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Why Just Plain Java

 
jp roberts
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I've developed a couple of application using Groovy and never want to write plain java code any more. Why still use just plain java coding when it takes so much code to get a little done? It seems like the new scripting languages like Groovy, Scala and even the new stuff from Red Hat, Ceylon, are easier and quicker to code with.
 
Hussein Baghdadi
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Scala isn't exactly a scripting language and Ceylon is an experimental language and it is so early to talk about its adoption.
Languages like Java, C++ or C# represents the safe side. Mature, massive knowledge pool, a lot of developers, a lot of documentations, tons of libraries.
So if you a decision maker and you are responsible for money payments and project success, which route you take?
 
Gregg Bolinger
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At the end of the day Groovy is just Java and then eventually bytecode. Sure there are some slight performance hits because of all the reflection that has to happen for Groovy to execute but I'd guess that 99% of the time, it is a non-issue. Groovy is a tool and should be used just like any other tool in your toolbox. Would you use a hammer when a screwdriver will suffice?

I also prefer to use Groovy and my approach is to use groovy until groovy won't suffice. Then use something that will.
 
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