aspose file tools*
The moose likes Beginning Java and the fly likes A Beginner's Tutorial: where to start Big Moose Saloon
  Search | Java FAQ | Recent Topics | Flagged Topics | Hot Topics | Zero Replies
Register / Login
JavaRanch » Java Forums » Java » Beginning Java
Bookmark "A Beginner Watch "A Beginner New topic
Author

A Beginner's Tutorial: where to start

Gian Franco
blacksmith
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 16, 2003
Posts: 977
Dear Budi,

Welcome to JavaRanch!

Where does one start nowadays with a beginner's
tutorial?

What is the focus of your book?

Cheers,

Gian


"Eppur si muove!"
Campbell Ritchie
Sheriff

Joined: Oct 13, 2005
Posts: 39814
    
  28
Gian Franco wrote:. . . Where does one start nowadays with a beginner's tutorial? . . .Gian
Try page 1
Gian Franco
blacksmith
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 16, 2003
Posts: 977
Mohamed Sanaulla
Saloon Keeper

Joined: Sep 08, 2007
Posts: 3071
    
  33

Gian Franco wrote:

Where does one start nowadays with a beginner's
tutorial?

The Official tutorials has new section on Java 7 features: http://download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/


Mohamed Sanaulla | My Blog
Gian Franco
blacksmith
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 16, 2003
Posts: 977
Just to clarify...

The question was posed from the author's point of view...
where does one start to write, given the magnitude of
the Java platform...

Gian
Campbell Ritchie
Sheriff

Joined: Oct 13, 2005
Posts: 39814
    
  28
I personally would start with what an object is.
Mohamed Sanaulla
Saloon Keeper

Joined: Sep 08, 2007
Posts: 3071
    
  33

And then going forward to explain the OOP paradigm before getting into the stuff related to Java. Most people fail to understand the OOP paradigm when they start learning Java.

I meant not to answer on behalf of the author, so we would like to hear from the author.
Budi Kurniawan
Author
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 30, 2002
Posts: 65
Hi Gian,

--> where does one start to write, given the magnitude of the Java platform..

Good question. I did ask the same question myself when I was designing the first edition. I answered this at the beginning of the book:

Java is a mature programming language that is easy to learn. At the same time it is also a vast collection of technologies that are so diverse that beginners often don’t know where to start. If you are one of them, then this book is for you because it has been designed as a tutorial for novices.
As a beginner’s tutorial, this book does not teach you every Java technology there is. (It is impossible to cram everything into a single volume anyway, and that’s why most Java titles are focused on one technology.) Rather, this book covers the most important Java programming topics that you need to master to be able to learn other technologies yourself. Nonetheless this book is comprehensive that by fully understanding all the chapters and doing the exercises you’ll be able to perform an intermediate Java programmer’s daily tasks quite well.

This book offers all the three subjects that a professional Java programmer must be proficient in:

▪ Java as a programming language;
▪ Object-oriented programming (OOP) with Java;
▪ Java core libraries.

What makes structuring an effective Java course difficult is the fact that the three subjects are interdependent. On the one hand, Java is an OOP language, so its syntax is easier to learn if you already know about OOP. On the other hand, OOP features such as inheritance, polymorphism, and data encapsulation, are best taught if accompanied by real-world examples. Unfortunately, understanding real-world Java programs requires knowledge of the Java core libraries.

Because of such interdependence, the three main topics are not grouped into three isolated parts. Instead, chapters discussing a major topic and chapters teaching another are interwoven. For example, before explaining polymorphism, this book makes sure that you are familiar with certain Java classes so that real-world examples can be given. In addition, because a language feature such as generics cannot be explained effectively without the comprehension of a certain set of classes, it is covered after the discussion of the supporting classes.

There are also situations whereby a topic can be found in two or more places. For instance, the for statement is a basic language feature that should be discussed in an early chapter. However, for can also be used to iterate over a collection of objects, a feature that should only be given after the Collections Framework is taught. Therefore, for is first presented in Chapter 3, “Statements” and then revisited in Chapter 11, “The Collections Framework.”

Hope this answered your question. If you like you can download the first 198 pages of the book from here: http://books.brainysoftware.com/download/java7SampleChapters.pdf

Best,
Budi Kurniawan
Gian Franco
blacksmith
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 16, 2003
Posts: 977
Hello Budi,

It has thanks!

Kind regards,

Gian
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://aspose.com/file-tools
 
subject: A Beginner's Tutorial: where to start