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Code to be easily readable by a Junior Programmer

Oladeji Oluwasayo
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Joined: Sep 10, 2010
Posts: 101

What standard should we use for our "junior programmer"? Someone capable of passing OCPJP? Or OCAJ? Or a complete rookie? Because I want to start my server implementation and if using reflections is advisable, I may want to consider serialized objects over sockets (so that I can easily issue the name of the method to be executed to the server as a String and the server will execute it directly, instead of creating a big switch block to process the command associated with the command pattern) else, I opt for RMI. What do you think?


OCPJP 6, OCMJD 6
Oladeji Oluwasayo
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Joined: Sep 10, 2010
Posts: 101

has anybody passed using reflections?
Roberto Perillo
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Joined: Dec 28, 2007
Posts: 2265
    
    3

Oladeji Oluwasayo wrote:What standard should we use for our "junior programmer"?


Well champ, that's sort of hard to say because there isn't actually a parameter... but, my advice would be to keep the design as simple as possible. Always remember: the less code you write, the better. For everyone.

Oladeji Oluwasayo wrote:Because I want to start my server implementation and if using reflections is advisable


Sorry to say champ, but I'm very much against it. You know, I have been interviewing quite a lot of people for Java developer positions in the company I work for. Recently, there was a guy that claimed to be a senior Java developer. I asked if he was able to create annotations and consume them, and when and why he would create annotations. The guy didn't know annotations and reflection.


Cheers, Bob "John Lennon" Perillo
SCJP, SCWCD, SCJD, SCBCD - Daileon: A Tool for Enabling Domain Annotations
Jim Hoglund
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Joined: Jan 09, 2008
Posts: 525
Oladeji: I used the new RMI (the one you don't have to pre-compile) and
it works great, including with multiple clients. "rmiregistry.exe" handles
lots of stuff that you would otherwise have to deal with on your own.

Jim ...


BEE MBA PMP SCJP-6
Roel De Nijs
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Joined: Jul 19, 2004
Posts: 5218
    
  12

Oladeji Oluwasayo wrote:has anybody passed using reflections?

I think you are the 1st one mentioning reflection, but after using the search engine it is mentioned a few times. Mostly for testing purposes, but also for the assignment itself.


SCJA, SCJP (1.4 | 5.0 | 6.0), SCJD
http://www.javaroe.be/
Oladeji Oluwasayo
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Joined: Sep 10, 2010
Posts: 101

All right guys, guess I don't have to perform much stunts in my code then. I don't really like that idea but at the end of the day, I think passing is what matters not the elegance you can paint with your code. I was even thinking of making live results update in my GUI (like Windows Media search bar) but I'm starting to think twice. My thinking was that these cool stuffs will earn me some marks under "General Considerations" but since you guys implemented really simple stuffs, I have to keep the noise level low too; after all, so many people here have a greater degree of expertise than me when it comes to this Java Thing.
Roel De Nijs
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Joined: Jul 19, 2004
Posts: 5218
    
  12

Oladeji Oluwasayo wrote:My thinking was that these cool stuffs will earn me some marks under "General Considerations" but since you guys implemented really simple stuffs, I have to keep the noise level low too

It's clearly stated in the instructions that you will NOT get extra credits (points) for adding functionality that was not requested. So you'll get no extra points, the only thing that could happen with adding cool stuff is that you lose some marks because it's too complicated, it contains bugs,...
Oladeji Oluwasayo
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Joined: Sep 10, 2010
Posts: 101

Your work will be evaluated based on the following criteria.
The minimum passing score is 320 out of a possible 400 points.
General Considerations (100 points), 
Documentation (70 points), 
Object-oriented design (30 points), 
User Interface (40 points), 
Locking (80 points), 
Data class (40 points), 
Server (40 points)


So what comes under "General Considerations?"
Roel De Nijs
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Joined: Jul 19, 2004
Posts: 5218
    
  12

Oladeji Oluwasayo wrote:So what comes under "General Considerations?"

That's of course just a guess, but I think it's about things like the following: code conventions (upper case beginning letter for class names,...), variable names, method names, code readibility, consistency throughout your classes,...
Oladeji Oluwasayo
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Joined: Sep 10, 2010
Posts: 101

it's about things like the following: code conventions (upper case beginning letter for class names,...), variable names, method names, code readibility, consistency throughout your classes,...


So you really think that deserves the allotted 100 marks?
Roel De Nijs
Bartender

Joined: Jul 19, 2004
Posts: 5218
    
  12

Oladeji Oluwasayo wrote:So you really think that deserves the allotted 100 marks?

I'm not sure what gives you a maximum score on that section (I am not an accessor), but I do know you'll get no extra credits for doing some cool stuff which is not required (because that's clearly stated in the instructions, so you can only lose points by adding such functionality).
And I also do know (from the time people got a detailed score per section) that almost every developer who passed the assignment got 90 or more on general considerations. And also that it was very hard to get a perfect score on your GUI.
Oladeji Oluwasayo
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Joined: Sep 10, 2010
Posts: 101

almost every developer who passed the assignment got 90 or more on general considerations


Good News!
 
It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
 
subject: Code to be easily readable by a Junior Programmer