wood burning stoves 2.0*
The moose likes Other Application Frameworks and the fly likes CMS vs Framework Big Moose Saloon
  Search | Java FAQ | Recent Topics | Flagged Topics | Hot Topics | Zero Replies
Register / Login


JavaRanch » Java Forums » Frameworks » Other Application Frameworks
Bookmark "CMS vs Framework" Watch "CMS vs Framework" New topic
Author

CMS vs Framework

Souvvik Basu
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 05, 2010
Posts: 96
I'm not sure if this is the correct forum to put up this topic....if its not,moderators kindly put it in the right place.

I was/am studying JAVA framework Struts, when a friend told me about CMS, and how he can build a website in a day using CMS, that I'll probably take a week to create. This confuses me. Does it mean its a waste of time learning all these frameworks, and the underlying technologies (JSP/Servlets etc)? I'm sure its not, and I know I am missing a big part of the puzzle, but I dont know which and where.

Can anyone please clear my doubt? Where is it that I will have an advantage (when I am making a website) because I know the frameworks and underlying technologies over someone who knows just CMS? Which type of websites will they be? Or is it that I will have no advantage at all?
Marko Lavikainen
Greenhorn

Joined: Jul 04, 2011
Posts: 2
I think your friend is right and wrong at the same time. With CMS he probably means Content Management Systems that are applications to build web sites in common way. CMS is most likely built on top of some underlaying framework such Spring/JSP etc.

So they are a different thing.

CMS-applications have the advantage that they contain a lot of ready-made stuff to help creating web sites without much technical knowledge. However, CMS can do only so much and if some custom things are needed it may not support them. In many cases I have seen, organizations public web sites are built on top of some CMS and their intranets or whatever applications are then built in custom way.

But in your case it depends what the goals of the website are.
Joe Harry
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 26, 2006
Posts: 9394
    
    2

CMS as the abbreviation goes (Content Management Systems) are ideally suitable for business cases where there is a necessity to publish new web pages as and when required. For example., most of the corporate intranets will be based out of a CMS technology as there is a need to manage multitude of pages across different business domains. Like the above post clearly says, the CMS in turn is built on top of some frameworks like Spring / JSF / Struts (just to name a few). It is always good to learn the frameworks first and then look at any well known CMS solution (Alfresco for example) if you want to specialize in Portal and Content Management Systems.


SCJP 1.4, SCWCD 1.4 - Hints for you, Certified Scrum Master
Did a rm -R / to find out that I lost my entire Linux installation!
Souvvik Basu
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 05, 2010
Posts: 96
Thanks Marco & Joe...for helping me out. But I still have one question un-answered
What type of web portals/web applications/websites cannot be made well using CMS, and framework knowledge comes in handy?
Joe Harry
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 26, 2006
Posts: 9394
    
    2

Souvvik Basu wrote:Thanks Marco & Joe...for helping me out. But I still have one question un-answered
What type of web portals/web applications/websites cannot be made well using CMS, and framework knowledge comes in handy?


Those webseites that do not need the features offerred by a CMS. For example., there is no point for Yahoo Mail to be run using a CMS. I guess you still did not understand the need for a CMS.

Have a look at this http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enterprise_content_management
Ulf Dittmer
Marshal

Joined: Mar 22, 2005
Posts: 42022
    
  64
CMS is an extremely broad term; almost any textual (and other) data can be deemed "content", so a mail system like Yahoo Mail is most certainly a candiate for using a CMS. It's just not a "standard" web CMS like Joomla or Alfresco.


Ping & DNS - my free Android networking tools app
Joe Harry
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 26, 2006
Posts: 9394
    
    2

Ulf Dittmer wrote:CMS is an extremely broad term; almost any textual (and other) data can be deemed "content", so a mail system like Yahoo Mail is most certainly a candiate for using a CMS. It's just not a "standard" web CMS like Joomla or Alfresco.


Well, to me any content that I see in the web browser are ideal candidates to be served from a CMS. The original poster was asking if by using CMS systems (instead of standard frameworks), he could easily build web pages faster. I guess he meant the use of the "standard" web CMS like Joomla or Alfresco.
 
GeeCON Prague 2014
 
subject: CMS vs Framework