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Author

How is this book for new users to Android?

Ryuunosuke Miyauchi
Greenhorn

Joined: Mar 14, 2011
Posts: 2
Im not only new to Android, but at the same time new to programming. I've recently started with Head First Java 2nd edition, as I wish to begin a small business creating Apps for the Android Market place, but my only background in any type of coding is HTML, which I did back in high school when I was 16 (currently 21).

In the end, I want to create software for PCs, tablets, and phones. So i've also picked up Sam's Teach yourself C++ in 10 minutes, as my end goal in a couple years is becoming a professional programmer.

Lucas Jordan
author
Greenhorn

Joined: Feb 10, 2011
Posts: 15
Android is very well documented by Google. Sure there are some places where they could do a little better, but overall, not too bad. If you are just starting out with programming, in general, I don't think you will find Android that much more complex than say, plain old Java.

As for the book, there is a chapter on using HTML/JavaScript/CSS to create Android applications. That being said, I would only recommend this strategy for developers looking to achieve a level of cross platform compatibility or for very simple applications.

If your in a position where where Java is a new language, I can't recommend this book, it assumes an understanding of Java. C++ and Java are not all that different, but probably considerably different for a new developer.

As for general advice... if you are looking to be able to write applications that work on the most devices, continue learning HTML/JavaScript/CSS, tools like Phone Gap, AIR, and browsers, probably give you the broadest reach. If you are looking to write the best quality apps learn Objective C (C++ is a good start) and Java (for Android and for Desktop).

-Lucas Jordan

URLS:
http://www.phonegap.com/
http://www.adobe.com/products/air/


Ryuunosuke Miyauchi wrote:Im not only new to Android, but at the same time new to programming. I've recently started with Head First Java 2nd edition, as I wish to begin a small business creating Apps for the Android Market place, but my only background in any type of coding is HTML, which I did back in high school when I was 16 (currently 21).

In the end, I want to create software for PCs, tablets, and phones. So i've also picked up Sam's Teach yourself C++ in 10 minutes, as my end goal in a couple years is becoming a professional programmer.



Lucas Jordan
President, ClayWare Games, LLC
Ryuunosuke Miyauchi
Greenhorn

Joined: Mar 14, 2011
Posts: 2
Now I do plan on working on learning Java from the current book I have atm, if I do reach a point where lets say I understand the basics of Java, would this book be helpful? Or would it still require a better understanding of Java?

For me, I really want to do more advanced apps (hopefully), and get to the point where I can write programs for Windows PCs or Macs. I thought a good starting point would've been C++, but I decided on learning Java first as I would like to first start on the Android platform. Later on I wish to learn other languages such as Python.

Lucas Jordan wrote:Android is very well documented by Google. Sure there are some places where they could do a little better, but overall, not too bad. If you are just starting out with programming, in general, I don't think you will find Android that much more complex than say, plain old Java.

As for the book, there is a chapter on using HTML/JavaScript/CSS to create Android applications. That being said, I would only recommend this strategy for developers looking to achieve a level of cross platform compatibility or for very simple applications.

If your in a position where where Java is a new language, I can't recommend this book, it assumes an understanding of Java. C++ and Java are not all that different, but probably considerably different for a new developer.

As for general advice... if you are looking to be able to write applications that work on the most devices, continue learning HTML/JavaScript/CSS, tools like Phone Gap, AIR, and browsers, probably give you the broadest reach. If you are looking to write the best quality apps learn Objective C (C++ is a good start) and Java (for Android and for Desktop).

-Lucas Jordan

URLS:
http://www.phonegap.com/
http://www.adobe.com/products/air/


Ryuunosuke Miyauchi wrote:Im not only new to Android, but at the same time new to programming. I've recently started with Head First Java 2nd edition, as I wish to begin a small business creating Apps for the Android Market place, but my only background in any type of coding is HTML, which I did back in high school when I was 16 (currently 21).

In the end, I want to create software for PCs, tablets, and phones. So i've also picked up Sam's Teach yourself C++ in 10 minutes, as my end goal in a couple years is becoming a professional programmer.

Lucas Jordan
author
Greenhorn

Joined: Feb 10, 2011
Posts: 15
If you are interested in working with Android this book will be helpful. You should be able to work through the material if you have worked through at least one Java book.

There are so many ways to write applications these days. If you have reasonable mastery of Java, C/C++, or Python, you will be able to create compelling applications on Windows, OS X, and Linux. As for iOS, knowing C/C++ and Java will make Objective C easy to pick up.

Ryuunosuke Miyauchi wrote:Now I do plan on working on learning Java from the current book I have atm, if I do reach a point where lets say I understand the basics of Java, would this book be helpful? Or would it still require a better understanding of Java?

For me, I really want to do more advanced apps (hopefully), and get to the point where I can write programs for Windows PCs or Macs. I thought a good starting point would've been C++, but I decided on learning Java first as I would like to first start on the Android platform. Later on I wish to learn other languages such as Python.
 
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