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Hibernate

 
Mariya Antony christopher
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If the database has 100 tables
we have to create 100 hibernate mapping files and 100 pojo files
is it worthy one for creating a web appilication
kindly suggest the comments

 
Hussein Baghdadi
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Sorry Mariya but I'm not following you, what do you mean by:
is it worthy one for creating a web appilication
 
Mariya Antony christopher
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Hussein Baghdadi wrote:Sorry Mariya but I'm not following you, what do you mean by:
is it worthy one for creating a web appilication

if the database has 100 tables
is it comfortable for writing CRUD operation code using hibernate
 
Vijitha Kumara
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Mariya Antony christopher wrote:...is it comfortable for writing CRUD operation code using hibernate

What kind of comfortability you are looking at here...? Are you comparing any other ORM framework or with plain JDBC programming?
 
Mariya Antony christopher
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comparing jdbc database coding with hibernate for 100 tables in a database

 
Vijitha Kumara
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Yes in that case you need to create the mapping files in Hibernate but it might give you a lot less maintenance work and also avoid boilerplate JDBC code.
 
Mariya Antony christopher
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Vijitha Kumara wrote:Yes in that case you need to create the mapping files in Hibernate but it might give you a lot less maintenance work and also avoid boilerplate JDBC code.

what do you meant by boilerplate JDBC code?how the problem occurs?
kindly suggest!
 
Alex Armenteros
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If creating the 100 class models are too much, create only those who you'll use on that webservice. But remember that when you create one, you can use it on every application you develop.
 
Vijitha Kumara
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Mariya Antony christopher wrote:
Vijitha Kumara wrote:Yes in that case you need to create the mapping files in Hibernate but it might give you a lot less maintenance work and also avoid boilerplate JDBC code.

what do you meant by boilerplate JDBC code?how the problem occurs?...

It's that your are given the opportunity to configure most of them from xml and avoid many other tasks such as creating entities from retrieved rows etc...
 
Jimmy Clark
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If an application needs 100 different types of data object, then it needs 100 different types of data object. If you decide to write hand-written JDBC code or use a Hibernate implementation, the application still needs 100 different types of data objects. You cannot effectively use the total number of data objects as a realistic metric to determine whether to use an ORM framework or write the data access code from scratch.

The key here is to clearly identify what the requirements of the application are. Speculating or guessing that you will need to actually create 100 tables and also need 100 different types of data object is not productive analysis. The idea that you would need a Java class for every data table in a database is a bit fuzzy and misleading. Aside, Hiberate mappings can be designed to extract from many tables in order to create a single persistent object.

Data requirements should be based on clearly written application requirements and design. If you are attempting to build an application and are starting to design a relational database first, you most likely will end up with a weak application design.

Keep in mind that Hibernate is a powerful, ultra-high performance framework. It is highly unlikely that you can write more efficient code than the Hibernate programmers. This is one of the primary reasons why using Hibernate is a best practice.
 
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