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New 'beginner' in Java Programming

 
Alex Horton
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Hey all. I'm a programmer that is more familiar with the Visual Studio .NET envirionment and am looking to see if there is a one stop shop free environment out there that I can begin developing jsp pages fairly fast.

What I'm looking for, exactly, is the ability to download a minimum amount of programs and get started developing a web site. For example - if I download Visual Studio Express, I get the Visual Studio Suite of developer tools (i.e. - Visual Web Developer .NET) along with a local ASP .NET server that automatically runs when I debug my applications. There's hardly any setup.

Is there something like that which exists for the Java side?!? I'm looking out on Google and have been overwhelmed with a bunch of this, that and the other.
 
Greg Brannon
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Why are you changing from what works well for you? It's not a personal/philosophical question, but understanding the reasons may help others give you a better answer.
 
Luigi Plinge
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NetBeans, Eclipse, and IntelliJ IDEA are the main IDEs that people use and all are good. Apache Tomcat is a popular open source software implementation of the Java Servlet and JavaServer Pages technologies. NetBeans has a Tomcat plug-in which claims to allow "developing and executing web applications with a Tomcat 5 web server", and I'm sure the other two have something similar.
 
Alex Horton
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Good point. Hete's why...

I just switched departments at work, the department then I came from was windows based, and the one I am in now is unix based. We have some applications that use java. I used bea weblogic workshop in the past, but I can't seem to find it.

I love the 1 stop shop availability of visual studio, and wanted to know if there is something similar for java.

sorry for the syntax I'm doing this on my droid x, lol
 
sean beacham
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Personally i use eclipse its a brilliant IDE suite
 
Alex Horton
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I like eclipse and our software is built off of eclipse, but how do you build a jsp website with it? will I have to download 5 different things just to build a website?
 
Paul Clapham
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No, I think going to the Eclipse download site and downloading "Eclipse for Java EE developers" should be sufficient.
 
sean beacham
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Theres different suites for different purposes.
 
Alex Horton
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paul, does that come with a development stand alone server?
 
Hauke Ingmar Schmidt
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The Java ecosphere is more about choices than the .net one is. There often enough is not the one standard way of doing things. This is why tools can't only present one way. You need to know what you want and choose the tools accordingly. You can select your persistence, presentation, DI, whatever. There are different accepted solutions.

But: If you want to do "standard" J2EE in an integrated packet, then for beginners Netbeans offers a complete solution including an app server (Glassfish, but you can install the web container Tomcat automatically, too). I guess this is what you are looking for. Download, install, create new project, run. Plus a few wizards and tutorials helpful for beginners.

With Eclipse you need more setup (some plugins, integrating an app server, even if it is only a three click act) and need to know better what you want and what you are doing. Not that well suited for beginners to the Java ecosphere (but there may be other reasons why the market share of Eclipse still is higher).
 
Alex Horton
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How would I do the 'three click' method for Eclipse? The software we're using is based on it.
 
Hauke Ingmar Schmidt
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Are you sure?? A web app/JSPs that is based on Eclipse? Eclipse RCP ... as fat client... or have other developers developed the application with Eclipse? Then, depending on your build process, it shouldn't matter what IDE you use (even if it is easier if you have more in-house knowledge of one IDE... but then you wouldn't ask here).

To add an application server to Eclipse: File / New... / Other... / Server. Depending on what server you select it must either be installed (which is: downloaded and uncompressed, most of the time) or for Tomcat (enough for JSP) you can even download it from within the Wizard. (Ok, I didn't exactly count the clicks.)

But given your first post I doubt this will help you much. The Netbeans "Java" package (the 173 MB, not "Java SE") seems more like what you need.
 
Alex Horton
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Kewl, I'll check out Netbeans. Will I be able to use the drag and drop feature like BEA?
 
Jesper de Jong
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NetBeans and Eclipse are both very good IDEs, but NetBeans comes with more support for things like JSP out-of-the-box. You'll get Glassfish v3 with NetBeans, which is Oracle's reference implementation for the Java EE standards. Creating web applications and running them on Glassfish is very easy with NetBeans. You can also do all those things with Eclipse, but it requires some more work to set it up.

There are also lots of tutorials and documentation on the NetBeans website.
 
Hauke Ingmar Schmidt
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After re-reading my post it may look like I would recommend Netbeans as kind of "beginner's" IDE. That was not my intention! I wanted to express what Jesper phrased better than me.
 
Alex Horton
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I'm trying to get a similar platoform to BEA - one where I can visually build my flows using drag and drop techniques, with actions and controllers. Something like that right out of the box without a bunch of config would help.

Is there somewhere that has a tutorial that may teach me this?
 
It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
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