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the future of Java?

 
Grega Leskovšek
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What destination app (applications/applets) do You believe is the future of Java? Thanks in advance, Grega
 
Mohamed Sanaulla
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Grega Leskovšek wrote:What destination app (applications/applets) do You believe is the future of Java? Thanks in advance, Grega

There have been quite a few discussions on this aspect.
The JVM platform is evolving to support growth of alternate languages. That said Java has some great updates to come in Java 8 and ahead. If you look at the adoption of Java now, it doesn't look like it would be out of business anytime soon.
The industry is moving towards Polyglot programming on the JVM and that's something cool I believe.
 
Grega Leskovšek
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What languages will Java 8 support? Thanks.
 
Mohamed Sanaulla
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Grega Leskovšek wrote:What languages will Java 8 support? Thanks.

Java is not same as the JVM. Java is one of the languages that run on the JVM. The others being Groovy, Scala, Clojure, JRuby, Kotlin.
Java 8 would support use of closures among other features like modularity.
 
Tim Moores
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I don't think Java 8 will make much of a difference for the language or the ecosystem, just like I don't think Java 7 will. It will help those that already use Java, but neither version is a game-changer, and neither opens up a whole new class of applications. Android did more for Java than both versions combined, IMO.
 
Mohamed Sanaulla
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Tim Moores wrote:I don't think Java 8 will make much of a difference for the language or the ecosystem, just like I don't think Java 7 will. It will help those that already use Java, but neither version is a game-changer, and neither opens up a whole new class of applications. Android did more for Java than both versions combined, IMO.

I dont think Android did anything much to make the language easier to use, as you said it added to the popularity of the language. The features in Java 7 are leveraged by the updates to come in Java 8. The JVM in my opinion is the game changer

Is it possible to use the Java language enhancements in Android?
 
Tim Moores
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Android is based on Java 5, not Java 7 or 8. That's not a drawback in my view - as I said, I don't think those versions will change much of anything (as, IMO, is true for sizable chunks of Java 5 and 6). Note that I'm talking about the language, not the JVM - which was substantially improved in Java 5 and 6.

Java the language is well-established by now, and far from being at the forefront of where hot new things are happening. Whatever is changed now is just more makeup and botox, but nothing that Ponce de Leon would get excited about.
 
rohit chavan
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Exactly, I see java everywhere, on every possible device, in years to come.
 
Mohamed Sanaulla
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Tim Moores wrote:
Java the language is well-established by now, and far from being at the forefront of where hot new things are happening. Whatever is changed now is just more makeup and botox, but nothing that Ponce de Leon would get excited about.

Exactly, I see the effort people are putting in getting in Closures in Java. Its said- get it right the first time, otherwise the development and maintenance cost will increase
 
Tim Moores
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rohit chavan wrote:Exactly, I see java everywhere, on every possible device, in years to come.

I wouldn't phrase it quite so strongly. Java on mobile (i.e., JME) is dead, millions of low-cost phones that are still to be sold notwithstanding. Android will continue to go places, but that's not strictly speaking Java. The other unusual place where JME lives on is Blu-ray, and that's not taking the world anywhere near as fast as was forecast when HD-DVD died.

I also predict that desktop Java will continue to make no impact, even though the roadmap for JavaFX looks better than it's looked for years.

JEE (in its pure shape, or "bastardized" shapes like GAE) will continue to reign for years to come.
 
Grega Leskovšek
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What Java is used in IOS and Android (4)?
WHat is Java FX? Is it dead too? Qhar rich internet applications? Thanks, Grega
 
Jayesh A Lalwani
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Ultimately, technologies like Java FX, Flash, etc will either die or be absorbed by the browser implementations themselves. "Rich" internet application should really be supported by the HTML standard itself. Unfortunately, HTML doesn't move at the speed of the internet which makes it neccesary to have technologies like these.

These are essentially bridge technologies to take us from one version of the standard to the next. They might die once the standard absorbs the features provided by them, or they might survive to be the next bridge. Flash was right at the cutting edge of this bridge, which is why it became very popular. IMO, Java FX is a little too late, but might survive to be the next bridge.
 
rohit chavan
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After more than a year this thread did start, I don't see JavaFx making a big impact. Or is it making, and I am not aware of it?
 
Carles Gasques
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My thoughts on the topic/s,

Since Apache Flex is in the road I don't see JavaFX as a challenger.
With HTML5 we are still stuck in the old scenario, that is you have to test your application view tier with N different browsers.
Closures would be a nice feature to have in Java and would be a relevant change from previous versions.
We don't have to ignore the new languajes running in JVM and from my point of view Scala is a powerfull tool to take in account.
 
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