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Cucumber and JBehave

 
Sujoy Choudhury
Ranch Hand
Posts: 136
Eclipse IDE Ubuntu
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Hi Authors,

Got curious and have few questions for you:
1. Would like to know that why do we need Cucumber over JBehave?
2. What are the things that JBehave can't do and Cucumber can?
3. Does your "Why Cucumber" section talk about other frameworks?

 
Matt Wynne
author
Greenhorn
Posts: 14
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Hi Sujoy,

Cucumber and JBehave are designed to solve the same problem: writing automated tests in a way that they feel approachable to non-technical project stakeholders.

I've never used JBehave, but my understanding is that where Cucumber differs from JBehave is in how specifications are written. They both use plain-text files, but Cucumber uses the Gherkin syntax for its feature files, which is getting quite wide adoption, with tools like http://www.relishapp.com being written to publish feature files, for example. There are also tools to run Gherkin tests in various different languages such as SpecFlow for C#.

I don't know about the relative merits of the two tools, so I can't comment on that I'm afraid.

To be honest, I'd say that the main thing is not which tool you use, but how you use it:
- are you having regular sessions with the non-technical team members to review the scenarios you're working on?
- does everyone on the team have easy access to the scenarios?
- does everyone on the team feel a sense of shared ownership over the scenarios?

If you've achieved that with JBehave, I'd say you're doing just fine.
 
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