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Peer pressure for reading java books at Job

Rahul Shivsharan
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 17, 2009
Posts: 83
Hi,
I read technical books because i like it,
mostly Java technologies, UI related i.e HTML, Javascript , jQuery.
I read books at job too when i am not having any work, in PDF

Now when i read technical books or see technical blogs, my office colleagues taunt me that,
i should not read every thing, only read when that related kind of work comes i.e if i get work on Spring AOP than and only than i shoud read about AOP.
They say that its dumb if you read stuffs which has nothing to do with your work.

Recently i was reading on EJB Interceptors,
My colleagues said if i don't have any work on EJB, than why to read it.

Now my thougths are
If i read before and i am well prepared on new technologies,
than its good for me, thats what i think,
Waiting for your suggestions
John Jai
Bartender

Joined: May 31, 2011
Posts: 1776
When you only read when you get a work on it then its more like googling for solution

You can read articles in your home or just politely (or professionally) call them dumb if they still taunt you when you read in office.
Jayesh A Lalwani
Bartender

Joined: Jan 17, 2008
Posts: 2372
    
  28

That sounds like a work environment that is somewhat hostile to me. Can you talk to your boss about this? or is your boss involved in the bullying, too?
fred rosenberger
lowercase baba
Bartender

Joined: Oct 02, 2003
Posts: 11308
    
  16

you read it so that when a job comes up that requires EJB, you are ahead of the game. You can step up and say "I am already familiar with that, so i can take it and hit the ground running". Your colleagues would all have to say "I have no idea how to do that.".


There are only two hard things in computer science: cache invalidation, naming things, and off-by-one errors
Mohana Rao Sv
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 01, 2007
Posts: 485

Glad, they didn't tell you don't mess in javaranch. Don't listen to them just read what do you like.


ocjp 6 — Feeding a person with food is a great thing in this world. Feeding the same person by transferring the knowledge is far more better thing. The reason is the amount of satisfaction which we get through food is of only one minute or two. But the satisfaction which we can get through the knowledge is of life long.
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
Marshal

Joined: Jan 10, 2002
Posts: 61196
    
  66

Read whatever you want and don't let narrow-minded people tell you otherwise.


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fred rosenberger
lowercase baba
Bartender

Joined: Oct 02, 2003
Posts: 11308
    
  16

Bear Bibeault wrote:Read Do whatever you want and don't let narrow-minded people tell you otherwise.

Good advice for ALL areas of life - not just java books
Paul Anilprem
Enthuware Software Support
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 23, 2000
Posts: 3293
    
    7
Rahul Shivsharan wrote:Hi,
I read technical books because i like it,
mostly Java technologies, UI related i.e HTML, Javascript , jQuery.
I read books at job too when i am not having any work, in PDF

Now when i read technical books or see technical blogs, my office colleagues taunt me that,
i should not read every thing, only read when that related kind of work comes i.e if i get work on Spring AOP than and only than i shoud read about AOP.
They say that its dumb if you read stuffs which has nothing to do with your work.

Recently i was reading on EJB Interceptors,
My colleagues said if i don't have any work on EJB, than why to read it.

Now my thougths are
If i read before and i am well prepared on new technologies,
than its good for me, thats what i think,
Waiting for your suggestions

I think I can understand your problem. It happened to me as well long time back.

Time at work is not really your time. So you might want to get a feel about how your boss thinks about you spending time at work reading books that do not relate to your currently assigned work. Some managers don't like to get this fact thrown in their face that their direct report has free time on his hands as they feel it reflects badly on their management skills.

Remember that in a job, it is not always about right and wrong. You are dealing with people, so no matter how right you are, if some thing you are doing is making people unhappy, it is your loss.

Anyway, reading technical books in general is a good habit and if some people call you dumb for that, you don't need to worry about those people


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Jimmy Clark
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 16, 2008
Posts: 2187
Reading does not equal experience or skill. An individual can read all day and night and it still does not equal skill or ability in the particular subject matter. If an indiviudal feels ridiculed because of what they read on their free time, then the individual should not share what they are reading. However, if an individual is "boasting" or "bragging" about what they are reading that particular day, maybe they should be ridiculed to help stop this behavior as it could be highly disturbing, especially if someone is trying to create the perception that they are "experienced" in the particular technology simply by reading a book or two.
Jeanne Boyarsky
internet detective
Marshal

Joined: May 26, 2003
Posts: 30512
    
150

I read a ton in my free time. Both technical and non-technical. I do agree that on work time, you should be doing/reading something only if it benefits the employer. At lunch/during your commute/etc, read anything.

Reading about "irrelevant" technologies gives you ideas on how to solve problems which is a valuable skill.


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