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Career in Oracle/Java?

neriyan nadasen
Greenhorn

Joined: Feb 21, 2012
Posts: 7
Hi All,

I am currently an Oracle developer (SQL, PL/SQL & Forms) who does a little Java programming. In my country(South Africa) there is reasonable scope for Oracle developers but there is a huge demand for Java developers so I have been thinking of making the switch. The fact that I have SCJP 6 makes my job search a lot easier. Is it worth going the purely Java route or should I build on both my Oracle and Java skills seeing as Oracle now owns the Java platform? I guess what I really want to know is if you guys see Oracle technologies becoming even more integrated with Java technologies in the future and if so to what degree?

Any feedback would be much appreciated.

Thanks,
Zeeshan Sheikh
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 20, 2011
Posts: 144

Offcourse the reason Oracle bought Java because they use java in all of their products. so go for it as you have some programming experience you will enjoy learning new APIs. Welcome to Java


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Deepak Rao
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jan 24, 2012
Posts: 31

You can start with Java without losing your DB edge. A mixture of strong Java and Oracle skills is extremely useful in the industry.
Akhilesh Trivedi
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 22, 2005
Posts: 1526
How do you see databases opposite to Oracle? It is highly likely that even a pure Java Programmer comes in close contacts with a DB developer. They need to go hand in hand.


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Matthew Brown
Bartender

Joined: Apr 06, 2010
Posts: 4339
    
    7

One thing to remember - while there may be more specifically Java jobs than Oracle DB jobs, there are probably more people capable of doing them as well. And someone that can do both would be in a good position.
chris webster
Bartender

Joined: Mar 01, 2009
Posts: 1607
    
  13

Matthew Brown wrote:One thing to remember - while there may be more specifically Java jobs than Oracle DB jobs, there are probably more people capable of doing them as well. And someone that can do both would be in a good position.


That's a good point, but it depends on the job market where you are.

I'm an experienced Oracle developer with some Java experience as well, but from what I've seen it can be quite difficult to break into Java development here in the UK, for example, because there are thousands of inexperienced Java developers around already, either recent college graduates or the thousands of relatively inexperienced developers who have been brought into the UK from lower wage countries in recent years. Employers don't necessarily want to pay for your Oracle skills if they're just hiring a Java developer, because they can get an inexperienced Java developer relatively easily/cheaply anyway. And if they do want to pay for your Oracle skills, it often means they really want you working on Oracle stuff rather than Java. So you may have to be prepared to lower your salary expectations in line with the skills/experience expected for a junior Java job.

Another factor to consider is that although there is certainly a wide demand for Java skills, the widespread focus on JEE systems being "database agnostic" means that many companies no longer invest in database-specific skills or technology, and many architects and software designers no longer have much understanding or awareness of database technology, or indeed the difference between database administration and database application development.

In some places, this means nobody knows or cares much about taking advantage of the powerful tools available on the RDBMS, because they want to be able to swap out the DB easily, so they focus all their efforts on a pure Java solution. And there can be a tendency to assume that Java developers can pick up what little they need to know about databases, so why bother hiring (=paying for) people with more specialist DB skills? The relative abundance of inexperienced Java developers also means that in some cases people will use Java simply because those are the skills they already have available.

But on other sites, especially where people are dealing with serious volumes of data, you can find there is actually a greater demand for people who understand how to use the power of an enterprise RDBMS intelligently e.g. data warehousing, ETL, data migration, OLAP, and so on.

So I would say, definitely go ahead and learn Java and try to get some commercial experience with it - it's fun, it will introduce you to new ideas and technologies, and it will almost certainly be useful for your career. But also keep an eye on the broader job market and trends in the sectors where you want to work. My own impression is that there are certainly some parts of the industry where good database skills are almost becoming a "legacy" skillset, not because the technologies are obsolete but because their benefits are under-appreciated in an industry that is notoriously driven by techno-hype and swiftly changing fashions. So you could find your serverside DB skills are in greater demand than your Java skills.

Whatever you do, I would definitely look at breaking out of the Oracle Forms ghetto e.g. you could also try APEX for a quick way to build web clients for Oracle applications without Java (yes, it is possible!). You can try this out online via Oracle's hosted APEX environment and there's lots of tutorials on Oracle's website.

Either way:

SELECT 'Good luck!' FROM dual;
Akhilesh Trivedi
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 22, 2005
Posts: 1526
chris webster wrote:...difference between database administration and database application development.

But on other sites, especially where people are dealing with serious volumes of data, you can find there is actually a greater demand for people who understand how to use the power of an enterprise RDBMS intelligently e.g. data warehousing, ETL, data migration, OLAP, and so on.



I strongly agree on these two, if you are a DB guy, you would better be expected to do database administration and the stuff like data-warehousing. It is hard to survive with database application development alone.
 
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subject: Career in Oracle/Java?
 
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