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Learning the Java libraries

 
Federico Cardelle
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After some months of studyng java, I can write some simple little programs... but I still have to consult the documentation to use almost every method (except for println(), equals() and a couple more). At this point I have some questions that more experienced people could answer:

1.What is the best way to memorize the frequently used classes?
2.How much of the SE and EE libraries can a professional java programmer use without reading the documentation? How long does it take to get there?
3.Will the time I spend learning that be still useful if I changed to another programming language?

Thanks.
 
Rob Spoor
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Federico Cardelle wrote:1.What is the best way to memorize the frequently used classes?

Use them. Then use them some more. And when you think you're done, use them again

2.How much of the SE and EE libraries can a professional java programmer use without reading the documentation? How long does it take to get there?

I think that if you know most of java.lang, java.util and java.io you're already well on your way.
If you work with user interfaces a lot you add java.awt.event, javax.swing and javax.swing.event to that list.
If you work with databases a lot you add java.sql to that list.

To be honest, for a lot of classes not in those packages, java.net or java.text, I too have to lookup quite a bit. And even for classes inside those packages I use the Javadoc pages now and then. And that should not be a problem either - that's what the Javadoc pages are for. Not just for the beginner, but also for the experienced user.

And how long it takes? It depends on how much you use them, and how good your memory is.

3.Will the time I spend learning that be still useful if I changed to another programming language?

Yes and no. You will be able to use the techniques you've learned, but the classes, methods, etc - those are mostly Java specific. If you switch to C# you'll have to learn its API again. But the way you think and use the available libraries - that's going to stay.
 
Campbell Ritchie
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I would suggest you don't try to learn the libraries. The documentation is easy to find, and you should bookmark it in your browser. You go to the documentation and look for what you need, and you will gradually remember the important bits.
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://aspose.com/file-tools
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