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Printing a class diagram

Yohan Weerasinghe
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Joined: Oct 07, 2010
Posts: 499

Hey all,

Today I faced to a HUGE problem. I have completed my project in my second year, and they expect us to present the class diagram of the software. So I reverse engineered and created the diagram. But, when I go to print it, it CANNOT BE TAKEN IN TO A A4, A3 or whatever the paper size. Finally I went to a another shop who prints some advanced stuff. They told they can print it in A3, but it will take number of A3 papers, and the length will be 13 FEET!! The only other option was to print a DIGITAL BANNER!!! My question is, if no one can print a class diagram without getting this much big, how companies provide their documentation??? I am CONFUSED!! Now I am gonna give the class diagram in a CD. Please answer!!


Are you better than me? Then please show me my mistakes..
Karthik Shiraly
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Joined: Apr 04, 2009
Posts: 509
    
    6
Coding to a 13 feet UML banner is hilarious. Good one!

Jokes aside, a UML design diagram is meant to be read and understood by a human.
So the good old principle of Keep it Simple applies. Not every enum and utility implementation class is relevant to a design.
The design is the big picture, and that's what should be conveyed (or presented).
These reverse engineering tools are just tools. They can't decide whether a design is understandable or not. That's upto the designer.

Simplify your design and diagram, manually.
Split your system into multiple diagrams, each describing a subsystem or a component. Most software are built by a group of developers, with small teams allotted to each subsystem or component.
The design should reflect this, so that each team can concentrate on its relevant subsystem diagrams and understand them, but also be able to look up a larger level picture if necessary.
Get them all reviewed by another person, and ask them them if they can understand it.
Yohan Weerasinghe
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 07, 2010
Posts: 499

Karthik Shiraly wrote:Coding to a 13 feet UML banner is hilarious. Good one!

Jokes aside, a UML design diagram is meant to be read and understood by a human.
So the good old principle of Keep it Simple applies. Not every enum and utility implementation class is relevant to a design.
The design is the big picture, and that's what should be conveyed (or presented).
These reverse engineering tools are just tools. They can't decide whether a design is understandable or not. That's upto the designer.

Simplify your design and diagram, manually.
Split your system into multiple diagrams, each describing a subsystem or a component. Most software are built by a group of developers, with small teams allotted to each subsystem or component.
The design should reflect this, so that each team can concentrate on its relevant subsystem diagrams and understand them, but also be able to look up a larger level picture if necessary.
Get them all reviewed by another person, and ask them them if they can understand it.


Great, I got the answer, thanks for the help. I didn't know that we have to create the diagram by component to component. Now I know that . Anyway, the sad thing is, I can't do it now because I am out of time, so I will follow this way from my next design onwards. However, since this whole program is built by me, component to component class diagram would be bit difficult, because I have to create all of them. Never mind, I will get used to it, and I will surely follow your advice, thanks a lot for the help.
 
 
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