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VM question

 
giorgo teler
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Hello i have read that many Development teams are using VM is that true ??can someone please explain how to use the VM if this is possible or where to look about.
What i dont understand is why to use VM and how a guide would be good .
Thanks
 
Joe Ess
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Welcome to the JavaRanch.
What do you mean by VM? Virtual machine? Java bytecode runs inside a virtual machine of its own. Or are you asking about hardware virtualization?
 
giorgo teler
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Joe Ess wrote:Welcome to the JavaRanch.
What do you mean by VM? Virtual machine? Java bytecode runs inside a virtual machine of its own. Or are you asking about hardware virtualization?


Thank you very much for the welcome and for your reply .

What i mean is Virtualization i have seen that most people have a VM .Do they do it just for back up is it better for development for example look at http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/community/developer-vm/index.html they offer .

Why Should i Virtualize??What can i win besides multiple os?
thank you
 
Joe Ess
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Virtual machines can be useful in several ways. The ones you link to are for various development scenarios and can save time setting up a development environment (if one happens to use the same software stack as Oracle thinks one should).
My employer, for another example, only supports Windows XP. I prefer *nix, so I run Ubuntu 11.04 in VmWare Player on my work desktop. I have the best of both worlds: my employer's standard applications and my preferred environment on the same machine.
We also have a VmWare ESX server with two dozen or so virtual machines configured with various OS and browser combinations. This makes it easy to test our software against many different configurations without having a bunch of PC's sitting in a lab somewhere.
When we have to upgrade servers we will create a virtual machine to mimic the server configuration and use the vm to develop and debug an upgrade procedure. It's easy to revert a vm back to its initial state (either by backing up the vm or by using snapshots) so we can run through the procedure multiple times.
 
giorgo teler
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Joe Ess wrote:Virtual machines can be useful in several ways. The ones you link to are for various development scenarios and can save time setting up a development environment (if one happens to use the same software stack as Oracle thinks one should).
My employer, for another example, only supports Windows XP. I prefer *nix, so I run Ubuntu 11.04 in VmWare Player on my work desktop. I have the best of both worlds: my employer's standard applications and my preferred environment on the same machine.
We also have a VmWare ESX server with two dozen or so virtual machines configured with various OS and browser combinations. This makes it easy to test our software against many different configurations without having a bunch of PC's sitting in a lab somewhere.
When we have to upgrade servers we will create a virtual machine to mimic the server configuration and use the vm to develop and debug an upgrade procedure. It's easy to revert a vm back to its initial state (either by backing up the vm or by using snapshots) so we can run through the procedure multiple times.


thanks a lot
 
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