science and construction. However, in regards to the J2EE model, the author's made the decision to use the term "tier."

The Integration tier is where the external and non-object-oriented components are. This includes relational database management systems, file-systems, web services, other information systems and programs.


Thanks Jimmy, this was quite helpful
 
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